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Recent trends in rapid environmental monitoring of pathogens and toxicants: potential of nanoparticle-based biosensor and applications.

Koedrith P, Thasiphu T, Weon JI, Boonprasert R, Tuitemwong K, Tuitemwong P - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Bottom Line: The increase of cells to detection levels requires long incubation time.The major approach is to use nanoparticles as signal reporter to increase output rather than spending time to increase cell concentrations.Trends in future development of novel detection devices and their advantages over other environmental monitoring methodologies are also discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Environment and Resource Studies, Mahidol University, Phutthamonthon District, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

ABSTRACT
Of global concern, environmental pollution adversely affects human health and socioeconomic development. The presence of environmental contaminants, especially bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens and their toxins as well as chemical substances, poses serious public health concerns. Nanoparticle-based biosensors are considered as potential tools for rapid, specific, and highly sensitive detection of the analyte of interest (both biotic and abiotic contaminants). In particular, there are several limitations of conventional detection methods for water-borne pathogens due to low concentrations and interference with various enzymatic inhibitors in the environmental samples. The increase of cells to detection levels requires long incubation time. This review describes current state of biosensor nanotechnology, the advantage over conventional detection methods, and the challenges due to testing of environmental samples. The major approach is to use nanoparticles as signal reporter to increase output rather than spending time to increase cell concentrations. Trends in future development of novel detection devices and their advantages over other environmental monitoring methodologies are also discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Scheme representing nanobiosensor components consisting of different bioreceptors (e.g., antibodies, aptamers, cell-surface molecules, enzymes, oligonucleotide probes, and phages) and major transducers depending on types of signal response (i.e., optical, electrochemical, and mechanical signal). Output can be displayed as UV-visible or photoluminescence spectra and magnetic resonance images.
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fig2: Scheme representing nanobiosensor components consisting of different bioreceptors (e.g., antibodies, aptamers, cell-surface molecules, enzymes, oligonucleotide probes, and phages) and major transducers depending on types of signal response (i.e., optical, electrochemical, and mechanical signal). Output can be displayed as UV-visible or photoluminescence spectra and magnetic resonance images.

Mentions: Biosensor is typically comprised of two main components: a bioreceptor and a transducer [21]. The bioreceptor is a biomolecule that recognizes the target analyte whereas the transducer converts the recognition event into a measurable signal. The bioreceptor is a biological molecular species (e.g., antibody, enzyme, and nucleic acid), a living biological system (e.g., cells, tissue, or whole organisms), or biomimetic material (e.g., synthetic bioreceptor) that utilizes a biochemical mechanism for recognition. The transducer is a device capable of converting a signal in one form to another form of energy. For transducer classification, common techniques include optical (e.g., luminescence and absorption), electrochemical (e.g., current and voltage), and mechanical measurements (e.g., magnetic resonance). In principle, the detection occurred by the specific binding of target analyte to the complementary biorecognition element (namely, bioreceptor) immobilized on an appropriate supportive medium. The specific interaction causes alteration in one or more physicochemical properties that is detectable using the second component, so-called transducer. Usually, magnitude of signal is proportionally related to the concentration of a specific analyte captured by the biorecognition element [22] (Figure 2).


Recent trends in rapid environmental monitoring of pathogens and toxicants: potential of nanoparticle-based biosensor and applications.

Koedrith P, Thasiphu T, Weon JI, Boonprasert R, Tuitemwong K, Tuitemwong P - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Scheme representing nanobiosensor components consisting of different bioreceptors (e.g., antibodies, aptamers, cell-surface molecules, enzymes, oligonucleotide probes, and phages) and major transducers depending on types of signal response (i.e., optical, electrochemical, and mechanical signal). Output can be displayed as UV-visible or photoluminescence spectra and magnetic resonance images.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390168&req=5

fig2: Scheme representing nanobiosensor components consisting of different bioreceptors (e.g., antibodies, aptamers, cell-surface molecules, enzymes, oligonucleotide probes, and phages) and major transducers depending on types of signal response (i.e., optical, electrochemical, and mechanical signal). Output can be displayed as UV-visible or photoluminescence spectra and magnetic resonance images.
Mentions: Biosensor is typically comprised of two main components: a bioreceptor and a transducer [21]. The bioreceptor is a biomolecule that recognizes the target analyte whereas the transducer converts the recognition event into a measurable signal. The bioreceptor is a biological molecular species (e.g., antibody, enzyme, and nucleic acid), a living biological system (e.g., cells, tissue, or whole organisms), or biomimetic material (e.g., synthetic bioreceptor) that utilizes a biochemical mechanism for recognition. The transducer is a device capable of converting a signal in one form to another form of energy. For transducer classification, common techniques include optical (e.g., luminescence and absorption), electrochemical (e.g., current and voltage), and mechanical measurements (e.g., magnetic resonance). In principle, the detection occurred by the specific binding of target analyte to the complementary biorecognition element (namely, bioreceptor) immobilized on an appropriate supportive medium. The specific interaction causes alteration in one or more physicochemical properties that is detectable using the second component, so-called transducer. Usually, magnitude of signal is proportionally related to the concentration of a specific analyte captured by the biorecognition element [22] (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: The increase of cells to detection levels requires long incubation time.The major approach is to use nanoparticles as signal reporter to increase output rather than spending time to increase cell concentrations.Trends in future development of novel detection devices and their advantages over other environmental monitoring methodologies are also discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Environment and Resource Studies, Mahidol University, Phutthamonthon District, Nakhon Pathom 73170, Thailand.

ABSTRACT
Of global concern, environmental pollution adversely affects human health and socioeconomic development. The presence of environmental contaminants, especially bacterial, viral, and parasitic pathogens and their toxins as well as chemical substances, poses serious public health concerns. Nanoparticle-based biosensors are considered as potential tools for rapid, specific, and highly sensitive detection of the analyte of interest (both biotic and abiotic contaminants). In particular, there are several limitations of conventional detection methods for water-borne pathogens due to low concentrations and interference with various enzymatic inhibitors in the environmental samples. The increase of cells to detection levels requires long incubation time. This review describes current state of biosensor nanotechnology, the advantage over conventional detection methods, and the challenges due to testing of environmental samples. The major approach is to use nanoparticles as signal reporter to increase output rather than spending time to increase cell concentrations. Trends in future development of novel detection devices and their advantages over other environmental monitoring methodologies are also discussed.

No MeSH data available.