Limits...
Comparing the two Greek archipelagos plant species diversity and endemism patterns highlight the importance of isolation and precipitation as biodiversity drivers.

Iliadou E, Kallimanis AS, Dimopoulos P, Panitsa M - J Biol Res (Thessalon) (2014)

Bottom Line: For instance, when considering similarly sized islands, those in the Ionian host as many as, if not more, species compared to the Aegean.In contrast, the Ionian Islands are poor in endemics (particularly narrow range endemics, such as single island or regional endemics) and threatened taxa, compared to the Aegean Islands.In the Ionian, endemics only persist on the largest islands, and form a very small proportion of the species pool, compared to the Aegean archipelago.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Ioannina, Agrinio, GR-30100 Greece ; Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, Agrinio, GR-30100 Greece.

ABSTRACT

Background: Greece has two island archipelagos, the Aegean and the Ionian, which host a rich array of plants and wildlife, particularly endemic and threatened plant species. Despite the long history of island biogeographic studies in the Aegean, similar studies in the Ionian remain limited, with the two island archipelagos rarely being compared.

Results: The Aegean and Ionian archipelagos share many features, especially regarding total plant diversity, but exhibit different patterns of endemism. For instance, when considering similarly sized islands, those in the Ionian host as many as, if not more, species compared to the Aegean. In contrast, the Ionian Islands are poor in endemics (particularly narrow range endemics, such as single island or regional endemics) and threatened taxa, compared to the Aegean Islands. In the Ionian, endemics only persist on the largest islands, and form a very small proportion of the species pool, compared to the Aegean archipelago.

Conclusions: The lack of endemism might be attributed to the more recent separation of the Ionian Islands from the mainland and the shorter distance separating them from the mainland. In addition, the Ionian Islands receive higher levels of precipitation and are typically covered by denser and higher vegetation than the Aegean Islands. These conditions favour greater total species richness, but tend to lead to higher numbers of common species compared to threatened and endemic taxa. This study demonstrates that both isolation and precipitation serve as biodiversity drivers, influencing plant species diversity and endemism patterns, of the two Greek archipelagos.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Species-Area relationship for single island endemic species richness in the Aegean (grey squares) and Ionian (black diamonds) islands.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4389644&req=5

Fig2: Species-Area relationship for single island endemic species richness in the Aegean (grey squares) and Ionian (black diamonds) islands.

Mentions: The power model of the species-area relationship explained 76.5% and 88.8% of the variability in species richness for the Aegean and Ionian, respectively (Table 4). Greek endemic species richness and threatened species richness were strongly correlated with area in the Ionian archipelago (R2 = 0.888 and R2 = 0.919, respectively) and were significantly correlated with area for the Aegean archipelago (R2 = 0.558 and R2 = 0.591, respectively) (Table 4). Single island endemic species richness and threatened endemic species richness were only significantly correlated with area for the Aegean (not the Ionian). The lack of significance for the Ionian might be an artefact of the small number of islands with endemics in this region, and, thus, the low degrees of freedom (d.f. = 3). Given the significance of area as a driver of diversity, we compared island diversity patterns among the two archipelagos, taking island area into account. Although for total species richness, the Ionian Islands hosted a large number of species comparable to islands of similar size in the Aegean (Figure 1) for endemics species richness they hosted far fewer endemics compared to islands of similar size in the Aegean (Figure 2), with the same trend being obtained for threatened species richness (Figure 3).Table 4


Comparing the two Greek archipelagos plant species diversity and endemism patterns highlight the importance of isolation and precipitation as biodiversity drivers.

Iliadou E, Kallimanis AS, Dimopoulos P, Panitsa M - J Biol Res (Thessalon) (2014)

Species-Area relationship for single island endemic species richness in the Aegean (grey squares) and Ionian (black diamonds) islands.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4389644&req=5

Fig2: Species-Area relationship for single island endemic species richness in the Aegean (grey squares) and Ionian (black diamonds) islands.
Mentions: The power model of the species-area relationship explained 76.5% and 88.8% of the variability in species richness for the Aegean and Ionian, respectively (Table 4). Greek endemic species richness and threatened species richness were strongly correlated with area in the Ionian archipelago (R2 = 0.888 and R2 = 0.919, respectively) and were significantly correlated with area for the Aegean archipelago (R2 = 0.558 and R2 = 0.591, respectively) (Table 4). Single island endemic species richness and threatened endemic species richness were only significantly correlated with area for the Aegean (not the Ionian). The lack of significance for the Ionian might be an artefact of the small number of islands with endemics in this region, and, thus, the low degrees of freedom (d.f. = 3). Given the significance of area as a driver of diversity, we compared island diversity patterns among the two archipelagos, taking island area into account. Although for total species richness, the Ionian Islands hosted a large number of species comparable to islands of similar size in the Aegean (Figure 1) for endemics species richness they hosted far fewer endemics compared to islands of similar size in the Aegean (Figure 2), with the same trend being obtained for threatened species richness (Figure 3).Table 4

Bottom Line: For instance, when considering similarly sized islands, those in the Ionian host as many as, if not more, species compared to the Aegean.In contrast, the Ionian Islands are poor in endemics (particularly narrow range endemics, such as single island or regional endemics) and threatened taxa, compared to the Aegean Islands.In the Ionian, endemics only persist on the largest islands, and form a very small proportion of the species pool, compared to the Aegean archipelago.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Ioannina, Agrinio, GR-30100 Greece ; Department of Environmental and Natural Resources Management, University of Patras, Agrinio, GR-30100 Greece.

ABSTRACT

Background: Greece has two island archipelagos, the Aegean and the Ionian, which host a rich array of plants and wildlife, particularly endemic and threatened plant species. Despite the long history of island biogeographic studies in the Aegean, similar studies in the Ionian remain limited, with the two island archipelagos rarely being compared.

Results: The Aegean and Ionian archipelagos share many features, especially regarding total plant diversity, but exhibit different patterns of endemism. For instance, when considering similarly sized islands, those in the Ionian host as many as, if not more, species compared to the Aegean. In contrast, the Ionian Islands are poor in endemics (particularly narrow range endemics, such as single island or regional endemics) and threatened taxa, compared to the Aegean Islands. In the Ionian, endemics only persist on the largest islands, and form a very small proportion of the species pool, compared to the Aegean archipelago.

Conclusions: The lack of endemism might be attributed to the more recent separation of the Ionian Islands from the mainland and the shorter distance separating them from the mainland. In addition, the Ionian Islands receive higher levels of precipitation and are typically covered by denser and higher vegetation than the Aegean Islands. These conditions favour greater total species richness, but tend to lead to higher numbers of common species compared to threatened and endemic taxa. This study demonstrates that both isolation and precipitation serve as biodiversity drivers, influencing plant species diversity and endemism patterns, of the two Greek archipelagos.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus