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Racial and ethnic differences among amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases in the United States.

Rechtman L, Jordan H, Wagner L, Horton DK, Kaye W - Amyotroph Lateral Scler Frontotemporal Degener (2014)

Bottom Line: The overall age-adjusted average annual incidence rate was 1.44 per 100,000 person-years and the age-adjusted average incidence rates also differed by race and ethnicity.Racial differences were also found in payer type, time from symptom onset to diagnosis, reported El Escorial criteria, and age at diagnosis.In conclusion, calculated incidence rates demonstrate that ALS occurs less frequently in African-American/blacks and Asians compared to whites, and less frequently in Hispanics compared to non-Hispanics in the U.S. A more precise understanding of racial and ethnic variations in ALS may help to reveal candidates for further studies of disease etiology and disease progression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: McKing Consulting Corporation , Atlanta , Georgia.

ABSTRACT
Our objective was to describe racial and ethnic differences of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in distinct geographic locations around the United States (U.S.). ALS cases for the period 2009-2011 were identified using active case surveillance in three states and eight metropolitan areas. Of the 5883 unique ALS cases identified, 74.8% were white, 9.3% were African-American/black, 3.6% were Asian, 12.0% were an unknown race, and 0.3% were marked as some other race. For ethnicity, 77.5% were defined as non-Hispanic, 10.8% Hispanic, and 11.7% were of unknown ethnicity. The overall crude average annual incidence rate was 1.52 per 100,000 person-years and the rate differed by race and ethnicity. The overall age-adjusted average annual incidence rate was 1.44 per 100,000 person-years and the age-adjusted average incidence rates also differed by race and ethnicity. Racial differences were also found in payer type, time from symptom onset to diagnosis, reported El Escorial criteria, and age at diagnosis. In conclusion, calculated incidence rates demonstrate that ALS occurs less frequently in African-American/blacks and Asians compared to whites, and less frequently in Hispanics compared to non-Hispanics in the U.S. A more precise understanding of racial and ethnic variations in ALS may help to reveal candidates for further studies of disease etiology and disease progression.

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Stratified age-adjusted average annual incidence rates for reported ALS cases by race and ethnicity for the period 1 January 2009 through 31 December 2011 in all 11 project areas.
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Figure 1: Stratified age-adjusted average annual incidence rates for reported ALS cases by race and ethnicity for the period 1 January 2009 through 31 December 2011 in all 11 project areas.

Mentions: A total of 3819 cases were newly diagnosed during the period 1 January 2009 through 31 December 2011. The overall crude annual incidence rates for 2009, 2010 and 2011 were 1.42 per 100,000 person-years, 1.53 per 100,000 person-years and 1.62 per 100,000 person-years, respectively, and the overall crude average annual incidence rate was 1.52 per 100,000 person-years. The average crude annual incidence rate for whites was 1.79 per 100,000 person-years compared with 0.80 per 100,000 person-years for African-American/blacks and 0.76 per 100,000 person-years for Asians (Figure 1). The average crude annual incidence rate for non-Hispanics was 1.65 per 100,000 person-years compared with 0.57 per 100,000 person-years for Hispanics (Figure 1).


Racial and ethnic differences among amyotrophic lateral sclerosis cases in the United States.

Rechtman L, Jordan H, Wagner L, Horton DK, Kaye W - Amyotroph Lateral Scler Frontotemporal Degener (2014)

Stratified age-adjusted average annual incidence rates for reported ALS cases by race and ethnicity for the period 1 January 2009 through 31 December 2011 in all 11 project areas.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4389704&req=5

Figure 1: Stratified age-adjusted average annual incidence rates for reported ALS cases by race and ethnicity for the period 1 January 2009 through 31 December 2011 in all 11 project areas.
Mentions: A total of 3819 cases were newly diagnosed during the period 1 January 2009 through 31 December 2011. The overall crude annual incidence rates for 2009, 2010 and 2011 were 1.42 per 100,000 person-years, 1.53 per 100,000 person-years and 1.62 per 100,000 person-years, respectively, and the overall crude average annual incidence rate was 1.52 per 100,000 person-years. The average crude annual incidence rate for whites was 1.79 per 100,000 person-years compared with 0.80 per 100,000 person-years for African-American/blacks and 0.76 per 100,000 person-years for Asians (Figure 1). The average crude annual incidence rate for non-Hispanics was 1.65 per 100,000 person-years compared with 0.57 per 100,000 person-years for Hispanics (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: The overall age-adjusted average annual incidence rate was 1.44 per 100,000 person-years and the age-adjusted average incidence rates also differed by race and ethnicity.Racial differences were also found in payer type, time from symptom onset to diagnosis, reported El Escorial criteria, and age at diagnosis.In conclusion, calculated incidence rates demonstrate that ALS occurs less frequently in African-American/blacks and Asians compared to whites, and less frequently in Hispanics compared to non-Hispanics in the U.S. A more precise understanding of racial and ethnic variations in ALS may help to reveal candidates for further studies of disease etiology and disease progression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: McKing Consulting Corporation , Atlanta , Georgia.

ABSTRACT
Our objective was to describe racial and ethnic differences of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in distinct geographic locations around the United States (U.S.). ALS cases for the period 2009-2011 were identified using active case surveillance in three states and eight metropolitan areas. Of the 5883 unique ALS cases identified, 74.8% were white, 9.3% were African-American/black, 3.6% were Asian, 12.0% were an unknown race, and 0.3% were marked as some other race. For ethnicity, 77.5% were defined as non-Hispanic, 10.8% Hispanic, and 11.7% were of unknown ethnicity. The overall crude average annual incidence rate was 1.52 per 100,000 person-years and the rate differed by race and ethnicity. The overall age-adjusted average annual incidence rate was 1.44 per 100,000 person-years and the age-adjusted average incidence rates also differed by race and ethnicity. Racial differences were also found in payer type, time from symptom onset to diagnosis, reported El Escorial criteria, and age at diagnosis. In conclusion, calculated incidence rates demonstrate that ALS occurs less frequently in African-American/blacks and Asians compared to whites, and less frequently in Hispanics compared to non-Hispanics in the U.S. A more precise understanding of racial and ethnic variations in ALS may help to reveal candidates for further studies of disease etiology and disease progression.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus