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Myositis-specific autoantibodies: detection and clinical associations.

van Dooren SH, van Venrooij WJ, Pruijn GJ - Auto Immun Highlights (2011)

Bottom Line: A number of myositis-specific autoantibodies have been identified and these may be associated with distinct IIM subclasses and clinical symptoms.Post-translational modifications that might be associated with the generation of autoantibodies and the development of the disease are discussed as well.In addition, we describe well established autoantibody detection techniques that are currently being used in diagnostic laboratories, as well as novel multiplexed methods.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 271 Department of Biomolecular Chemistry, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
In recent years, the detection and characterization of (novel) autoantibodies is becoming increasingly important for the early diagnosis of autoimmune diseases. The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM, also indicated with myositis) are a group of systemic autoimmune disorders that involve inflammation and weakness of skeletal muscles. One of the hallmarks is the infiltration of inflammatory cells in muscle tissues. A number of myositis-specific autoantibodies have been identified and these may be associated with distinct IIM subclasses and clinical symptoms. Here, we review all myositis-specific autoantibodies identified today as well as their target proteins, together with their clinical associations in IIM patients. Post-translational modifications that might be associated with the generation of autoantibodies and the development of the disease are discussed as well. In addition, we describe well established autoantibody detection techniques that are currently being used in diagnostic laboratories, as well as novel multiplexed methods. The latter techniques provide great opportunities for the simultaneous detection of distinct autoantibodies, but may also contribute to the identification of novel autoantibody profiles, which may have additional diagnostic and prognostic value. The ongoing characterization of novel autoantibody specificities emphasizes the complexity of processes involved in the development of such autoimmune diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Line-blot for autoantibody detection in IIM sera. Strips (vertical) containing a series of recombinant IIM-related autoantigens were incubated with seven IIM patient sera (1–7) and a control serum (8). Antibody binding was visualized using the protocol provided by the manufacturer. The strips were incubated with sera containing the following autoantibodies (1) anti-PL12, (2) anti-EJ, (3) anti-PL7, (4) anti-SRP and anti-Mi-2, (5) anti-Jo-1, (6) anti-PM-Scl75 and anti-PM-Scl100, (7) anti-Ku
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Fig4: Line-blot for autoantibody detection in IIM sera. Strips (vertical) containing a series of recombinant IIM-related autoantigens were incubated with seven IIM patient sera (1–7) and a control serum (8). Antibody binding was visualized using the protocol provided by the manufacturer. The strips were incubated with sera containing the following autoantibodies (1) anti-PL12, (2) anti-EJ, (3) anti-PL7, (4) anti-SRP and anti-Mi-2, (5) anti-Jo-1, (6) anti-PM-Scl75 and anti-PM-Scl100, (7) anti-Ku

Mentions: The line-blot assays, or so-called line immunoassays (LIAs), are based on immunoblotting procedures that spot purified antigens on protein-binding membranes without the need of gel electrophoresis (Fig. 4). The laborious purification procedure of native antigens is being replaced by the more reproducible production of highly purified recombinant antigens or synthetic peptides. These developments contribute to the increased sensitivity and specificity of commercially available line-blots. Several LIAs of different manufacturers have recently been clinically validated in multicenter studies, and the results indicate that LIAs are becoming a suitable alternative to the more costly and complex techniques sometimes used in diagnostic laboratories reviewed by [13, 14].Fig. 4


Myositis-specific autoantibodies: detection and clinical associations.

van Dooren SH, van Venrooij WJ, Pruijn GJ - Auto Immun Highlights (2011)

Line-blot for autoantibody detection in IIM sera. Strips (vertical) containing a series of recombinant IIM-related autoantigens were incubated with seven IIM patient sera (1–7) and a control serum (8). Antibody binding was visualized using the protocol provided by the manufacturer. The strips were incubated with sera containing the following autoantibodies (1) anti-PL12, (2) anti-EJ, (3) anti-PL7, (4) anti-SRP and anti-Mi-2, (5) anti-Jo-1, (6) anti-PM-Scl75 and anti-PM-Scl100, (7) anti-Ku
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4389074&req=5

Fig4: Line-blot for autoantibody detection in IIM sera. Strips (vertical) containing a series of recombinant IIM-related autoantigens were incubated with seven IIM patient sera (1–7) and a control serum (8). Antibody binding was visualized using the protocol provided by the manufacturer. The strips were incubated with sera containing the following autoantibodies (1) anti-PL12, (2) anti-EJ, (3) anti-PL7, (4) anti-SRP and anti-Mi-2, (5) anti-Jo-1, (6) anti-PM-Scl75 and anti-PM-Scl100, (7) anti-Ku
Mentions: The line-blot assays, or so-called line immunoassays (LIAs), are based on immunoblotting procedures that spot purified antigens on protein-binding membranes without the need of gel electrophoresis (Fig. 4). The laborious purification procedure of native antigens is being replaced by the more reproducible production of highly purified recombinant antigens or synthetic peptides. These developments contribute to the increased sensitivity and specificity of commercially available line-blots. Several LIAs of different manufacturers have recently been clinically validated in multicenter studies, and the results indicate that LIAs are becoming a suitable alternative to the more costly and complex techniques sometimes used in diagnostic laboratories reviewed by [13, 14].Fig. 4

Bottom Line: A number of myositis-specific autoantibodies have been identified and these may be associated with distinct IIM subclasses and clinical symptoms.Post-translational modifications that might be associated with the generation of autoantibodies and the development of the disease are discussed as well.In addition, we describe well established autoantibody detection techniques that are currently being used in diagnostic laboratories, as well as novel multiplexed methods.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 271 Department of Biomolecular Chemistry, Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life Sciences, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, PO Box 9101, 6500 HB Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
In recent years, the detection and characterization of (novel) autoantibodies is becoming increasingly important for the early diagnosis of autoimmune diseases. The idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM, also indicated with myositis) are a group of systemic autoimmune disorders that involve inflammation and weakness of skeletal muscles. One of the hallmarks is the infiltration of inflammatory cells in muscle tissues. A number of myositis-specific autoantibodies have been identified and these may be associated with distinct IIM subclasses and clinical symptoms. Here, we review all myositis-specific autoantibodies identified today as well as their target proteins, together with their clinical associations in IIM patients. Post-translational modifications that might be associated with the generation of autoantibodies and the development of the disease are discussed as well. In addition, we describe well established autoantibody detection techniques that are currently being used in diagnostic laboratories, as well as novel multiplexed methods. The latter techniques provide great opportunities for the simultaneous detection of distinct autoantibodies, but may also contribute to the identification of novel autoantibody profiles, which may have additional diagnostic and prognostic value. The ongoing characterization of novel autoantibody specificities emphasizes the complexity of processes involved in the development of such autoimmune diseases.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus