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Is that me or my twin? Lack of self-face recognition advantage in identical twins.

Martini M, Bufalari I, Stazi MA, Aglioti SM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Results show that twins equally recognize their own face and their twin's face.We speculate that in monozygotic twins, the visual representation of the self-face overlaps with that of the co-twin.Thus, to distinguish the self from the co-twin, monozygotic twins have to rely much more than control participants on the multisensory integration processes upon which the sense of bodily self is based.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Rome "La Sapienza," Via dei Marsi 78, 00185 Rome, Italy; IRCCS Fondazione Santa Lucia, Via Ardeatina 306, 00100 Rome, Italy; Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Carrer del Rosselló, 149, 08036 Barcelona, Spain; School of Psychology, University of East London, Water Lane, Stratford, London E15 4LZ, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Despite the increasing interest in twin studies and the stunning amount of research on face recognition, the ability of adult identical twins to discriminate their own faces from those of their co-twins has been scarcely investigated. One's own face is the most distinctive feature of the bodily self, and people typically show a clear advantage in recognizing their own face even more than other very familiar identities. Given the very high level of resemblance of their faces, monozygotic twins represent a unique model for exploring self-face processing. Herein we examined the ability of monozygotic twins to distinguish their own face from the face of their co-twin and of a highly familiar individual. Results show that twins equally recognize their own face and their twin's face. This lack of self-face advantage was negatively predicted by how much they felt physically similar to their co-twin and by their anxious or avoidant attachment style. We speculate that in monozygotic twins, the visual representation of the self-face overlaps with that of the co-twin. Thus, to distinguish the self from the co-twin, monozygotic twins have to rely much more than control participants on the multisensory integration processes upon which the sense of bodily self is based. Moreover, in keeping with the notion that attachment style influences perception of self and significant others, we propose that the observed self/co-twin confusion may depend upon insecure attachment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlations.A) Perceived Similarity and B) Insecure attachment (Preoccupation with Relationship (PwR); “Relationship as Secondary” (RaS) subscales of the Attachment Scale Questionnaire) were found to significantly predict the absence of self-face recognition advantage (normalized inverse efficiency scores mediated for upright and inverted Self-face, x-axes) in twins.
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pone.0120900.g003: Correlations.A) Perceived Similarity and B) Insecure attachment (Preoccupation with Relationship (PwR); “Relationship as Secondary” (RaS) subscales of the Attachment Scale Questionnaire) were found to significantly predict the absence of self-face recognition advantage (normalized inverse efficiency scores mediated for upright and inverted Self-face, x-axes) in twins.

Mentions: A standard regression model with “Interpersonal Perception” (‘Acquaintance’, ‘Frequentation’ and ‘Physical Resemblance’) as predictors were run on a self-recognition index (Self upright and upside-down normalized IE scores were mediated since results of the ANOVA showed that the absence of self-advantage was independent of stimuli orientation). After one outlier was removed (according to the Cook’s distance method [60]), the model showed to be significant (R2 = 0.49; F3,15 = 4.82; p = 0.015). Resemblance was the only significant variable. Indeed, the more the twins felt as if they physically resemble each other, the lower their performance at identifying their own face (B = -0.49; t(15) = -2.51; p = 0.024) (Fig. 3A). In other words, sharing highly similar physical features impaired twins’ ability to discriminate the self from the co-twin’s face.


Is that me or my twin? Lack of self-face recognition advantage in identical twins.

Martini M, Bufalari I, Stazi MA, Aglioti SM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Correlations.A) Perceived Similarity and B) Insecure attachment (Preoccupation with Relationship (PwR); “Relationship as Secondary” (RaS) subscales of the Attachment Scale Questionnaire) were found to significantly predict the absence of self-face recognition advantage (normalized inverse efficiency scores mediated for upright and inverted Self-face, x-axes) in twins.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390198&req=5

pone.0120900.g003: Correlations.A) Perceived Similarity and B) Insecure attachment (Preoccupation with Relationship (PwR); “Relationship as Secondary” (RaS) subscales of the Attachment Scale Questionnaire) were found to significantly predict the absence of self-face recognition advantage (normalized inverse efficiency scores mediated for upright and inverted Self-face, x-axes) in twins.
Mentions: A standard regression model with “Interpersonal Perception” (‘Acquaintance’, ‘Frequentation’ and ‘Physical Resemblance’) as predictors were run on a self-recognition index (Self upright and upside-down normalized IE scores were mediated since results of the ANOVA showed that the absence of self-advantage was independent of stimuli orientation). After one outlier was removed (according to the Cook’s distance method [60]), the model showed to be significant (R2 = 0.49; F3,15 = 4.82; p = 0.015). Resemblance was the only significant variable. Indeed, the more the twins felt as if they physically resemble each other, the lower their performance at identifying their own face (B = -0.49; t(15) = -2.51; p = 0.024) (Fig. 3A). In other words, sharing highly similar physical features impaired twins’ ability to discriminate the self from the co-twin’s face.

Bottom Line: Results show that twins equally recognize their own face and their twin's face.We speculate that in monozygotic twins, the visual representation of the self-face overlaps with that of the co-twin.Thus, to distinguish the self from the co-twin, monozygotic twins have to rely much more than control participants on the multisensory integration processes upon which the sense of bodily self is based.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Rome "La Sapienza," Via dei Marsi 78, 00185 Rome, Italy; IRCCS Fondazione Santa Lucia, Via Ardeatina 306, 00100 Rome, Italy; Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer (IDIBAPS), Carrer del Rosselló, 149, 08036 Barcelona, Spain; School of Psychology, University of East London, Water Lane, Stratford, London E15 4LZ, United Kingdom.

ABSTRACT
Despite the increasing interest in twin studies and the stunning amount of research on face recognition, the ability of adult identical twins to discriminate their own faces from those of their co-twins has been scarcely investigated. One's own face is the most distinctive feature of the bodily self, and people typically show a clear advantage in recognizing their own face even more than other very familiar identities. Given the very high level of resemblance of their faces, monozygotic twins represent a unique model for exploring self-face processing. Herein we examined the ability of monozygotic twins to distinguish their own face from the face of their co-twin and of a highly familiar individual. Results show that twins equally recognize their own face and their twin's face. This lack of self-face advantage was negatively predicted by how much they felt physically similar to their co-twin and by their anxious or avoidant attachment style. We speculate that in monozygotic twins, the visual representation of the self-face overlaps with that of the co-twin. Thus, to distinguish the self from the co-twin, monozygotic twins have to rely much more than control participants on the multisensory integration processes upon which the sense of bodily self is based. Moreover, in keeping with the notion that attachment style influences perception of self and significant others, we propose that the observed self/co-twin confusion may depend upon insecure attachment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus