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Screening tests: a review with examples.

Maxim LD, Niebo R, Utell MJ - Inhal Toxicol (2014)

Bottom Line: This article presents an overview of such tests including the definitions of key technical (sensitivity and specificity) and population characteristics necessary to assess the benefits and limitations of such tests.The importance of careful consideration of the consequences of both false positives and negatives is highlighted.Receiver operating characteristic curves are explained as is the need to carefully select the population group to be tested.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Everest Consulting Associates , Cranbury, NJ , USA and.

ABSTRACT
Screening tests are widely used in medicine to assess the likelihood that members of a defined population have a particular disease. This article presents an overview of such tests including the definitions of key technical (sensitivity and specificity) and population characteristics necessary to assess the benefits and limitations of such tests. Several examples are used to illustrate calculations, including the characteristics of low dose computed tomography as a lung cancer screen, choice of an optimal PSA cutoff and selection of the population to undergo mammography. The importance of careful consideration of the consequences of both false positives and negatives is highlighted. Receiver operating characteristic curves are explained as is the need to carefully select the population group to be tested.

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Receiver operating characteristic curve of prostate specific antigen (PSA) test, based on data from Thompson et al. (2005) among men aged 70 or more. Numbers shown are the specific cutoff on the PSA test result. The area under the curve (AUC) in this case is 0.678.
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Figure 6: Receiver operating characteristic curve of prostate specific antigen (PSA) test, based on data from Thompson et al. (2005) among men aged 70 or more. Numbers shown are the specific cutoff on the PSA test result. The area under the curve (AUC) in this case is 0.678.

Mentions: Figure 6 shows a typical receiver operating characteristic (ROC)16 curve for a prostate specific antigen (PSA) test administered to men aged 70 or more.


Screening tests: a review with examples.

Maxim LD, Niebo R, Utell MJ - Inhal Toxicol (2014)

Receiver operating characteristic curve of prostate specific antigen (PSA) test, based on data from Thompson et al. (2005) among men aged 70 or more. Numbers shown are the specific cutoff on the PSA test result. The area under the curve (AUC) in this case is 0.678.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4389712&req=5

Figure 6: Receiver operating characteristic curve of prostate specific antigen (PSA) test, based on data from Thompson et al. (2005) among men aged 70 or more. Numbers shown are the specific cutoff on the PSA test result. The area under the curve (AUC) in this case is 0.678.
Mentions: Figure 6 shows a typical receiver operating characteristic (ROC)16 curve for a prostate specific antigen (PSA) test administered to men aged 70 or more.

Bottom Line: This article presents an overview of such tests including the definitions of key technical (sensitivity and specificity) and population characteristics necessary to assess the benefits and limitations of such tests.The importance of careful consideration of the consequences of both false positives and negatives is highlighted.Receiver operating characteristic curves are explained as is the need to carefully select the population group to be tested.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Everest Consulting Associates , Cranbury, NJ , USA and.

ABSTRACT
Screening tests are widely used in medicine to assess the likelihood that members of a defined population have a particular disease. This article presents an overview of such tests including the definitions of key technical (sensitivity and specificity) and population characteristics necessary to assess the benefits and limitations of such tests. Several examples are used to illustrate calculations, including the characteristics of low dose computed tomography as a lung cancer screen, choice of an optimal PSA cutoff and selection of the population to undergo mammography. The importance of careful consideration of the consequences of both false positives and negatives is highlighted. Receiver operating characteristic curves are explained as is the need to carefully select the population group to be tested.

Show MeSH