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Significantly lower nerve growth factor levels in patients with major depressive disorder than in healthy subjects: a meta-analysis and systematic review.

Chen YW, Lin PY, Tu KY, Cheng YS, Wu CK, Tseng PT - Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat (2015)

Bottom Line: We conducted a thorough literature search and compared peripheral NGF levels between MDD and HC through meta-analysis, and investigated possible confounding variables through meta-regression.The main result was that the NGF levels were significantly lower in MDD than in HCs and that this had an inverse correlation with mean age and disease severity.In addition, meta-analysis of four articles found that the peripheral NGF levels did not change significantly before and after treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, E-Da Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Since its discovery several decades ago, nerve growth factor (NGF) has been found to play roles in different areas, such as neurology, endocrinology, and immunology. There is some evidence linking NGF and psychiatry, including the role of NGF in subjects' response to stress, the alteration of NGF in different emotional states, and the penetration of NGF across the blood-brain barrier under specific conditions. There are many inconsistent findings regarding the differences in NGF in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) at the present time. The aim of our study was to clarify whether NGF levels are different in MDD compared with healthy controls (HCs).

Methods: We conducted a thorough literature search and compared peripheral NGF levels between MDD and HC through meta-analysis, and investigated possible confounding variables through meta-regression.

Results: Seven studies were brought into the current meta-analysis comparing peripheral NGF in MDD and HCs. The main result was that the NGF levels were significantly lower in MDD than in HCs and that this had an inverse correlation with mean age and disease severity. In addition, meta-analysis of four articles found that the peripheral NGF levels did not change significantly before and after treatment.

Conclusion: Our study highlights the significant differences in peripheral NGF levels in patients with MDD. However, further exploration of the dynamic changes in peripheral NGF along with the disease course, and specific studies investigating the correlation of NGF in the peripheral and CNS environments are still needed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) Forest plot of the meta-analysis of NGF in patients with MDD and in HCs. (B) Funnel plot of the meta-analysis of NGF in patients with MDD and in HCs.Notes: *The report by Pallavi et al22 also contained data of subjects who were in a “drug-free” state. P<0.05.Abbreviations: CI, confidence interval; HCs, healthy controls; MDD, major depressive disorder; NGF, nerve growth factor.
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f2-ndt-11-925: (A) Forest plot of the meta-analysis of NGF in patients with MDD and in HCs. (B) Funnel plot of the meta-analysis of NGF in patients with MDD and in HCs.Notes: *The report by Pallavi et al22 also contained data of subjects who were in a “drug-free” state. P<0.05.Abbreviations: CI, confidence interval; HCs, healthy controls; MDD, major depressive disorder; NGF, nerve growth factor.

Mentions: At this stage, we investigated the meta-analysis (1) studies, which compared only peripheral NGF levels in patients with MDD and in HCs. A total of 376 patients with MDD and 425 HCs were extracted from seven studies. The peripheral NGF protein levels were significantly lower in patients with MDD than in HCs (ES: −0.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.91 to −0.03, P=0.036) (Figure 2A). In addition, a significant heterogeneity within these studies was found (Q=49.1, df=6, I2=87.8%, P<0.001). Significant publication bias could also be detected, using Egger’s test (t=3.15, df=5, two-tailed, P=0.025) and visual examination of the funnel plot (Figure 2B).


Significantly lower nerve growth factor levels in patients with major depressive disorder than in healthy subjects: a meta-analysis and systematic review.

Chen YW, Lin PY, Tu KY, Cheng YS, Wu CK, Tseng PT - Neuropsychiatr Dis Treat (2015)

(A) Forest plot of the meta-analysis of NGF in patients with MDD and in HCs. (B) Funnel plot of the meta-analysis of NGF in patients with MDD and in HCs.Notes: *The report by Pallavi et al22 also contained data of subjects who were in a “drug-free” state. P<0.05.Abbreviations: CI, confidence interval; HCs, healthy controls; MDD, major depressive disorder; NGF, nerve growth factor.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4389916&req=5

f2-ndt-11-925: (A) Forest plot of the meta-analysis of NGF in patients with MDD and in HCs. (B) Funnel plot of the meta-analysis of NGF in patients with MDD and in HCs.Notes: *The report by Pallavi et al22 also contained data of subjects who were in a “drug-free” state. P<0.05.Abbreviations: CI, confidence interval; HCs, healthy controls; MDD, major depressive disorder; NGF, nerve growth factor.
Mentions: At this stage, we investigated the meta-analysis (1) studies, which compared only peripheral NGF levels in patients with MDD and in HCs. A total of 376 patients with MDD and 425 HCs were extracted from seven studies. The peripheral NGF protein levels were significantly lower in patients with MDD than in HCs (ES: −0.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −0.91 to −0.03, P=0.036) (Figure 2A). In addition, a significant heterogeneity within these studies was found (Q=49.1, df=6, I2=87.8%, P<0.001). Significant publication bias could also be detected, using Egger’s test (t=3.15, df=5, two-tailed, P=0.025) and visual examination of the funnel plot (Figure 2B).

Bottom Line: We conducted a thorough literature search and compared peripheral NGF levels between MDD and HC through meta-analysis, and investigated possible confounding variables through meta-regression.The main result was that the NGF levels were significantly lower in MDD than in HCs and that this had an inverse correlation with mean age and disease severity.In addition, meta-analysis of four articles found that the peripheral NGF levels did not change significantly before and after treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, E-Da Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Since its discovery several decades ago, nerve growth factor (NGF) has been found to play roles in different areas, such as neurology, endocrinology, and immunology. There is some evidence linking NGF and psychiatry, including the role of NGF in subjects' response to stress, the alteration of NGF in different emotional states, and the penetration of NGF across the blood-brain barrier under specific conditions. There are many inconsistent findings regarding the differences in NGF in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) at the present time. The aim of our study was to clarify whether NGF levels are different in MDD compared with healthy controls (HCs).

Methods: We conducted a thorough literature search and compared peripheral NGF levels between MDD and HC through meta-analysis, and investigated possible confounding variables through meta-regression.

Results: Seven studies were brought into the current meta-analysis comparing peripheral NGF in MDD and HCs. The main result was that the NGF levels were significantly lower in MDD than in HCs and that this had an inverse correlation with mean age and disease severity. In addition, meta-analysis of four articles found that the peripheral NGF levels did not change significantly before and after treatment.

Conclusion: Our study highlights the significant differences in peripheral NGF levels in patients with MDD. However, further exploration of the dynamic changes in peripheral NGF along with the disease course, and specific studies investigating the correlation of NGF in the peripheral and CNS environments are still needed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus