Limits...
Microbial resource utilization traits and trade-offs: implications for community structure, functioning, and biogeochemical impacts at present and in the future.

Litchman E, Edwards KF, Klausmeier CA - Front Microbiol (2015)

Bottom Line: Several important trade-offs have been identified for prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial taxa that define contrasting ecological strategies and contribute to species coexistence and diversity.The shape, dimensionality, and hierarchy of trade-offs may determine coexistence patterns and need to be better characterized.Global environmental change can alter microbial community composition through altering resource utilization by different microbes and, consequently, may modify biogeochemical impacts of microbes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: W.K. Kellogg Biological Station - Michigan State University Hickory Corners, MI, USA ; Department of Integrative Biology, Michigan State University East Lansing, MI, USA.

ABSTRACT
Trait-based approaches provide a mechanistic framework to understand and predict the structure and functioning of microbial communities. Resource utilization traits and trade-offs are among key microbial traits that describe population dynamics and competition among microbes. Several important trade-offs have been identified for prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial taxa that define contrasting ecological strategies and contribute to species coexistence and diversity. The shape, dimensionality, and hierarchy of trade-offs may determine coexistence patterns and need to be better characterized. Laboratory measured resource utilization traits can be used to explain temporal and spatial structure and dynamics of natural microbial communities and predict biogeochemical impacts. Global environmental change can alter microbial community composition through altering resource utilization by different microbes and, consequently, may modify biogeochemical impacts of microbes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The dependence of resource competitive ability on temperature. The species with the lowest R∗ is the best competitor. With increasing temperature, there is a shift in competitive abilities: species A is a better competitor at T1 and species B is a better competitor at T2.
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Figure 3: The dependence of resource competitive ability on temperature. The species with the lowest R∗ is the best competitor. With increasing temperature, there is a shift in competitive abilities: species A is a better competitor at T1 and species B is a better competitor at T2.

Mentions: It is likely, however, that an increase in the uptake or growth affinity with increasing temperature would occur only up to the optimum temperature for a given uptake enzyme(s) activity or for growth, and would decline after that. Indeed, the residual nutrient concentrations were shown to increase past the optimum temperature for growth in bacterial cultures (Reay et al., 1999), suggesting less efficient resource utilization. Therefore, determining the temperature dependence of growth in different bacterial species would allow us to predict whether increasing temperatures would lead to a decreased or increased resource utilization by those species. Temperature, thus, mediates resource competition: species and groups that have their temperature optima most closely matching future temperatures will perform their best in resource competition and resource utilization (Figure 3). Note, however, that those species may still be inferior competitors compared to the overall best competitors. Evolutionary adaptation to temperature, well documented in microbes (Bennett and Lenski, 1993; Mongold et al., 1996), can further alter competitive hierarchies, especially if microbial species have different adaptive potential.


Microbial resource utilization traits and trade-offs: implications for community structure, functioning, and biogeochemical impacts at present and in the future.

Litchman E, Edwards KF, Klausmeier CA - Front Microbiol (2015)

The dependence of resource competitive ability on temperature. The species with the lowest R∗ is the best competitor. With increasing temperature, there is a shift in competitive abilities: species A is a better competitor at T1 and species B is a better competitor at T2.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4389539&req=5

Figure 3: The dependence of resource competitive ability on temperature. The species with the lowest R∗ is the best competitor. With increasing temperature, there is a shift in competitive abilities: species A is a better competitor at T1 and species B is a better competitor at T2.
Mentions: It is likely, however, that an increase in the uptake or growth affinity with increasing temperature would occur only up to the optimum temperature for a given uptake enzyme(s) activity or for growth, and would decline after that. Indeed, the residual nutrient concentrations were shown to increase past the optimum temperature for growth in bacterial cultures (Reay et al., 1999), suggesting less efficient resource utilization. Therefore, determining the temperature dependence of growth in different bacterial species would allow us to predict whether increasing temperatures would lead to a decreased or increased resource utilization by those species. Temperature, thus, mediates resource competition: species and groups that have their temperature optima most closely matching future temperatures will perform their best in resource competition and resource utilization (Figure 3). Note, however, that those species may still be inferior competitors compared to the overall best competitors. Evolutionary adaptation to temperature, well documented in microbes (Bennett and Lenski, 1993; Mongold et al., 1996), can further alter competitive hierarchies, especially if microbial species have different adaptive potential.

Bottom Line: Several important trade-offs have been identified for prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial taxa that define contrasting ecological strategies and contribute to species coexistence and diversity.The shape, dimensionality, and hierarchy of trade-offs may determine coexistence patterns and need to be better characterized.Global environmental change can alter microbial community composition through altering resource utilization by different microbes and, consequently, may modify biogeochemical impacts of microbes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: W.K. Kellogg Biological Station - Michigan State University Hickory Corners, MI, USA ; Department of Integrative Biology, Michigan State University East Lansing, MI, USA.

ABSTRACT
Trait-based approaches provide a mechanistic framework to understand and predict the structure and functioning of microbial communities. Resource utilization traits and trade-offs are among key microbial traits that describe population dynamics and competition among microbes. Several important trade-offs have been identified for prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial taxa that define contrasting ecological strategies and contribute to species coexistence and diversity. The shape, dimensionality, and hierarchy of trade-offs may determine coexistence patterns and need to be better characterized. Laboratory measured resource utilization traits can be used to explain temporal and spatial structure and dynamics of natural microbial communities and predict biogeochemical impacts. Global environmental change can alter microbial community composition through altering resource utilization by different microbes and, consequently, may modify biogeochemical impacts of microbes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus