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Back to the roots: the integration of a constructed wetland into a recirculating hatchery - a case study.

Buřič M, Bláhovec J, Kouřil J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Concretely, the use of constructed wetland allows the rearing about 40% more fish biomass, resulting in higher production and profitability.Constructed wetlands could enhance the productivity of existing small scale facilities, as well as larger systems, to address economic and environmental issues in aquaculture.Such systems have potential to be sustainable in the context of possible future climate change and resource limitations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of South Bohemia in Ceske Budejovice, Faculty of Fisheries and Protection of Waters, South Bohemian Research Center of Aquaculture and Biodiversity of Hydrocenoses, Vodňany, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
Aquaculture is currently one of the fastest growing food-producing sectors, accounting for around 50% of the world's food fish. Limited resources, together with climatic change, have stimulated the search for solutions to support and sustain the production of fish as a nutritious food. The integration of a constructed wetland (CW) into a recirculating hatchery (RHS) was evaluated with respect to its economic feasibility and environmental impact. The outcome of eight production cycles showed the potential of CW integration for expanded production without increased operation costs or environmental load. Concretely, the use of constructed wetland allows the rearing about 40% more fish biomass, resulting in higher production and profitability. The low requirements for space, fresh water, and energy enable the establishment of such systems almost anywhere. Constructed wetlands could enhance the productivity of existing small scale facilities, as well as larger systems, to address economic and environmental issues in aquaculture. Such systems have potential to be sustainable in the context of possible future climate change and resource limitations.

No MeSH data available.


Schematic of recirculating hatchery system with the integrated constructed wetland: 1—fish tanks, 2—biofiltration/sedimentation unit, 3—circulation pump, 4—retention tank, 5—fresh water inlet, 6—ball valve, 7—constructed wetland (with the detail of water flow through tanks).Four water sampling sites are labelled: IF—inlet to fish tanks, OF—outlet from fish tanks, OB—outlet from biofilter, ICW—inlet to constructed wetland, OCW—outlet from constructed wetland, OP—outflow pipes, CP—connecting pipes for subsurface flow.
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pone.0123577.g001: Schematic of recirculating hatchery system with the integrated constructed wetland: 1—fish tanks, 2—biofiltration/sedimentation unit, 3—circulation pump, 4—retention tank, 5—fresh water inlet, 6—ball valve, 7—constructed wetland (with the detail of water flow through tanks).Four water sampling sites are labelled: IF—inlet to fish tanks, OF—outlet from fish tanks, OB—outlet from biofilter, ICW—inlet to constructed wetland, OCW—outlet from constructed wetland, OP—outflow pipes, CP—connecting pipes for subsurface flow.

Mentions: The study was conducted at a small trout farm in the Czech Republic (49°6'35" N, 13°45'10" E) where the simple recirculating hatchery system (RHS) with total energy consumption of 1.6 kW and overall fresh water demand of 0.05 L sec-1 was developed and tested in the past[15]. The RHS consisted of two separate systems in an area of ~65 m2. The first system was used for egg incubation, hatching, and rearing through the change to exogenous feeding to a fish weight of ~0.50 g. This system was the source of fry that were used for evaluation of the second system with or without an incorporated constructed wetland (CW). This second system was equipped with seven circular tanks (~0.7 m3); one biofiltration/sedimentation unit (~2.2 m3) with 12 bioblocs (EXPO-NET A/S, Denmark); one retention tank (~3.5 m3); and a circulation pump (0.75 kW, Wilo SE, Germany). Six tanks containing 1.4 m3 of inert substrate (LIAFLOR, LIAS Vintirov, Czech Republic) planted with Phalaris arundinacea served as the body of the CW. The tanks were arranged horizontally with a cascading flow (Fig 1). A ball valve at the height of the inlet to the CW enabled operation of the system with or without the CW, so there was no need for additional pumps or supplemental power. During operation with the CW, one third (~ 6 L s-1) of the total water flow was directed through the CW; hence the volume of water passing through the CW was 21.6 m3 h-1, and the total volume of the system (10.6 m3) passed through the CW more than twice each hour. Source of fresh water was a borehole.


Back to the roots: the integration of a constructed wetland into a recirculating hatchery - a case study.

Buřič M, Bláhovec J, Kouřil J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Schematic of recirculating hatchery system with the integrated constructed wetland: 1—fish tanks, 2—biofiltration/sedimentation unit, 3—circulation pump, 4—retention tank, 5—fresh water inlet, 6—ball valve, 7—constructed wetland (with the detail of water flow through tanks).Four water sampling sites are labelled: IF—inlet to fish tanks, OF—outlet from fish tanks, OB—outlet from biofilter, ICW—inlet to constructed wetland, OCW—outlet from constructed wetland, OP—outflow pipes, CP—connecting pipes for subsurface flow.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390338&req=5

pone.0123577.g001: Schematic of recirculating hatchery system with the integrated constructed wetland: 1—fish tanks, 2—biofiltration/sedimentation unit, 3—circulation pump, 4—retention tank, 5—fresh water inlet, 6—ball valve, 7—constructed wetland (with the detail of water flow through tanks).Four water sampling sites are labelled: IF—inlet to fish tanks, OF—outlet from fish tanks, OB—outlet from biofilter, ICW—inlet to constructed wetland, OCW—outlet from constructed wetland, OP—outflow pipes, CP—connecting pipes for subsurface flow.
Mentions: The study was conducted at a small trout farm in the Czech Republic (49°6'35" N, 13°45'10" E) where the simple recirculating hatchery system (RHS) with total energy consumption of 1.6 kW and overall fresh water demand of 0.05 L sec-1 was developed and tested in the past[15]. The RHS consisted of two separate systems in an area of ~65 m2. The first system was used for egg incubation, hatching, and rearing through the change to exogenous feeding to a fish weight of ~0.50 g. This system was the source of fry that were used for evaluation of the second system with or without an incorporated constructed wetland (CW). This second system was equipped with seven circular tanks (~0.7 m3); one biofiltration/sedimentation unit (~2.2 m3) with 12 bioblocs (EXPO-NET A/S, Denmark); one retention tank (~3.5 m3); and a circulation pump (0.75 kW, Wilo SE, Germany). Six tanks containing 1.4 m3 of inert substrate (LIAFLOR, LIAS Vintirov, Czech Republic) planted with Phalaris arundinacea served as the body of the CW. The tanks were arranged horizontally with a cascading flow (Fig 1). A ball valve at the height of the inlet to the CW enabled operation of the system with or without the CW, so there was no need for additional pumps or supplemental power. During operation with the CW, one third (~ 6 L s-1) of the total water flow was directed through the CW; hence the volume of water passing through the CW was 21.6 m3 h-1, and the total volume of the system (10.6 m3) passed through the CW more than twice each hour. Source of fresh water was a borehole.

Bottom Line: Concretely, the use of constructed wetland allows the rearing about 40% more fish biomass, resulting in higher production and profitability.Constructed wetlands could enhance the productivity of existing small scale facilities, as well as larger systems, to address economic and environmental issues in aquaculture.Such systems have potential to be sustainable in the context of possible future climate change and resource limitations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of South Bohemia in Ceske Budejovice, Faculty of Fisheries and Protection of Waters, South Bohemian Research Center of Aquaculture and Biodiversity of Hydrocenoses, Vodňany, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
Aquaculture is currently one of the fastest growing food-producing sectors, accounting for around 50% of the world's food fish. Limited resources, together with climatic change, have stimulated the search for solutions to support and sustain the production of fish as a nutritious food. The integration of a constructed wetland (CW) into a recirculating hatchery (RHS) was evaluated with respect to its economic feasibility and environmental impact. The outcome of eight production cycles showed the potential of CW integration for expanded production without increased operation costs or environmental load. Concretely, the use of constructed wetland allows the rearing about 40% more fish biomass, resulting in higher production and profitability. The low requirements for space, fresh water, and energy enable the establishment of such systems almost anywhere. Constructed wetlands could enhance the productivity of existing small scale facilities, as well as larger systems, to address economic and environmental issues in aquaculture. Such systems have potential to be sustainable in the context of possible future climate change and resource limitations.

No MeSH data available.