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Synchronous rhythmic interaction enhances children's perceived similarity and closeness towards each other.

Rabinowitch TC, Knafo-Noam A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: This effect has been demonstrated in adults, but it is unknown whether synchrony might have a similar impact on the social attitudes of children.We found that children who had participated in a synchronous interaction regarded their interacting partner as more similar and closer to themselves than children who had not interacted at all or who had taken part in an asynchronous interaction.These findings reveal that synchronous interaction can positively alter social attitudes between interacting children, suggesting a potential mechanism by which synchrony may enhance positive social interaction through attitudinal shift.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel; Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Inter-personal synchronization is important for performing many cooperative tasks. Notably, synchrony has also been shown to have considerable positive social influences, possibly mediated by synchrony-induced changes in social attitude such as an increased sense of similarity and affiliation between interacting individuals. This effect has been demonstrated in adults, but it is unknown whether synchrony might have a similar impact on the social attitudes of children. We thus set to directly examine the influence of synchronous rhythmic interaction on perceived similarity and closeness in pairs of 8-9 year old children. We found that children who had participated in a synchronous interaction regarded their interacting partner as more similar and closer to themselves than children who had not interacted at all or who had taken part in an asynchronous interaction. These findings reveal that synchronous interaction can positively alter social attitudes between interacting children, suggesting a potential mechanism by which synchrony may enhance positive social interaction through attitudinal shift.

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Mean Kreuz asynchrony score.(A), perceived similarity score (B) and perceived closeness score (C) for synchronous and asynchronous interactions, or no interaction. Error bars are the standard errors of the mean. *p<0.05, ***p<0.001 relative to synchrony condition in unpaired two-tailed t-tests not corrected for multiple comparisons.
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pone.0120878.g002: Mean Kreuz asynchrony score.(A), perceived similarity score (B) and perceived closeness score (C) for synchronous and asynchronous interactions, or no interaction. Error bars are the standard errors of the mean. *p<0.05, ***p<0.001 relative to synchrony condition in unpaired two-tailed t-tests not corrected for multiple comparisons.

Mentions: We sought to determine whether there was a difference in perceived similarity or closeness between child participants who had engaged in a synchronous versus asynchronous rhythmic interaction or had not engaged in any interaction at all. However, we first wished to confirm that interacting participants had indeed experienced the type of interaction designated for them. To this end we applied the Kreuz SPIKE-dist measure to the recorded tapping sequences (see Methods), and found that indeed, the intended asynchronous interactions received a significantly higher asynchrony score (M = 0.22, SD = 0.04) than the synchronous interactions (Fig. 2A; M = 0.15, SD = 0.06, t(51) = 4.26, p<0.001, d = 1.2).


Synchronous rhythmic interaction enhances children's perceived similarity and closeness towards each other.

Rabinowitch TC, Knafo-Noam A - PLoS ONE (2015)

Mean Kreuz asynchrony score.(A), perceived similarity score (B) and perceived closeness score (C) for synchronous and asynchronous interactions, or no interaction. Error bars are the standard errors of the mean. *p<0.05, ***p<0.001 relative to synchrony condition in unpaired two-tailed t-tests not corrected for multiple comparisons.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390221&req=5

pone.0120878.g002: Mean Kreuz asynchrony score.(A), perceived similarity score (B) and perceived closeness score (C) for synchronous and asynchronous interactions, or no interaction. Error bars are the standard errors of the mean. *p<0.05, ***p<0.001 relative to synchrony condition in unpaired two-tailed t-tests not corrected for multiple comparisons.
Mentions: We sought to determine whether there was a difference in perceived similarity or closeness between child participants who had engaged in a synchronous versus asynchronous rhythmic interaction or had not engaged in any interaction at all. However, we first wished to confirm that interacting participants had indeed experienced the type of interaction designated for them. To this end we applied the Kreuz SPIKE-dist measure to the recorded tapping sequences (see Methods), and found that indeed, the intended asynchronous interactions received a significantly higher asynchrony score (M = 0.22, SD = 0.04) than the synchronous interactions (Fig. 2A; M = 0.15, SD = 0.06, t(51) = 4.26, p<0.001, d = 1.2).

Bottom Line: This effect has been demonstrated in adults, but it is unknown whether synchrony might have a similar impact on the social attitudes of children.We found that children who had participated in a synchronous interaction regarded their interacting partner as more similar and closer to themselves than children who had not interacted at all or who had taken part in an asynchronous interaction.These findings reveal that synchronous interaction can positively alter social attitudes between interacting children, suggesting a potential mechanism by which synchrony may enhance positive social interaction through attitudinal shift.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem, Israel; Institute for Learning and Brain Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Inter-personal synchronization is important for performing many cooperative tasks. Notably, synchrony has also been shown to have considerable positive social influences, possibly mediated by synchrony-induced changes in social attitude such as an increased sense of similarity and affiliation between interacting individuals. This effect has been demonstrated in adults, but it is unknown whether synchrony might have a similar impact on the social attitudes of children. We thus set to directly examine the influence of synchronous rhythmic interaction on perceived similarity and closeness in pairs of 8-9 year old children. We found that children who had participated in a synchronous interaction regarded their interacting partner as more similar and closer to themselves than children who had not interacted at all or who had taken part in an asynchronous interaction. These findings reveal that synchronous interaction can positively alter social attitudes between interacting children, suggesting a potential mechanism by which synchrony may enhance positive social interaction through attitudinal shift.

Show MeSH