Limits...
Reduced gaze following and attention to heads when viewing a "live" social scene.

Gregory NJ, Lόpez B, Graham G, Marshman P, Bate S, Kargas N - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Results demonstrated that the social context in which the stimulus was viewed significantly influenced viewing behaviour.Specifically, participants in the social conditions allocated less visual attention towards the heads of the actors in the scene and followed their gaze less than those in the free-viewing group.These findings suggest that by underestimating the impact of social context in social attention, researchers risk coming to inaccurate conclusions about how we attend to others in the real world.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Psychology Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Technology, Bournemouth University, Poole, Dorset, United Kingdom; Department of Psychology, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Hampshire, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Social stimuli are known to both attract and direct our attention, but most research on social attention has been conducted in highly controlled laboratory settings lacking in social context. This study examined the role of social context on viewing behaviour of participants whilst they watched a dynamic social scene, under three different conditions. In two social groups, participants believed they were watching a live webcam of other participants. The socially-engaged group believed they would later complete a group task with the people in the video, whilst the non-engaged group believed they would not meet the people in the scene. In a third condition, participants simply free-viewed the same video with the knowledge that it was pre-recorded, with no suggestion of a later interaction. Results demonstrated that the social context in which the stimulus was viewed significantly influenced viewing behaviour. Specifically, participants in the social conditions allocated less visual attention towards the heads of the actors in the scene and followed their gaze less than those in the free-viewing group. These findings suggest that by underestimating the impact of social context in social attention, researchers risk coming to inaccurate conclusions about how we attend to others in the real world.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Interest areas (IAs) drawn using Dataviewer (SR Research) recreated in Corel Paint Shop Pro X for publication purposes.Note that for the general viewing behaviour analysis, the IA Background encompassed all IAs except the bodies and heads of the actors. Also note that a magazine being turned by an off-screen actor was present in the Magazine IA on one gaze shift only.
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pone.0121792.g002: Interest areas (IAs) drawn using Dataviewer (SR Research) recreated in Corel Paint Shop Pro X for publication purposes.Note that for the general viewing behaviour analysis, the IA Background encompassed all IAs except the bodies and heads of the actors. Also note that a magazine being turned by an off-screen actor was present in the Magazine IA on one gaze shift only.

Mentions: The actors moved very little during the critical periods of the video, save for the movements involved in the gaze shifts themselves and small movements of the body whilst turning pages of a magazine or interacting with a mobile phone. It was therefore possible to draw static interest areas around the important areas of the scene using Dataviewer (SR Research) which included small margins of approximately 20 pixels around the actors’ heads and bodies to allow for any movement that occurred during the gaze shifts. Aside from the interest areas drawn around the heads and bodies of the actors, for which the free-hand interest area tool was used, rectangular interest areas were drawn around the target areas of the scene, namely the bookshelf, the door and the area where the magazine briefly appeared when turned by an off-screen actor, as well as one large rectangular area drawn around the video window itself, which encompassed all elements of the scene. As the target objects were ambiguous and out of shot at the point of the gaze shift (e.g. person coming down corridor to eventually enter the door), the interest areas drawn around the eventual target areas were extended by a margin of 50 pixels in all directions to take into account participants’ uncertainty about the exact target of the gaze shift. The less desirable alternative was that these saccades would land in unanalysed areas of the screen, despite them clearly being the result of the gaze shift of the actor and therefore would be missed from the analyses. Interest areas can be seen in Fig. 2.


Reduced gaze following and attention to heads when viewing a "live" social scene.

Gregory NJ, Lόpez B, Graham G, Marshman P, Bate S, Kargas N - PLoS ONE (2015)

Interest areas (IAs) drawn using Dataviewer (SR Research) recreated in Corel Paint Shop Pro X for publication purposes.Note that for the general viewing behaviour analysis, the IA Background encompassed all IAs except the bodies and heads of the actors. Also note that a magazine being turned by an off-screen actor was present in the Magazine IA on one gaze shift only.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390321&req=5

pone.0121792.g002: Interest areas (IAs) drawn using Dataviewer (SR Research) recreated in Corel Paint Shop Pro X for publication purposes.Note that for the general viewing behaviour analysis, the IA Background encompassed all IAs except the bodies and heads of the actors. Also note that a magazine being turned by an off-screen actor was present in the Magazine IA on one gaze shift only.
Mentions: The actors moved very little during the critical periods of the video, save for the movements involved in the gaze shifts themselves and small movements of the body whilst turning pages of a magazine or interacting with a mobile phone. It was therefore possible to draw static interest areas around the important areas of the scene using Dataviewer (SR Research) which included small margins of approximately 20 pixels around the actors’ heads and bodies to allow for any movement that occurred during the gaze shifts. Aside from the interest areas drawn around the heads and bodies of the actors, for which the free-hand interest area tool was used, rectangular interest areas were drawn around the target areas of the scene, namely the bookshelf, the door and the area where the magazine briefly appeared when turned by an off-screen actor, as well as one large rectangular area drawn around the video window itself, which encompassed all elements of the scene. As the target objects were ambiguous and out of shot at the point of the gaze shift (e.g. person coming down corridor to eventually enter the door), the interest areas drawn around the eventual target areas were extended by a margin of 50 pixels in all directions to take into account participants’ uncertainty about the exact target of the gaze shift. The less desirable alternative was that these saccades would land in unanalysed areas of the screen, despite them clearly being the result of the gaze shift of the actor and therefore would be missed from the analyses. Interest areas can be seen in Fig. 2.

Bottom Line: Results demonstrated that the social context in which the stimulus was viewed significantly influenced viewing behaviour.Specifically, participants in the social conditions allocated less visual attention towards the heads of the actors in the scene and followed their gaze less than those in the free-viewing group.These findings suggest that by underestimating the impact of social context in social attention, researchers risk coming to inaccurate conclusions about how we attend to others in the real world.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Psychology Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Technology, Bournemouth University, Poole, Dorset, United Kingdom; Department of Psychology, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, Hampshire, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Social stimuli are known to both attract and direct our attention, but most research on social attention has been conducted in highly controlled laboratory settings lacking in social context. This study examined the role of social context on viewing behaviour of participants whilst they watched a dynamic social scene, under three different conditions. In two social groups, participants believed they were watching a live webcam of other participants. The socially-engaged group believed they would later complete a group task with the people in the video, whilst the non-engaged group believed they would not meet the people in the scene. In a third condition, participants simply free-viewed the same video with the knowledge that it was pre-recorded, with no suggestion of a later interaction. Results demonstrated that the social context in which the stimulus was viewed significantly influenced viewing behaviour. Specifically, participants in the social conditions allocated less visual attention towards the heads of the actors in the scene and followed their gaze less than those in the free-viewing group. These findings suggest that by underestimating the impact of social context in social attention, researchers risk coming to inaccurate conclusions about how we attend to others in the real world.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus