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Evaluation of the prevalence of stress and its phases in acute myocardial infarction in patients active in the labor market.

Lucinda LB, Prosdócimo AC, de Carvalho KA, Francisco JC, Baena CP, Olandoski M, do Amaral VF, Faria-Neto JR, Guarita-Souza LC - Rev Bras Cir Cardiovasc (2015 Jan-Mar)

Bottom Line: Thirty-one patients (72.1%) presented stress and twelve (27.8%) did not.All women researched presented stress.The results suggest a high level of stress, especially in the resistance phase, in the male infarcted population, hospitalized and active in the labor market.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, Curitiba, PR, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Acute myocardial infarction is a social health problem of epidemiological relevance, with high levels of morbidity and mortality. Stress is one of the modifiable risk factors that triggers acute myocardial infarction. Stress is a result of a set of physiological reactions, which when exaggerated in intensity or duration can lead to imbalances in one's organism, resulting in vulnerability to diseases.

Objective: To identify the presence of stress and its phases in hospitalized and active labor market patients with unstable myocardial infarction and observe its correlation with the life of this population with stress.

Methods: The methodology used was a quantitative, descriptive and transversal research approach conducted with a total of 43 patients, who were still active in the labor market, presenting or not morbidities. Data collection occurred on the fourth day of their hospitalization and patients responded to Lipp's Stress Symptom Inventory for adults.

Results: Thirty-one patients (72.1%) presented stress and twelve (27.8%) did not. In patients with stress, the identified phases were: alert - one patient (3.2%); resistance -twenty-two patients (71.0%); quasi-exhaustion - six patients (19.4%) and exhaustion - two patients (6.5%). All women researched presented stress.

Conclusion: The results suggest a high level of stress, especially in the resistance phase, in the male infarcted population, hospitalized and active in the labor market.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Graphic showing that the percentage of the patients presented criteria forinclusion in stress situations
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f03: Graphic showing that the percentage of the patients presented criteria forinclusion in stress situations

Mentions: 82.1% were sedentary and only 17.9% confirmed to practice physical exercisesregularly (Figure 2). Regarding the body massindex (BMI), the average was 26.4 with standard deviation of ± 4.2. 72% of thepatients presented criteria for inclusion in stress situations and 27% did not(Figure 3).


Evaluation of the prevalence of stress and its phases in acute myocardial infarction in patients active in the labor market.

Lucinda LB, Prosdócimo AC, de Carvalho KA, Francisco JC, Baena CP, Olandoski M, do Amaral VF, Faria-Neto JR, Guarita-Souza LC - Rev Bras Cir Cardiovasc (2015 Jan-Mar)

Graphic showing that the percentage of the patients presented criteria forinclusion in stress situations
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4389525&req=5

f03: Graphic showing that the percentage of the patients presented criteria forinclusion in stress situations
Mentions: 82.1% were sedentary and only 17.9% confirmed to practice physical exercisesregularly (Figure 2). Regarding the body massindex (BMI), the average was 26.4 with standard deviation of ± 4.2. 72% of thepatients presented criteria for inclusion in stress situations and 27% did not(Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Thirty-one patients (72.1%) presented stress and twelve (27.8%) did not.All women researched presented stress.The results suggest a high level of stress, especially in the resistance phase, in the male infarcted population, hospitalized and active in the labor market.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Paraná, Curitiba, PR, Brazil.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Acute myocardial infarction is a social health problem of epidemiological relevance, with high levels of morbidity and mortality. Stress is one of the modifiable risk factors that triggers acute myocardial infarction. Stress is a result of a set of physiological reactions, which when exaggerated in intensity or duration can lead to imbalances in one's organism, resulting in vulnerability to diseases.

Objective: To identify the presence of stress and its phases in hospitalized and active labor market patients with unstable myocardial infarction and observe its correlation with the life of this population with stress.

Methods: The methodology used was a quantitative, descriptive and transversal research approach conducted with a total of 43 patients, who were still active in the labor market, presenting or not morbidities. Data collection occurred on the fourth day of their hospitalization and patients responded to Lipp's Stress Symptom Inventory for adults.

Results: Thirty-one patients (72.1%) presented stress and twelve (27.8%) did not. In patients with stress, the identified phases were: alert - one patient (3.2%); resistance -twenty-two patients (71.0%); quasi-exhaustion - six patients (19.4%) and exhaustion - two patients (6.5%). All women researched presented stress.

Conclusion: The results suggest a high level of stress, especially in the resistance phase, in the male infarcted population, hospitalized and active in the labor market.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus