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Parental, prenatal, and neonatal associations with ball skills at age 8 using an exposome approach.

Golding J, Gregory S, Iles-Caven Y, Lingam R, Davis JM, Emmett P, Steer CD, Hibbeln JR - J. Child Neurol. (2014)

Bottom Line: The offspring of parents who described themselves as having poor eyesight had poorer ability.This hypothesis-free approach has identified a strong negative association with an unhappy childhood.Future studies of this cohort will be used to determine whether the mechanism is manifest through differing parenting skills, or a biological mechanism reflecting epigenetic effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Child and Adolescent Health, School of Social & Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom jean.golding@bristol.ac.uk.

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Diagram showing the different types of variables considered in the analysis.
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fig2-0883073814530501: Diagram showing the different types of variables considered in the analysis.

Mentions: We treat the measures using an “exposome” analysis. This is similar to the approach taken in genomewide association studies, being hypothesis free. Rather than testing already formulated hypotheses, a genomewide association study examines associations with as many as 2 million genetic markers for predetermined statistical significance levels and then attempts to replicate the findings in other studies. In general, no adjustment is made for confounders. In the present study, which is a hypothesis generator in regard to the environmental factors, we first assess the relationship of ball skills with each environmental variable categorizing the P values <.05, <.01, and <.001 divided into the times and route of exposure (Figure 2). We then assess whether the numbers of variables identified in this way occur more often than expected by chance. In particular, we look for unexpected patterns of association.


Parental, prenatal, and neonatal associations with ball skills at age 8 using an exposome approach.

Golding J, Gregory S, Iles-Caven Y, Lingam R, Davis JM, Emmett P, Steer CD, Hibbeln JR - J. Child Neurol. (2014)

Diagram showing the different types of variables considered in the analysis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4388909&req=5

fig2-0883073814530501: Diagram showing the different types of variables considered in the analysis.
Mentions: We treat the measures using an “exposome” analysis. This is similar to the approach taken in genomewide association studies, being hypothesis free. Rather than testing already formulated hypotheses, a genomewide association study examines associations with as many as 2 million genetic markers for predetermined statistical significance levels and then attempts to replicate the findings in other studies. In general, no adjustment is made for confounders. In the present study, which is a hypothesis generator in regard to the environmental factors, we first assess the relationship of ball skills with each environmental variable categorizing the P values <.05, <.01, and <.001 divided into the times and route of exposure (Figure 2). We then assess whether the numbers of variables identified in this way occur more often than expected by chance. In particular, we look for unexpected patterns of association.

Bottom Line: The offspring of parents who described themselves as having poor eyesight had poorer ability.This hypothesis-free approach has identified a strong negative association with an unhappy childhood.Future studies of this cohort will be used to determine whether the mechanism is manifest through differing parenting skills, or a biological mechanism reflecting epigenetic effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Child and Adolescent Health, School of Social & Community Medicine, University of Bristol, Bristol, United Kingdom jean.golding@bristol.ac.uk.

Show MeSH