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Current rectifying and resistive switching in high density BiFeO3 nanocapacitor arrays on Nb-SrTiO3 substrates.

Zhao L, Lu Z, Zhang F, Tian G, Song X, Li Z, Huang K, Zhang Z, Qin M - Sci Rep (2015)

Bottom Line: These capacitors also show reversible polarization domain structures, and well-established piezoresponse hysteresis loops.Moreover, apparent current-rectification and resistive switching behaviors were identified in these nanocapacitor cells using conductive-AFM technique, which are attributed to the polarization modulated p-n junctions.These make it possible to utilize these nanocapacitors in high-density (>100 Gbit/inch(2)) nonvolatile memories and other oxide nanoelectronic devices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Advanced Materials and Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China.

ABSTRACT
Ultrahigh density well-registered oxide nanocapacitors are very essential for large scale integrated microelectronic devices. We report the fabrication of well-ordered multiferroic BiFeO3 nanocapacitor arrays by a combination of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method and anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template method. The capacitor cells consist of BiFeO3/SrRuO3 (BFO/SRO) heterostructural nanodots on conductive Nb-doped SrTiO3 (Nb-STO) substrates with a lateral size of ~60 nm. These capacitors also show reversible polarization domain structures, and well-established piezoresponse hysteresis loops. Moreover, apparent current-rectification and resistive switching behaviors were identified in these nanocapacitor cells using conductive-AFM technique, which are attributed to the polarization modulated p-n junctions. These make it possible to utilize these nanocapacitors in high-density (>100 Gbit/inch(2)) nonvolatile memories and other oxide nanoelectronic devices.

No MeSH data available.


The local conductivity measurement on a single nanocapcitor cell by C-AFM.(a) The schematic diagram for the measurement devices; (b) local I–V curves at a maximum bias voltage of 4 V, showing both a large rectification and a resistive switching behaviors; (c) the replotted I–V curve in a semi-logarithmic style; (d) 15-cycles endurance test, with a readout voltage of at 1 V; (e, f) Ln(I)-V cures for both HRS (e) and LRS (f) at the positive bias range, which are fitted to the p-n conduction exponential relation.
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f5: The local conductivity measurement on a single nanocapcitor cell by C-AFM.(a) The schematic diagram for the measurement devices; (b) local I–V curves at a maximum bias voltage of 4 V, showing both a large rectification and a resistive switching behaviors; (c) the replotted I–V curve in a semi-logarithmic style; (d) 15-cycles endurance test, with a readout voltage of at 1 V; (e, f) Ln(I)-V cures for both HRS (e) and LRS (f) at the positive bias range, which are fitted to the p-n conduction exponential relation.

Mentions: To further examine the resistive property, we look into the local current-voltage (I–V) characteristics by CAFM on a single BFO nanodot. The schematic structure of the device is depicted in Fig. 5(a). One observed a hysteresis I–V curves in Fig. 5(b) & (c), indicating an apparent resistive switching behavior. To examine the stability of the switching behavior, we performed the I–V sweep at a bias voltage of 4 V for 15 cycles. The ON/OFF current at a reading voltage of 1 V is plotted in Fig. 5(d), which shows more or less stable state with a big RON/OFF ratio of ~593 up to 15 cycles. Interestingly, a large current rectification behavior can be identified as shown in Fig. 5(b), which can also greatly affect the resistive behaviors. It is well-known that Nb-STO is an n-type semiconductor, and BFO with Bi vacancies could be considered as p-type semiconductor21. Thus, a p-n junction can be formed at the BFO/Nb-STO interface, which is most probably the reason for the large current rectification behavior.


Current rectifying and resistive switching in high density BiFeO3 nanocapacitor arrays on Nb-SrTiO3 substrates.

Zhao L, Lu Z, Zhang F, Tian G, Song X, Li Z, Huang K, Zhang Z, Qin M - Sci Rep (2015)

The local conductivity measurement on a single nanocapcitor cell by C-AFM.(a) The schematic diagram for the measurement devices; (b) local I–V curves at a maximum bias voltage of 4 V, showing both a large rectification and a resistive switching behaviors; (c) the replotted I–V curve in a semi-logarithmic style; (d) 15-cycles endurance test, with a readout voltage of at 1 V; (e, f) Ln(I)-V cures for both HRS (e) and LRS (f) at the positive bias range, which are fitted to the p-n conduction exponential relation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4389717&req=5

f5: The local conductivity measurement on a single nanocapcitor cell by C-AFM.(a) The schematic diagram for the measurement devices; (b) local I–V curves at a maximum bias voltage of 4 V, showing both a large rectification and a resistive switching behaviors; (c) the replotted I–V curve in a semi-logarithmic style; (d) 15-cycles endurance test, with a readout voltage of at 1 V; (e, f) Ln(I)-V cures for both HRS (e) and LRS (f) at the positive bias range, which are fitted to the p-n conduction exponential relation.
Mentions: To further examine the resistive property, we look into the local current-voltage (I–V) characteristics by CAFM on a single BFO nanodot. The schematic structure of the device is depicted in Fig. 5(a). One observed a hysteresis I–V curves in Fig. 5(b) & (c), indicating an apparent resistive switching behavior. To examine the stability of the switching behavior, we performed the I–V sweep at a bias voltage of 4 V for 15 cycles. The ON/OFF current at a reading voltage of 1 V is plotted in Fig. 5(d), which shows more or less stable state with a big RON/OFF ratio of ~593 up to 15 cycles. Interestingly, a large current rectification behavior can be identified as shown in Fig. 5(b), which can also greatly affect the resistive behaviors. It is well-known that Nb-STO is an n-type semiconductor, and BFO with Bi vacancies could be considered as p-type semiconductor21. Thus, a p-n junction can be formed at the BFO/Nb-STO interface, which is most probably the reason for the large current rectification behavior.

Bottom Line: These capacitors also show reversible polarization domain structures, and well-established piezoresponse hysteresis loops.Moreover, apparent current-rectification and resistive switching behaviors were identified in these nanocapacitor cells using conductive-AFM technique, which are attributed to the polarization modulated p-n junctions.These make it possible to utilize these nanocapacitors in high-density (>100 Gbit/inch(2)) nonvolatile memories and other oxide nanoelectronic devices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute for Advanced Materials and Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006, China.

ABSTRACT
Ultrahigh density well-registered oxide nanocapacitors are very essential for large scale integrated microelectronic devices. We report the fabrication of well-ordered multiferroic BiFeO3 nanocapacitor arrays by a combination of pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method and anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) template method. The capacitor cells consist of BiFeO3/SrRuO3 (BFO/SRO) heterostructural nanodots on conductive Nb-doped SrTiO3 (Nb-STO) substrates with a lateral size of ~60 nm. These capacitors also show reversible polarization domain structures, and well-established piezoresponse hysteresis loops. Moreover, apparent current-rectification and resistive switching behaviors were identified in these nanocapacitor cells using conductive-AFM technique, which are attributed to the polarization modulated p-n junctions. These make it possible to utilize these nanocapacitors in high-density (>100 Gbit/inch(2)) nonvolatile memories and other oxide nanoelectronic devices.

No MeSH data available.