Limits...
Prosomeric organization of the hypothalamus in an elasmobranch, the catshark Scyliorhinus canicula.

Santos-Durán GN, Menuet A, Lagadec R, Mayeur H, Ferreiro-Galve S, Mazan S, Rodríguez-Moldes I, Candal E - Front Neuroanat (2015)

Bottom Line: Deciphering its embryonic and adult organization is crucial in an evolutionary approach of the organization of the vertebrate forebrain.Analysis of the results within the updated prosomeric model framework support the existence of alar and basal histogenetic compartments in the hypothalamus similar to those described in the mouse, suggesting the ancestrality of these subdivisions in jawed vertebrates.These data provide new insights into hypothalamic organization in cartilaginous fishes and highlight the generality of key features of the prosomeric model in jawed vertebrates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, Department of Cell Biology and Ecology, University of Santiago de Compostela Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

ABSTRACT
The hypothalamus has been a central topic in neuroanatomy because of its important physiological functions, but its mature organization remains elusive. Deciphering its embryonic and adult organization is crucial in an evolutionary approach of the organization of the vertebrate forebrain. Here we studied the molecular organization of the hypothalamus and neighboring telencephalic domains in a cartilaginous fish, the catshark, Scyliorhinus canicula, focusing on ScFoxg1a, ScShh, ScNkx2.1, ScDlx2/5, ScOtp, and ScTbr1 expression profiles and on the identification α-acetylated-tubulin-immunoreactive (ir), TH-ir, 5-HT-ir, and GFAP-ir structures by means of immunohistochemistry. Analysis of the results within the updated prosomeric model framework support the existence of alar and basal histogenetic compartments in the hypothalamus similar to those described in the mouse, suggesting the ancestrality of these subdivisions in jawed vertebrates. These data provide new insights into hypothalamic organization in cartilaginous fishes and highlight the generality of key features of the prosomeric model in jawed vertebrates.

No MeSH data available.


Squematic representations of the prosencephalon of early (A) and late (B,C) mouse embryo to show correspondence of longitudinal and tranverse domains in the secondary prosencephalon under the updated prosomeric model. Domains in (A) are illustrated according to Figure 1.1C in Martínez et al. (2012). Domains in (B,C) are illustrated according to Figure 8.5B in Puelles et al. (2012). (A) Longitudinal domains in early embryos. The arrowheads mark both the dorso-caudal and ventro-caudal limits of the acroterminal territory (At). This territory is considered the rostral-most domain of the neural tube. The dorso-caudal limit of the At can be identified caudal to the anterior commissure. (B) Longitudinal and transverse organization in late embryos. (C) Segmental organization of the secondary prosencephalon according to the prosomeric model. For abbreviations, see list.
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Figure 2: Squematic representations of the prosencephalon of early (A) and late (B,C) mouse embryo to show correspondence of longitudinal and tranverse domains in the secondary prosencephalon under the updated prosomeric model. Domains in (A) are illustrated according to Figure 1.1C in Martínez et al. (2012). Domains in (B,C) are illustrated according to Figure 8.5B in Puelles et al. (2012). (A) Longitudinal domains in early embryos. The arrowheads mark both the dorso-caudal and ventro-caudal limits of the acroterminal territory (At). This territory is considered the rostral-most domain of the neural tube. The dorso-caudal limit of the At can be identified caudal to the anterior commissure. (B) Longitudinal and transverse organization in late embryos. (C) Segmental organization of the secondary prosencephalon according to the prosomeric model. For abbreviations, see list.

Mentions: The organization of the shark hypothalamus has been analyzed in the framework of the updated prosomeric model (Puelles et al., 2012). Figure 2 summarizes the general architecture of the hypothalamus in mouse according to the updated prosomeric model (Puelles et al., 2012). This model is mainly inspired in murine data though it is usually assumed that it can be extrapolated to all vertebrates because it also integrates information from other vertebrates (Puelles and Rubenstein, 2003; Pombal et al., 2009; Puelles, 2009). Indeed, this model represents a useful developmental and comparative framework since it makes use of concepts, nomenclature and topological references that can be used across different vertebrate species.


Prosomeric organization of the hypothalamus in an elasmobranch, the catshark Scyliorhinus canicula.

Santos-Durán GN, Menuet A, Lagadec R, Mayeur H, Ferreiro-Galve S, Mazan S, Rodríguez-Moldes I, Candal E - Front Neuroanat (2015)

Squematic representations of the prosencephalon of early (A) and late (B,C) mouse embryo to show correspondence of longitudinal and tranverse domains in the secondary prosencephalon under the updated prosomeric model. Domains in (A) are illustrated according to Figure 1.1C in Martínez et al. (2012). Domains in (B,C) are illustrated according to Figure 8.5B in Puelles et al. (2012). (A) Longitudinal domains in early embryos. The arrowheads mark both the dorso-caudal and ventro-caudal limits of the acroterminal territory (At). This territory is considered the rostral-most domain of the neural tube. The dorso-caudal limit of the At can be identified caudal to the anterior commissure. (B) Longitudinal and transverse organization in late embryos. (C) Segmental organization of the secondary prosencephalon according to the prosomeric model. For abbreviations, see list.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4389657&req=5

Figure 2: Squematic representations of the prosencephalon of early (A) and late (B,C) mouse embryo to show correspondence of longitudinal and tranverse domains in the secondary prosencephalon under the updated prosomeric model. Domains in (A) are illustrated according to Figure 1.1C in Martínez et al. (2012). Domains in (B,C) are illustrated according to Figure 8.5B in Puelles et al. (2012). (A) Longitudinal domains in early embryos. The arrowheads mark both the dorso-caudal and ventro-caudal limits of the acroterminal territory (At). This territory is considered the rostral-most domain of the neural tube. The dorso-caudal limit of the At can be identified caudal to the anterior commissure. (B) Longitudinal and transverse organization in late embryos. (C) Segmental organization of the secondary prosencephalon according to the prosomeric model. For abbreviations, see list.
Mentions: The organization of the shark hypothalamus has been analyzed in the framework of the updated prosomeric model (Puelles et al., 2012). Figure 2 summarizes the general architecture of the hypothalamus in mouse according to the updated prosomeric model (Puelles et al., 2012). This model is mainly inspired in murine data though it is usually assumed that it can be extrapolated to all vertebrates because it also integrates information from other vertebrates (Puelles and Rubenstein, 2003; Pombal et al., 2009; Puelles, 2009). Indeed, this model represents a useful developmental and comparative framework since it makes use of concepts, nomenclature and topological references that can be used across different vertebrate species.

Bottom Line: Deciphering its embryonic and adult organization is crucial in an evolutionary approach of the organization of the vertebrate forebrain.Analysis of the results within the updated prosomeric model framework support the existence of alar and basal histogenetic compartments in the hypothalamus similar to those described in the mouse, suggesting the ancestrality of these subdivisions in jawed vertebrates.These data provide new insights into hypothalamic organization in cartilaginous fishes and highlight the generality of key features of the prosomeric model in jawed vertebrates.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, Department of Cell Biology and Ecology, University of Santiago de Compostela Santiago de Compostela, Spain.

ABSTRACT
The hypothalamus has been a central topic in neuroanatomy because of its important physiological functions, but its mature organization remains elusive. Deciphering its embryonic and adult organization is crucial in an evolutionary approach of the organization of the vertebrate forebrain. Here we studied the molecular organization of the hypothalamus and neighboring telencephalic domains in a cartilaginous fish, the catshark, Scyliorhinus canicula, focusing on ScFoxg1a, ScShh, ScNkx2.1, ScDlx2/5, ScOtp, and ScTbr1 expression profiles and on the identification α-acetylated-tubulin-immunoreactive (ir), TH-ir, 5-HT-ir, and GFAP-ir structures by means of immunohistochemistry. Analysis of the results within the updated prosomeric model framework support the existence of alar and basal histogenetic compartments in the hypothalamus similar to those described in the mouse, suggesting the ancestrality of these subdivisions in jawed vertebrates. These data provide new insights into hypothalamic organization in cartilaginous fishes and highlight the generality of key features of the prosomeric model in jawed vertebrates.

No MeSH data available.