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Reduced gaze following and attention to heads when viewing a "live" social scene.

Gregory NJ, Lόpez B, Graham G, Marshman P, Bate S, Kargas N - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Results demonstrated that the social context in which the stimulus was viewed significantly influenced viewing behaviour.Specifically, participants in the social conditions allocated less visual attention towards the heads of the actors in the scene and followed their gaze less than those in the free-viewing group.These findings suggest that by underestimating the impact of social context in social attention, researchers risk coming to inaccurate conclusions about how we attend to others in the real world.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Psychology Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Technology, Bournemouth University, Poole, Dorset, United Kingdom; Department of Psychology, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Hampshire, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Social stimuli are known to both attract and direct our attention, but most research on social attention has been conducted in highly controlled laboratory settings lacking in social context. This study examined the role of social context on viewing behaviour of participants whilst they watched a dynamic social scene, under three different conditions. In two social groups, participants believed they were watching a live webcam of other participants. The socially-engaged group believed they would later complete a group task with the people in the video, whilst the non-engaged group believed they would not meet the people in the scene. In a third condition, participants simply free-viewed the same video with the knowledge that it was pre-recorded, with no suggestion of a later interaction. Results demonstrated that the social context in which the stimulus was viewed significantly influenced viewing behaviour. Specifically, participants in the social conditions allocated less visual attention towards the heads of the actors in the scene and followed their gaze less than those in the free-viewing group. These findings suggest that by underestimating the impact of social context in social attention, researchers risk coming to inaccurate conclusions about how we attend to others in the real world.

No MeSH data available.


Mean proportion dwell time to the target interest areas before and after the gaze shifts across the three groups.Error bars represent standard error of the mean. Brackets indicate a significant difference at the p = .05 level.
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pone.0121792.g005: Mean proportion dwell time to the target interest areas before and after the gaze shifts across the three groups.Error bars represent standard error of the mean. Brackets indicate a significant difference at the p = .05 level.

Mentions: A significant main effect of Period was found, F (1,68) = 30.89, p <. 001, η2p = .312, with greater proportion of dwell time allocated to the target interest areas after the gaze shifts than before the gaze shifts. There was a significant main effect of Group on dwell time to the targets overall, F (1,68) = 3.38, p = .040, η2p = .090, with the free-viewing group spending longer looking at the targets overall than the non-engaged group, p = .016, with a similar difference which approached significance in the engaged group, p = .066. There was a significant interaction between Period and Group, F (2, 68) = 5.22, p = .008, η2p = .133. Planned comparisons showed that both the engaged, p = .018, and the free-viewing groups, p <. 001, spent longer looking at the gazed-at target after the shift than before, but there was no difference between the two periods in the non-engaged group, p = .161 (Fig. 5). None of the other interactions approached significance, ps >. 130.


Reduced gaze following and attention to heads when viewing a "live" social scene.

Gregory NJ, Lόpez B, Graham G, Marshman P, Bate S, Kargas N - PLoS ONE (2015)

Mean proportion dwell time to the target interest areas before and after the gaze shifts across the three groups.Error bars represent standard error of the mean. Brackets indicate a significant difference at the p = .05 level.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390321&req=5

pone.0121792.g005: Mean proportion dwell time to the target interest areas before and after the gaze shifts across the three groups.Error bars represent standard error of the mean. Brackets indicate a significant difference at the p = .05 level.
Mentions: A significant main effect of Period was found, F (1,68) = 30.89, p <. 001, η2p = .312, with greater proportion of dwell time allocated to the target interest areas after the gaze shifts than before the gaze shifts. There was a significant main effect of Group on dwell time to the targets overall, F (1,68) = 3.38, p = .040, η2p = .090, with the free-viewing group spending longer looking at the targets overall than the non-engaged group, p = .016, with a similar difference which approached significance in the engaged group, p = .066. There was a significant interaction between Period and Group, F (2, 68) = 5.22, p = .008, η2p = .133. Planned comparisons showed that both the engaged, p = .018, and the free-viewing groups, p <. 001, spent longer looking at the gazed-at target after the shift than before, but there was no difference between the two periods in the non-engaged group, p = .161 (Fig. 5). None of the other interactions approached significance, ps >. 130.

Bottom Line: Results demonstrated that the social context in which the stimulus was viewed significantly influenced viewing behaviour.Specifically, participants in the social conditions allocated less visual attention towards the heads of the actors in the scene and followed their gaze less than those in the free-viewing group.These findings suggest that by underestimating the impact of social context in social attention, researchers risk coming to inaccurate conclusions about how we attend to others in the real world.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Psychology Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Technology, Bournemouth University, Poole, Dorset, United Kingdom; Department of Psychology, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Hampshire, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Social stimuli are known to both attract and direct our attention, but most research on social attention has been conducted in highly controlled laboratory settings lacking in social context. This study examined the role of social context on viewing behaviour of participants whilst they watched a dynamic social scene, under three different conditions. In two social groups, participants believed they were watching a live webcam of other participants. The socially-engaged group believed they would later complete a group task with the people in the video, whilst the non-engaged group believed they would not meet the people in the scene. In a third condition, participants simply free-viewed the same video with the knowledge that it was pre-recorded, with no suggestion of a later interaction. Results demonstrated that the social context in which the stimulus was viewed significantly influenced viewing behaviour. Specifically, participants in the social conditions allocated less visual attention towards the heads of the actors in the scene and followed their gaze less than those in the free-viewing group. These findings suggest that by underestimating the impact of social context in social attention, researchers risk coming to inaccurate conclusions about how we attend to others in the real world.

No MeSH data available.