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Apparent time interval of visual stimuli is compressed during fast hand movement.

Yokosaka T, Kuroki S, Nishida S, Watanabe J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: The results show that hand movements, at least the fast ones, reduced the apparent time interval between visual events.A control experiment indicated that the apparent time compression was not produced by the participants' involuntary eye movements during the hand movements.These results, together with earlier findings, suggest hand movement can change apparent visual time either in a compressive way or in an expansive way, depending on the relative timing between the hand movement and visual stimulus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NTT Communication Science Laboratories, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation, Kanagawa, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The influence of body movements on visual time perception is receiving increased attention. Past studies showed apparent expansion of visual time before and after the execution of hand movements and apparent compression of visual time during the execution of eye movements. Here we examined whether the estimation of sub-second time intervals between visual events is expanded, compressed, or unaffected during the execution of hand movements. The results show that hand movements, at least the fast ones, reduced the apparent time interval between visual events. A control experiment indicated that the apparent time compression was not produced by the participants' involuntary eye movements during the hand movements. These results, together with earlier findings, suggest hand movement can change apparent visual time either in a compressive way or in an expansive way, depending on the relative timing between the hand movement and visual stimulus.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic illustration of the experimental setup and time course.(A) Experimental setup. (B) Time course of a stimulus for the experimental conditions.
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pone.0124901.g001: Schematic illustration of the experimental setup and time course.(A) Experimental setup. (B) Time course of a stimulus for the experimental conditions.

Mentions: In each trial of our experiment, two pairs of visual stimuli were presented sequentially. The interval between the two stimuli of the first pair (test interval) was fixed at 200 ms; that between the two stimuli of the second one (probe interval) was varied. Participants moved their right hand circularly around the fixation point at a constant speed [zero (no motion), slow, intermediate, or fast] when observing the test interval (as shown in Fig 1A, a mirror prevented them from viewing their hands and arms) and immediately stopped the hand movement when observing the probe interval. They made a judgment as to the relative length of temporal intervals defined by the two visual flashes (Fig 1B).


Apparent time interval of visual stimuli is compressed during fast hand movement.

Yokosaka T, Kuroki S, Nishida S, Watanabe J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Schematic illustration of the experimental setup and time course.(A) Experimental setup. (B) Time course of a stimulus for the experimental conditions.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390366&req=5

pone.0124901.g001: Schematic illustration of the experimental setup and time course.(A) Experimental setup. (B) Time course of a stimulus for the experimental conditions.
Mentions: In each trial of our experiment, two pairs of visual stimuli were presented sequentially. The interval between the two stimuli of the first pair (test interval) was fixed at 200 ms; that between the two stimuli of the second one (probe interval) was varied. Participants moved their right hand circularly around the fixation point at a constant speed [zero (no motion), slow, intermediate, or fast] when observing the test interval (as shown in Fig 1A, a mirror prevented them from viewing their hands and arms) and immediately stopped the hand movement when observing the probe interval. They made a judgment as to the relative length of temporal intervals defined by the two visual flashes (Fig 1B).

Bottom Line: The results show that hand movements, at least the fast ones, reduced the apparent time interval between visual events.A control experiment indicated that the apparent time compression was not produced by the participants' involuntary eye movements during the hand movements.These results, together with earlier findings, suggest hand movement can change apparent visual time either in a compressive way or in an expansive way, depending on the relative timing between the hand movement and visual stimulus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NTT Communication Science Laboratories, Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation, Kanagawa, Japan.

ABSTRACT
The influence of body movements on visual time perception is receiving increased attention. Past studies showed apparent expansion of visual time before and after the execution of hand movements and apparent compression of visual time during the execution of eye movements. Here we examined whether the estimation of sub-second time intervals between visual events is expanded, compressed, or unaffected during the execution of hand movements. The results show that hand movements, at least the fast ones, reduced the apparent time interval between visual events. A control experiment indicated that the apparent time compression was not produced by the participants' involuntary eye movements during the hand movements. These results, together with earlier findings, suggest hand movement can change apparent visual time either in a compressive way or in an expansive way, depending on the relative timing between the hand movement and visual stimulus.

No MeSH data available.