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Recent trends in rapid environmental monitoring of pathogens and toxicants: potential of nanoparticle-based biosensor and applications.

Koedrith P, Thasiphu T, Weon JI, Boonprasert R, Tuitemwong K, Tuitemwong P - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Bottom Line: The increase of cells to detection levels requires long incubation time.The major approach is to use nanoparticles as signal reporter to increase output rather than spending time to increase cell concentrations.Trends in future development of novel detection devices and their advantages over other environmental monitoring methodologies are also discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Environment and Resource Studies, Mahidol University, Phutthamonthon District, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

ABSTRACT
Of global concern, environmental pollution adversely affects human health and socioeconomic development. The presence of environmental contaminants, especially bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens and their toxins as well as chemical substances, poses serious public health concerns. Nanoparticle-based biosensors are considered as potential tools for rapid, specific, and highly sensitive detection of the analyte of interest (both biotic and abiotic contaminants). In particular, there are several limitations of conventional detection methods for water-borne pathogens due to low concentrations and interference with various enzymatic inhibitors in the environmental samples. The increase of cells to detection levels requires long incubation time. This review describes current state of biosensor nanotechnology, the advantage over conventional detection methods, and the challenges due to testing of environmental samples. The major approach is to use nanoparticles as signal reporter to increase output rather than spending time to increase cell concentrations. Trends in future development of novel detection devices and their advantages over other environmental monitoring methodologies are also discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Scheme depicting principle of biosensor-based detection using (a) gold nanoparticles and (b) quantum dots as well as (c) magnetic nanoparticle aggregates for detection of microcystin-LR (MC-LR), naturally occurring toxin produced from cyanobacteria.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig3: Scheme depicting principle of biosensor-based detection using (a) gold nanoparticles and (b) quantum dots as well as (c) magnetic nanoparticle aggregates for detection of microcystin-LR (MC-LR), naturally occurring toxin produced from cyanobacteria.

Mentions: Biosensor is defined as a device or an assay with use of a biorecognition element coupled to a signal transducer for measurement an analyte of interest [24]. Common biorecognition elements include oligonucleotide probes, antibodies, enzymes, aptamers, cell-surface molecules [25], and phages [26]. Transducers are divided into three main types: optical, electrochemical, and mechanical. As shown in Figure 3, schemes illustrate fundamental principle of biosensor-based detection: the full spectrum of biorecognition elements and transduction methods was reportedly established for detection of particular water-borne pathogens, with oligonucleotide probes and antibodies being the most common.


Recent trends in rapid environmental monitoring of pathogens and toxicants: potential of nanoparticle-based biosensor and applications.

Koedrith P, Thasiphu T, Weon JI, Boonprasert R, Tuitemwong K, Tuitemwong P - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Scheme depicting principle of biosensor-based detection using (a) gold nanoparticles and (b) quantum dots as well as (c) magnetic nanoparticle aggregates for detection of microcystin-LR (MC-LR), naturally occurring toxin produced from cyanobacteria.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390168&req=5

fig3: Scheme depicting principle of biosensor-based detection using (a) gold nanoparticles and (b) quantum dots as well as (c) magnetic nanoparticle aggregates for detection of microcystin-LR (MC-LR), naturally occurring toxin produced from cyanobacteria.
Mentions: Biosensor is defined as a device or an assay with use of a biorecognition element coupled to a signal transducer for measurement an analyte of interest [24]. Common biorecognition elements include oligonucleotide probes, antibodies, enzymes, aptamers, cell-surface molecules [25], and phages [26]. Transducers are divided into three main types: optical, electrochemical, and mechanical. As shown in Figure 3, schemes illustrate fundamental principle of biosensor-based detection: the full spectrum of biorecognition elements and transduction methods was reportedly established for detection of particular water-borne pathogens, with oligonucleotide probes and antibodies being the most common.

Bottom Line: The increase of cells to detection levels requires long incubation time.The major approach is to use nanoparticles as signal reporter to increase output rather than spending time to increase cell concentrations.Trends in future development of novel detection devices and their advantages over other environmental monitoring methodologies are also discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Environment and Resource Studies, Mahidol University, Phutthamonthon District, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

ABSTRACT
Of global concern, environmental pollution adversely affects human health and socioeconomic development. The presence of environmental contaminants, especially bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens and their toxins as well as chemical substances, poses serious public health concerns. Nanoparticle-based biosensors are considered as potential tools for rapid, specific, and highly sensitive detection of the analyte of interest (both biotic and abiotic contaminants). In particular, there are several limitations of conventional detection methods for water-borne pathogens due to low concentrations and interference with various enzymatic inhibitors in the environmental samples. The increase of cells to detection levels requires long incubation time. This review describes current state of biosensor nanotechnology, the advantage over conventional detection methods, and the challenges due to testing of environmental samples. The major approach is to use nanoparticles as signal reporter to increase output rather than spending time to increase cell concentrations. Trends in future development of novel detection devices and their advantages over other environmental monitoring methodologies are also discussed.

No MeSH data available.