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Efficacy of phytoestrogens for menopausal symptoms: a meta-analysis and systematic review.

Chen MN, Lin CC, Liu CF - Climacteric (2014)

Bottom Line: Meta-analysis of the seven studies that reported KI data indicated no significant treatment effect of phytoestrogen as compared to placebo (pooled mean difference = 6.44, p = 0.110).Meta-analysis of the ten studies that reported hot flush data indicated that phytoestrogens result in a significantly greater reduction in hot flush frequency compared to placebo (pooled mean difference = 0.89, p < 0.005).Phytoestrogens appear to reduce the frequency of hot flushes in menopausal women, without serious side-effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hsin Sheng Junior College of Medical Care and Management , Taoyuan.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To perform a meta-analysis examining the efficacy of phytoestrogens for the relief of menopausal symptoms.

Methods: Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until September 30, 2013 using the following key words: vasomotor symptoms, menopausal symptoms, phytoestrogens, isoflavones, coumestrol, soy, red clover. Inclusion criteria were (1) randomized controlled trial (RCT), (2) perimenopausal or postmenopausal women experiencing menopausal symptoms, (3) intervention with an oral phytoestrogen. Outcome measures included Kupperman index (KI) changes, daily hot flush frequency, and the likelihood of side-effects.

Results: Of 543 potentially relevant studies identified, 15 RCTs meeting the inclusion criteria were included. The mean age of the subjects ranged from 49 to 58.3 and 48 to 60.1 years, respectively, in the placebo and phytoestrogen groups. The number of participants ranged from 30 to 252, and the intervention periods ranged from 3 to 12 months. Meta-analysis of the seven studies that reported KI data indicated no significant treatment effect of phytoestrogen as compared to placebo (pooled mean difference = 6.44, p = 0.110). Meta-analysis of the ten studies that reported hot flush data indicated that phytoestrogens result in a significantly greater reduction in hot flush frequency compared to placebo (pooled mean difference = 0.89, p < 0.005). Meta-analysis of the five studies that reported side-effect data showed no significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.175).

Conclusion: Phytoestrogens appear to reduce the frequency of hot flushes in menopausal women, without serious side-effects.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Meta-analysis (a) with sensitivity evaluation (b) for the likelihood of side-effects between the placebo and phytoestrogen groups (five studies included). The random-effects approach was used due to significant heterogeneity (Q = 10.15, I2 = 60.60, p = 0.038). OR, odds ratio; CI, confidence interval
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Figure 4: Meta-analysis (a) with sensitivity evaluation (b) for the likelihood of side-effects between the placebo and phytoestrogen groups (five studies included). The random-effects approach was used due to significant heterogeneity (Q = 10.15, I2 = 60.60, p = 0.038). OR, odds ratio; CI, confidence interval

Mentions: Four19,21,23,26 of the five studies that reported the number of side-effects showed no significant difference in the numbers of side-effects between groups. The study by Van Patten and colleagues28 reported that the subjects in phytoestrogen group were less likely to experience side-effects than those in the placebo group (OR = 0.31, p = 0.003). Meta-analysis of the five studies showed no significant difference in side-effects between the two groups (p = 0.175, Figure 4a). With the exception of the study by Tice and colleagues26, when each of the other studies was removed in turn, the pooled ORs remained < 1 and non-significant. When the study by Tice and colleagues26 was removed, the pooled OR reached statistical significance (p = 0.034) (Figure 4b).


Efficacy of phytoestrogens for menopausal symptoms: a meta-analysis and systematic review.

Chen MN, Lin CC, Liu CF - Climacteric (2014)

Meta-analysis (a) with sensitivity evaluation (b) for the likelihood of side-effects between the placebo and phytoestrogen groups (five studies included). The random-effects approach was used due to significant heterogeneity (Q = 10.15, I2 = 60.60, p = 0.038). OR, odds ratio; CI, confidence interval
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4389700&req=5

Figure 4: Meta-analysis (a) with sensitivity evaluation (b) for the likelihood of side-effects between the placebo and phytoestrogen groups (five studies included). The random-effects approach was used due to significant heterogeneity (Q = 10.15, I2 = 60.60, p = 0.038). OR, odds ratio; CI, confidence interval
Mentions: Four19,21,23,26 of the five studies that reported the number of side-effects showed no significant difference in the numbers of side-effects between groups. The study by Van Patten and colleagues28 reported that the subjects in phytoestrogen group were less likely to experience side-effects than those in the placebo group (OR = 0.31, p = 0.003). Meta-analysis of the five studies showed no significant difference in side-effects between the two groups (p = 0.175, Figure 4a). With the exception of the study by Tice and colleagues26, when each of the other studies was removed in turn, the pooled ORs remained < 1 and non-significant. When the study by Tice and colleagues26 was removed, the pooled OR reached statistical significance (p = 0.034) (Figure 4b).

Bottom Line: Meta-analysis of the seven studies that reported KI data indicated no significant treatment effect of phytoestrogen as compared to placebo (pooled mean difference = 6.44, p = 0.110).Meta-analysis of the ten studies that reported hot flush data indicated that phytoestrogens result in a significantly greater reduction in hot flush frequency compared to placebo (pooled mean difference = 0.89, p < 0.005).Phytoestrogens appear to reduce the frequency of hot flushes in menopausal women, without serious side-effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Hsin Sheng Junior College of Medical Care and Management , Taoyuan.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To perform a meta-analysis examining the efficacy of phytoestrogens for the relief of menopausal symptoms.

Methods: Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and Google Scholar databases were searched until September 30, 2013 using the following key words: vasomotor symptoms, menopausal symptoms, phytoestrogens, isoflavones, coumestrol, soy, red clover. Inclusion criteria were (1) randomized controlled trial (RCT), (2) perimenopausal or postmenopausal women experiencing menopausal symptoms, (3) intervention with an oral phytoestrogen. Outcome measures included Kupperman index (KI) changes, daily hot flush frequency, and the likelihood of side-effects.

Results: Of 543 potentially relevant studies identified, 15 RCTs meeting the inclusion criteria were included. The mean age of the subjects ranged from 49 to 58.3 and 48 to 60.1 years, respectively, in the placebo and phytoestrogen groups. The number of participants ranged from 30 to 252, and the intervention periods ranged from 3 to 12 months. Meta-analysis of the seven studies that reported KI data indicated no significant treatment effect of phytoestrogen as compared to placebo (pooled mean difference = 6.44, p = 0.110). Meta-analysis of the ten studies that reported hot flush data indicated that phytoestrogens result in a significantly greater reduction in hot flush frequency compared to placebo (pooled mean difference = 0.89, p < 0.005). Meta-analysis of the five studies that reported side-effect data showed no significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.175).

Conclusion: Phytoestrogens appear to reduce the frequency of hot flushes in menopausal women, without serious side-effects.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus