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Comparison of polyurethane with cyanoacrylate in hemostasis of vascular injury in guinea pigs.

Kubrusly LF, Formighieri MS, Lago JV, Graça YL, Sobral AC, Lago MM - Rev Bras Cir Cardiovasc (2015 Jan-Mar)

Bottom Line: In group III, 100% of the animals had mild/severe fibrosis, while in group II only 12.5% showed this degree of fibrosis (P=0.001).Polyurethane derived from castor oil showed similar hemostatic behavior to octyl-2-cyanoacrylate.There was less perivascular tissue response with polyurethane when compared with cyanoacrylate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto do Coração de Curitiba, Curitiba, PR, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the behavior of castor oil-derived polyurethane as a hemostatic agent and tissue response after abdominal aortic injury and to compare it with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate.

Methods: Twenty-four Guinea Pigs were randomly divided into three groups of eight animals (I, II, and III). The infrarenal abdominal aorta was dissected, clamped proximally and distally to the vascular puncture site. In group I (control), hemostasis was achieved with digital pressure; in group II (polyurethane) castor oil-derived polyurethane was applied, and in group III (cyanoacrylate), 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate was used. Group II was subdivided into IIA and IIB according to the time of preparation of the hemostatic agent.

Results: Mean blood loss in groups IIA, IIB and III was 0.002 grams (g), 0.008 g, and 0.170 g, with standard deviation of 0.005 g, 0.005 g, and 0.424 g, respectively (P=0.069). The drying time for cyanoacrylate averaged 81.5 seconds (s) (standard deviation: 51.5 seconds) and 126.1 s (standard deviation: 23.0 s) for polyurethane B (P=0.046). However, there was a trend (P=0.069) for cyanoacrylate to dry more slowly than polyurethane A (mean: 40.5 s; SD: 8.6 s). Furthermore, polyurethane A had a shorter drying time than polyurethane B (P=0.003), mean IIA of 40.5 s (standard deviation: 8.6 s). In group III, 100% of the animals had mild/severe fibrosis, while in group II only 12.5% showed this degree of fibrosis (P=0.001).

Conclusion: Polyurethane derived from castor oil showed similar hemostatic behavior to octyl-2-cyanoacrylate. There was less perivascular tissue response with polyurethane when compared with cyanoacrylate.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Proximal and distal clamping of the aorta with Bulldog De Bakey andhemostasis with polyurethane
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f01: Proximal and distal clamping of the aorta with Bulldog De Bakey andhemostasis with polyurethane

Mentions: In group II, hemostasis was achieved using the bio-based polyurethane sealant inconjunction with a catalyst (at a ratio of 2:1). The mixture was prepared on asterile slide with varying preparation times as mentioned above. For bothsubgroups, the sealant was applied at the puncture site using the bare end of asterile swab stick (Figure 1). To assessthe drying time of the adhesive, the proximal clamp was partially releasedapproximately every 15 seconds and blood loss was estimated. After thepolyurethane drying process was completed, the DeBakey bulldog clamps werereleased and arterial blood flow was restored.


Comparison of polyurethane with cyanoacrylate in hemostasis of vascular injury in guinea pigs.

Kubrusly LF, Formighieri MS, Lago JV, Graça YL, Sobral AC, Lago MM - Rev Bras Cir Cardiovasc (2015 Jan-Mar)

Proximal and distal clamping of the aorta with Bulldog De Bakey andhemostasis with polyurethane
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4389526&req=5

f01: Proximal and distal clamping of the aorta with Bulldog De Bakey andhemostasis with polyurethane
Mentions: In group II, hemostasis was achieved using the bio-based polyurethane sealant inconjunction with a catalyst (at a ratio of 2:1). The mixture was prepared on asterile slide with varying preparation times as mentioned above. For bothsubgroups, the sealant was applied at the puncture site using the bare end of asterile swab stick (Figure 1). To assessthe drying time of the adhesive, the proximal clamp was partially releasedapproximately every 15 seconds and blood loss was estimated. After thepolyurethane drying process was completed, the DeBakey bulldog clamps werereleased and arterial blood flow was restored.

Bottom Line: In group III, 100% of the animals had mild/severe fibrosis, while in group II only 12.5% showed this degree of fibrosis (P=0.001).Polyurethane derived from castor oil showed similar hemostatic behavior to octyl-2-cyanoacrylate.There was less perivascular tissue response with polyurethane when compared with cyanoacrylate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Instituto do Coração de Curitiba, Curitiba, PR, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the behavior of castor oil-derived polyurethane as a hemostatic agent and tissue response after abdominal aortic injury and to compare it with 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate.

Methods: Twenty-four Guinea Pigs were randomly divided into three groups of eight animals (I, II, and III). The infrarenal abdominal aorta was dissected, clamped proximally and distally to the vascular puncture site. In group I (control), hemostasis was achieved with digital pressure; in group II (polyurethane) castor oil-derived polyurethane was applied, and in group III (cyanoacrylate), 2-octyl-cyanoacrylate was used. Group II was subdivided into IIA and IIB according to the time of preparation of the hemostatic agent.

Results: Mean blood loss in groups IIA, IIB and III was 0.002 grams (g), 0.008 g, and 0.170 g, with standard deviation of 0.005 g, 0.005 g, and 0.424 g, respectively (P=0.069). The drying time for cyanoacrylate averaged 81.5 seconds (s) (standard deviation: 51.5 seconds) and 126.1 s (standard deviation: 23.0 s) for polyurethane B (P=0.046). However, there was a trend (P=0.069) for cyanoacrylate to dry more slowly than polyurethane A (mean: 40.5 s; SD: 8.6 s). Furthermore, polyurethane A had a shorter drying time than polyurethane B (P=0.003), mean IIA of 40.5 s (standard deviation: 8.6 s). In group III, 100% of the animals had mild/severe fibrosis, while in group II only 12.5% showed this degree of fibrosis (P=0.001).

Conclusion: Polyurethane derived from castor oil showed similar hemostatic behavior to octyl-2-cyanoacrylate. There was less perivascular tissue response with polyurethane when compared with cyanoacrylate.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus