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Apparent time interval of visual stimuli is compressed during fast hand movement.

Yokosaka T, Kuroki S, Nishida S, Watanabe J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The results show that hand movements, at least the fast ones, reduced the apparent time interval between visual events.A control experiment indicated that the apparent time compression was not produced by the participants' involuntary eye movements during the hand movements.These results, together with earlier findings, suggest hand movement can change apparent visual time either in a compressive way or in an expansive way, depending on the relative timing between the hand movement and visual stimulus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NTT Communication Science Laboratories, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation, Kanagawa, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The influence of body movements on visual time perception is receiving increased attention. Past studies showed apparent expansion of visual time before and after the execution of hand movements and apparent compression of visual time during the execution of eye movements. Here we examined whether the estimation of sub-second time intervals between visual events is expanded, compressed, or unaffected during the execution of hand movements. The results show that hand movements, at least the fast ones, reduced the apparent time interval between visual events. A control experiment indicated that the apparent time compression was not produced by the participants' involuntary eye movements during the hand movements. These results, together with earlier findings, suggest hand movement can change apparent visual time either in a compressive way or in an expansive way, depending on the relative timing between the hand movement and visual stimulus.

No MeSH data available.


The results in the main experiment (n = 7).(A) The means of the PSEs. Error bars denote the standard errors. (B) The means of the JNDs. Error bars denote the standard errors.
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pone.0124901.g003: The results in the main experiment (n = 7).(A) The means of the PSEs. Error bars denote the standard errors. (B) The means of the JNDs. Error bars denote the standard errors.

Mentions: The obtained PSEs are shown in Fig 3A. A one-way repeated measures ANOVA indicated a significant effect of hand movement speed (F(3, 24) = 4.23, P < 0.05, η2 = 0.26). Ryan’s method indicated that the PSE in the fast hand movement condition was significantly smaller than that in the no-motion condition (t(18) = 3.15, P < 0.05) and slow-hand-movement condition (t(18) = 2.81, P < 0.05). These results indicate that execution of fast hand movement compressed the perceived 200 ms interval. The obtained JNDs are shown in Fig 3B. A one-way repeated measures ANOVA indicated no significant effect of hand movement speed (F(3, 24) = 1.12, P = 0.37, η2 = 0.08). These results indicate that execution of hand movement did not affect the precision of judgments.


Apparent time interval of visual stimuli is compressed during fast hand movement.

Yokosaka T, Kuroki S, Nishida S, Watanabe J - PLoS ONE (2015)

The results in the main experiment (n = 7).(A) The means of the PSEs. Error bars denote the standard errors. (B) The means of the JNDs. Error bars denote the standard errors.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390366&req=5

pone.0124901.g003: The results in the main experiment (n = 7).(A) The means of the PSEs. Error bars denote the standard errors. (B) The means of the JNDs. Error bars denote the standard errors.
Mentions: The obtained PSEs are shown in Fig 3A. A one-way repeated measures ANOVA indicated a significant effect of hand movement speed (F(3, 24) = 4.23, P < 0.05, η2 = 0.26). Ryan’s method indicated that the PSE in the fast hand movement condition was significantly smaller than that in the no-motion condition (t(18) = 3.15, P < 0.05) and slow-hand-movement condition (t(18) = 2.81, P < 0.05). These results indicate that execution of fast hand movement compressed the perceived 200 ms interval. The obtained JNDs are shown in Fig 3B. A one-way repeated measures ANOVA indicated no significant effect of hand movement speed (F(3, 24) = 1.12, P = 0.37, η2 = 0.08). These results indicate that execution of hand movement did not affect the precision of judgments.

Bottom Line: The results show that hand movements, at least the fast ones, reduced the apparent time interval between visual events.A control experiment indicated that the apparent time compression was not produced by the participants' involuntary eye movements during the hand movements.These results, together with earlier findings, suggest hand movement can change apparent visual time either in a compressive way or in an expansive way, depending on the relative timing between the hand movement and visual stimulus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NTT Communication Science Laboratories, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation, Kanagawa, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The influence of body movements on visual time perception is receiving increased attention. Past studies showed apparent expansion of visual time before and after the execution of hand movements and apparent compression of visual time during the execution of eye movements. Here we examined whether the estimation of sub-second time intervals between visual events is expanded, compressed, or unaffected during the execution of hand movements. The results show that hand movements, at least the fast ones, reduced the apparent time interval between visual events. A control experiment indicated that the apparent time compression was not produced by the participants' involuntary eye movements during the hand movements. These results, together with earlier findings, suggest hand movement can change apparent visual time either in a compressive way or in an expansive way, depending on the relative timing between the hand movement and visual stimulus.

No MeSH data available.