Limits...
Microbial resource utilization traits and trade-offs: implications for community structure, functioning, and biogeochemical impacts at present and in the future.

Litchman E, Edwards KF, Klausmeier CA - Front Microbiol (2015)

Bottom Line: Several important trade-offs have been identified for prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial taxa that define contrasting ecological strategies and contribute to species coexistence and diversity.The shape, dimensionality, and hierarchy of trade-offs may determine coexistence patterns and need to be better characterized.Global environmental change can alter microbial community composition through altering resource utilization by different microbes and, consequently, may modify biogeochemical impacts of microbes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: W.K. Kellogg Biological Station - Michigan State University Hickory Corners, MI, USA ; Department of Integrative Biology, Michigan State University East Lansing, MI, USA.

ABSTRACT
Trait-based approaches provide a mechanistic framework to understand and predict the structure and functioning of microbial communities. Resource utilization traits and trade-offs are among key microbial traits that describe population dynamics and competition among microbes. Several important trade-offs have been identified for prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial taxa that define contrasting ecological strategies and contribute to species coexistence and diversity. The shape, dimensionality, and hierarchy of trade-offs may determine coexistence patterns and need to be better characterized. Laboratory measured resource utilization traits can be used to explain temporal and spatial structure and dynamics of natural microbial communities and predict biogeochemical impacts. Global environmental change can alter microbial community composition through altering resource utilization by different microbes and, consequently, may modify biogeochemical impacts of microbes.

No MeSH data available.


Trade-offs between two traits at three hierarchical levels: within-individual phenotypic plasticity, represented as individual curves; within-species genetic variation, represented as differently shaded curves; and within-community interspecific variation, represented as different colored families of curves
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4389539&req=5

Figure 1: Trade-offs between two traits at three hierarchical levels: within-individual phenotypic plasticity, represented as individual curves; within-species genetic variation, represented as differently shaded curves; and within-community interspecific variation, represented as different colored families of curves

Mentions: The notion of trade-offs applies to different levels of biological organization. Resource utilization trade-offs in microbes occur at the subcellular level, when different metabolic networks are compared, at the level of individual cells, within a species across genotypes and, finally, across multiple species and higher taxonomic groups and even communities (Figure 1). For example, a rate-efficiency trade-off is observed in metabolic networks, where networks are either high yield but slower rate or vice versa (Molenaar et al., 2009). The same trade-off is reported for individual species of bacteria (Maharjan et al., 2007; Frank, 2010), across species (Flamholz et al., 2013) and even among communities (Lipson et al., 2009). Identifying and connecting trade-offs at different levels is a formidable challenge but should provide a link across these levels and across disciplines, from systems biology to population and community to ecosystem ecology. Trait diversity at different hierarchical levels will have their own characteristic time scales, which will affect the speed at which communities respond to changing environmental conditions. For example, phenotypic plasticity may maintain ecosystem functioning but slow down evolutionary adaptation by decreasing the fitness differential between genotypes.


Microbial resource utilization traits and trade-offs: implications for community structure, functioning, and biogeochemical impacts at present and in the future.

Litchman E, Edwards KF, Klausmeier CA - Front Microbiol (2015)

Trade-offs between two traits at three hierarchical levels: within-individual phenotypic plasticity, represented as individual curves; within-species genetic variation, represented as differently shaded curves; and within-community interspecific variation, represented as different colored families of curves
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4389539&req=5

Figure 1: Trade-offs between two traits at three hierarchical levels: within-individual phenotypic plasticity, represented as individual curves; within-species genetic variation, represented as differently shaded curves; and within-community interspecific variation, represented as different colored families of curves
Mentions: The notion of trade-offs applies to different levels of biological organization. Resource utilization trade-offs in microbes occur at the subcellular level, when different metabolic networks are compared, at the level of individual cells, within a species across genotypes and, finally, across multiple species and higher taxonomic groups and even communities (Figure 1). For example, a rate-efficiency trade-off is observed in metabolic networks, where networks are either high yield but slower rate or vice versa (Molenaar et al., 2009). The same trade-off is reported for individual species of bacteria (Maharjan et al., 2007; Frank, 2010), across species (Flamholz et al., 2013) and even among communities (Lipson et al., 2009). Identifying and connecting trade-offs at different levels is a formidable challenge but should provide a link across these levels and across disciplines, from systems biology to population and community to ecosystem ecology. Trait diversity at different hierarchical levels will have their own characteristic time scales, which will affect the speed at which communities respond to changing environmental conditions. For example, phenotypic plasticity may maintain ecosystem functioning but slow down evolutionary adaptation by decreasing the fitness differential between genotypes.

Bottom Line: Several important trade-offs have been identified for prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial taxa that define contrasting ecological strategies and contribute to species coexistence and diversity.The shape, dimensionality, and hierarchy of trade-offs may determine coexistence patterns and need to be better characterized.Global environmental change can alter microbial community composition through altering resource utilization by different microbes and, consequently, may modify biogeochemical impacts of microbes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: W.K. Kellogg Biological Station - Michigan State University Hickory Corners, MI, USA ; Department of Integrative Biology, Michigan State University East Lansing, MI, USA.

ABSTRACT
Trait-based approaches provide a mechanistic framework to understand and predict the structure and functioning of microbial communities. Resource utilization traits and trade-offs are among key microbial traits that describe population dynamics and competition among microbes. Several important trade-offs have been identified for prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial taxa that define contrasting ecological strategies and contribute to species coexistence and diversity. The shape, dimensionality, and hierarchy of trade-offs may determine coexistence patterns and need to be better characterized. Laboratory measured resource utilization traits can be used to explain temporal and spatial structure and dynamics of natural microbial communities and predict biogeochemical impacts. Global environmental change can alter microbial community composition through altering resource utilization by different microbes and, consequently, may modify biogeochemical impacts of microbes.

No MeSH data available.