Limits...
Nanoparticle properties and synthesis effects on surface-enhanced Raman scattering enhancement factor: an introduction.

Israelsen ND, Hanson C, Vargis E - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Bottom Line: However, the inherent insensitivity of the technique makes it difficult to use and statistically complicated.When Raman active molecules are near gold or silver nanoparticles, the Raman intensity is significantly amplified.This phenomenon is referred to as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Engineering, Utah State University, 4105 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322, USA.

ABSTRACT
Raman spectroscopy has enabled researchers to map the specific chemical makeup of surfaces, solutions, and even cells. However, the inherent insensitivity of the technique makes it difficult to use and statistically complicated. When Raman active molecules are near gold or silver nanoparticles, the Raman intensity is significantly amplified. This phenomenon is referred to as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The extent of SERS enhancement is due to a variety of factors such as nanoparticle size, shape, material, and configuration. The choice of Raman reporters and protective coatings will also influence SERS enhancement. This review provides an introduction to how these factors influence signal enhancement and how to optimize them during synthesis of SERS nanoparticles.

No MeSH data available.


Normalized extinction cross-sectional area for spherical gold nanoparticles of diameters ranging from 20–100 nm. Data was obtained from a Mie theory simulation available online [42].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390178&req=5

fig2: Normalized extinction cross-sectional area for spherical gold nanoparticles of diameters ranging from 20–100 nm. Data was obtained from a Mie theory simulation available online [42].

Mentions: Enhancement and LSPR dependency on size is demonstrated in Figure 2, which shows the theoretical (Mie theory) extinction cross section for gold spheres ranging from 20 to 100 nms in diameter. The Mie theory is the solution to the Maxwell equations for how light interacts with a spherical particle. The theory predicts that the smallest spheres have a maximum LSPR at shorter wavelengths. Details concerning the Mie theory can be found in literature and will not be covered here [43, 44]. The relationship between LSPR wavelength and particle size has also been demonstrated experimentally [45–47].


Nanoparticle properties and synthesis effects on surface-enhanced Raman scattering enhancement factor: an introduction.

Israelsen ND, Hanson C, Vargis E - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Normalized extinction cross-sectional area for spherical gold nanoparticles of diameters ranging from 20–100 nm. Data was obtained from a Mie theory simulation available online [42].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390178&req=5

fig2: Normalized extinction cross-sectional area for spherical gold nanoparticles of diameters ranging from 20–100 nm. Data was obtained from a Mie theory simulation available online [42].
Mentions: Enhancement and LSPR dependency on size is demonstrated in Figure 2, which shows the theoretical (Mie theory) extinction cross section for gold spheres ranging from 20 to 100 nms in diameter. The Mie theory is the solution to the Maxwell equations for how light interacts with a spherical particle. The theory predicts that the smallest spheres have a maximum LSPR at shorter wavelengths. Details concerning the Mie theory can be found in literature and will not be covered here [43, 44]. The relationship between LSPR wavelength and particle size has also been demonstrated experimentally [45–47].

Bottom Line: However, the inherent insensitivity of the technique makes it difficult to use and statistically complicated.When Raman active molecules are near gold or silver nanoparticles, the Raman intensity is significantly amplified.This phenomenon is referred to as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological Engineering, Utah State University, 4105 Old Main Hill, Logan, UT 84322, USA.

ABSTRACT
Raman spectroscopy has enabled researchers to map the specific chemical makeup of surfaces, solutions, and even cells. However, the inherent insensitivity of the technique makes it difficult to use and statistically complicated. When Raman active molecules are near gold or silver nanoparticles, the Raman intensity is significantly amplified. This phenomenon is referred to as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The extent of SERS enhancement is due to a variety of factors such as nanoparticle size, shape, material, and configuration. The choice of Raman reporters and protective coatings will also influence SERS enhancement. This review provides an introduction to how these factors influence signal enhancement and how to optimize them during synthesis of SERS nanoparticles.

No MeSH data available.