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Improving preclinic preparation for patients with chronic conditions in quito, ecuador: a randomized controlled trial.

Rodriguez K, Kaselitz E, Wong J, Ligard S, Peck D, Hugo Mena V, Gordillo F, Serlin D, Heisler M - Int J Family Med (2015)

Bottom Line: Methods.Conclusions.For high-quality patient-centered primary care, it is important to develop and test innovative and scalable interventions for patients and physicians to make the best use of limited clinic time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.

ABSTRACT
Objectives. As in many settings, patients in community health centers in Ecuador do not complete previsit forms or receive assistance to identify questions and concerns they would like to address in brief clinic visits with physicians. We examined the comparative effectiveness of providing (1) a previsit form to complete; (2) a previsit form along with assistance in completing the form; and (3) usual care. Methods. Parallel, three-arm randomized controlled trial in two health centers serving indigent to low-income communities in Quito, Ecuador, among 199 adult patients who took medications for at least one chronic condition. Outcome measures were self-reported satisfaction with the visit, confidence in asking questions, and extent to which patients' objectives were met. Results. Patients who received assistance in completing a previsit form were more than twice as likely as participants in usual care to report achieving everything they wanted during their visit (AOR 2.2, P = 0.039). There were no differences in any outcomes between the groups who received the previsit form with no assistance and usual care. Conclusions. For high-quality patient-centered primary care, it is important to develop and test innovative and scalable interventions for patients and physicians to make the best use of limited clinic time.

No MeSH data available.


Intervention effects, Quito, Ecuador, 2011.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390100&req=5

fig2: Intervention effects, Quito, Ecuador, 2011.

Mentions: Figure 2 shows changes in study measures for participants between baseline and the postclinic visit measures and compares postclinic visit assessments among Group 1, Group 2, and Group 3. In analyses adjusting for gender, patients who received the revisit form along with assistance from a team member (Group 3) were more than twice as likely as participants in Group 1 to report that they had achieved everything they wanted during their visit (AOR 2.2, P = 0.039). While not statistically significant (P = 0.071) participants in Group 3 were 1.86 times as likely as Group 1 to report that they felt capable in their clinic visit of asking questions. Although a higher percentage of participants in Group 3 reported greater levels of satisfaction with their clinic visit than participants in Group 1, this difference also was not statistically significant. There were no differences between Groups 1 and 2 in any of our study outcome measures.


Improving preclinic preparation for patients with chronic conditions in quito, ecuador: a randomized controlled trial.

Rodriguez K, Kaselitz E, Wong J, Ligard S, Peck D, Hugo Mena V, Gordillo F, Serlin D, Heisler M - Int J Family Med (2015)

Intervention effects, Quito, Ecuador, 2011.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4390100&req=5

fig2: Intervention effects, Quito, Ecuador, 2011.
Mentions: Figure 2 shows changes in study measures for participants between baseline and the postclinic visit measures and compares postclinic visit assessments among Group 1, Group 2, and Group 3. In analyses adjusting for gender, patients who received the revisit form along with assistance from a team member (Group 3) were more than twice as likely as participants in Group 1 to report that they had achieved everything they wanted during their visit (AOR 2.2, P = 0.039). While not statistically significant (P = 0.071) participants in Group 3 were 1.86 times as likely as Group 1 to report that they felt capable in their clinic visit of asking questions. Although a higher percentage of participants in Group 3 reported greater levels of satisfaction with their clinic visit than participants in Group 1, this difference also was not statistically significant. There were no differences between Groups 1 and 2 in any of our study outcome measures.

Bottom Line: Methods.Conclusions.For high-quality patient-centered primary care, it is important to develop and test innovative and scalable interventions for patients and physicians to make the best use of limited clinic time.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.

ABSTRACT
Objectives. As in many settings, patients in community health centers in Ecuador do not complete previsit forms or receive assistance to identify questions and concerns they would like to address in brief clinic visits with physicians. We examined the comparative effectiveness of providing (1) a previsit form to complete; (2) a previsit form along with assistance in completing the form; and (3) usual care. Methods. Parallel, three-arm randomized controlled trial in two health centers serving indigent to low-income communities in Quito, Ecuador, among 199 adult patients who took medications for at least one chronic condition. Outcome measures were self-reported satisfaction with the visit, confidence in asking questions, and extent to which patients' objectives were met. Results. Patients who received assistance in completing a previsit form were more than twice as likely as participants in usual care to report achieving everything they wanted during their visit (AOR 2.2, P = 0.039). There were no differences in any outcomes between the groups who received the previsit form with no assistance and usual care. Conclusions. For high-quality patient-centered primary care, it is important to develop and test innovative and scalable interventions for patients and physicians to make the best use of limited clinic time.

No MeSH data available.