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Expectant parents' understanding of the implications and management of fever in the neonate.

Ahronheim SR, McGillivray D, Barbic S, Barbic D, Klam S, Brisebois P, Lambrinakos-Raymond K, Nemeth J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Among the 355 respondents, (response rate 87%) we found that 75% of parents reported that they would take their febrile neonate for immediate medical assessment, with nearly one fifth of the sample reporting that they would not seek medical care.We found no significant associations between the choice to seek medical care and expectant parents socio-demographic characteristics.This may improve neonatal health outcomes in Canada.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Emergency Medicine, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Canada; Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Montreal Children's Hospital of the McGill University Hospital Centre, Montreal, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Objective: We estimated the extent to which Canadian expectant parents would seek medical care in a febrile neonate (age 30 days or less). We also evaluated expectant parents' knowledge of signs and symptoms of fever in a neonate, and explored the actions Canadian expectant parents would take to optimize the health of their child.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of a sample of expectant parents from a large urban center in Canada. We recruited participants from waiting rooms in an obstetrical ultrasound clinic located in an urban tertiary care hospital in Montreal, Canada. We asked participants nine questions about fever in neonates including if, and how, they would seek care for their neonate if they suspected he/she were febrile.

Results: Among the 355 respondents, (response rate 87%) we found that 75% of parents reported that they would take their febrile neonate for immediate medical assessment, with nearly one fifth of the sample reporting that they would not seek medical care. We found no significant associations between the choice to seek medical care and expectant parents socio-demographic characteristics.

Conclusions: Despite universal access to high quality health care in Canada, our study highlights concerning gaps in the knowledge of the care of the febrile infant in one fifth of expectant parents. Physicians and health providers should strive to provide early education to expectant parents about how to recognize signs of fever in the neonate and how best to seek medical care. This may improve neonatal health outcomes in Canada.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Response pattern of parents to questions about fever (% correct or partially correct).
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pone.0120959.g002: Response pattern of parents to questions about fever (% correct or partially correct).

Mentions: The first objective was to estimate the extent to which Canadian expectant parents would seek medical care in a febrile neonate (age 30 days or less). Fig 2 summarizes expectant parents’ knowledge of fever. We found that 75% of expectant parents in this study would bring their child to seek medical care if they suspected fever. Nearly one fifth of parents (17%) reported that they would not take their neonate to seek medical care if they suspected a fever. We found that 28 individuals (8%) did not answer this question. As shown in Table 2, we found no significant associations between the choice to seek medical care and any socio-demographic variables.


Expectant parents' understanding of the implications and management of fever in the neonate.

Ahronheim SR, McGillivray D, Barbic S, Barbic D, Klam S, Brisebois P, Lambrinakos-Raymond K, Nemeth J - PLoS ONE (2015)

Response pattern of parents to questions about fever (% correct or partially correct).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390280&req=5

pone.0120959.g002: Response pattern of parents to questions about fever (% correct or partially correct).
Mentions: The first objective was to estimate the extent to which Canadian expectant parents would seek medical care in a febrile neonate (age 30 days or less). Fig 2 summarizes expectant parents’ knowledge of fever. We found that 75% of expectant parents in this study would bring their child to seek medical care if they suspected fever. Nearly one fifth of parents (17%) reported that they would not take their neonate to seek medical care if they suspected a fever. We found that 28 individuals (8%) did not answer this question. As shown in Table 2, we found no significant associations between the choice to seek medical care and any socio-demographic variables.

Bottom Line: Among the 355 respondents, (response rate 87%) we found that 75% of parents reported that they would take their febrile neonate for immediate medical assessment, with nearly one fifth of the sample reporting that they would not seek medical care.We found no significant associations between the choice to seek medical care and expectant parents socio-demographic characteristics.This may improve neonatal health outcomes in Canada.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Emergency Medicine, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Canada; Division of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Montreal Children's Hospital of the McGill University Hospital Centre, Montreal, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Objective: We estimated the extent to which Canadian expectant parents would seek medical care in a febrile neonate (age 30 days or less). We also evaluated expectant parents' knowledge of signs and symptoms of fever in a neonate, and explored the actions Canadian expectant parents would take to optimize the health of their child.

Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of a sample of expectant parents from a large urban center in Canada. We recruited participants from waiting rooms in an obstetrical ultrasound clinic located in an urban tertiary care hospital in Montreal, Canada. We asked participants nine questions about fever in neonates including if, and how, they would seek care for their neonate if they suspected he/she were febrile.

Results: Among the 355 respondents, (response rate 87%) we found that 75% of parents reported that they would take their febrile neonate for immediate medical assessment, with nearly one fifth of the sample reporting that they would not seek medical care. We found no significant associations between the choice to seek medical care and expectant parents socio-demographic characteristics.

Conclusions: Despite universal access to high quality health care in Canada, our study highlights concerning gaps in the knowledge of the care of the febrile infant in one fifth of expectant parents. Physicians and health providers should strive to provide early education to expectant parents about how to recognize signs of fever in the neonate and how best to seek medical care. This may improve neonatal health outcomes in Canada.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus