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Seven-day continuous abstinence rate from smoking at 1, 2, or 3 years after the use of varenicline.

Kim JS, Jang JY, Park EH, Lee JY, Gu KM, Jung JW, Choi JC, Shin JW, Park IW, Choi BW, Kim JY - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2015)

Bottom Line: Compared to current smokers, successful quitters were older (55.0 years vs. 49.9 years, p=0.01), had better compliance to the 12-week course (27.7 vs. 9.3%, p=0.01), and had taken varenicline longer (10.1 vs. 5.9 weeks, p=0.01).The preferred ways to cease smoking were will-power (48.1%), varenicline (25.9%), nicotine replacement therapy (11.1%), and others (14.9%).Smokers should be encouraged to stick to the proven way for recommended period of time for successful cessation of smoking.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Varenicline, a selective partial agonist/antagonist of the α4β2 nicotinic receptor, has proven effectiveness for smoking cessation by several randomized, controlled trials. Because few studies have evaluated the long-term efficacy of varenicline, we tried to evaluate the smoking status of varenicline users up to 3 years after the initial prescription of the drug.

Methods: We interviewed varenicline users who were prescribed the drug from June 2007 to May 2010 by telephone, from June 2010 to May 2011.

Results: One-hundred and thirty-three of 250 varenicline users (53.2%) were available for the survey. Seven-day continuous abstinence from smoking was adhered to by 17 of 39 respondents (43.6%) at 1 year, and 11 of 36 (30.6%) and 19 of 58 (32.8%) at 2 and 3 years since the first use of varenicline, respectively. Compared to current smokers, successful quitters were older (55.0 years vs. 49.9 years, p=0.01), had better compliance to the 12-week course (27.7 vs. 9.3%, p=0.01), and had taken varenicline longer (10.1 vs. 5.9 weeks, p=0.01). Fifty-four of 71 current smokers (76.1%) were willing to stop smoking in the near future. The preferred ways to cease smoking were will-power (48.1%), varenicline (25.9%), nicotine replacement therapy (11.1%), and others (14.9%).

Conclusion: Smokers should be encouraged to stick to the proven way for recommended period of time for successful cessation of smoking.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fagerström's nicotine dependence test in patients who failed to stop smoking. The proportion of patients with severe nicotine dependence was 0%, 24.0%, and 30.8% at 1, 2, and 3 years after the first dose of varenicline, respectively, which shows successive increases with each year since the first dose of varenicline (p for trend=0.007). The severity of dependence by score of Fagerström's nicotine dependence test. Mild, 0-3; moderate, 4-6; severe, 7-10.
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Figure 3: Fagerström's nicotine dependence test in patients who failed to stop smoking. The proportion of patients with severe nicotine dependence was 0%, 24.0%, and 30.8% at 1, 2, and 3 years after the first dose of varenicline, respectively, which shows successive increases with each year since the first dose of varenicline (p for trend=0.007). The severity of dependence by score of Fagerström's nicotine dependence test. Mild, 0-3; moderate, 4-6; severe, 7-10.

Mentions: Over half of the 86 patients who failed to quit smoking showed a moderate level of nicotine addiction (Figure 3). The proportion of patients with severe nicotine dependence increased with each year after the first prescription of varenicline (0%, 24.0%, and 30.8%, respectively; p for trend=0.007).


Seven-day continuous abstinence rate from smoking at 1, 2, or 3 years after the use of varenicline.

Kim JS, Jang JY, Park EH, Lee JY, Gu KM, Jung JW, Choi JC, Shin JW, Park IW, Choi BW, Kim JY - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2015)

Fagerström's nicotine dependence test in patients who failed to stop smoking. The proportion of patients with severe nicotine dependence was 0%, 24.0%, and 30.8% at 1, 2, and 3 years after the first dose of varenicline, respectively, which shows successive increases with each year since the first dose of varenicline (p for trend=0.007). The severity of dependence by score of Fagerström's nicotine dependence test. Mild, 0-3; moderate, 4-6; severe, 7-10.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4388906&req=5

Figure 3: Fagerström's nicotine dependence test in patients who failed to stop smoking. The proportion of patients with severe nicotine dependence was 0%, 24.0%, and 30.8% at 1, 2, and 3 years after the first dose of varenicline, respectively, which shows successive increases with each year since the first dose of varenicline (p for trend=0.007). The severity of dependence by score of Fagerström's nicotine dependence test. Mild, 0-3; moderate, 4-6; severe, 7-10.
Mentions: Over half of the 86 patients who failed to quit smoking showed a moderate level of nicotine addiction (Figure 3). The proportion of patients with severe nicotine dependence increased with each year after the first prescription of varenicline (0%, 24.0%, and 30.8%, respectively; p for trend=0.007).

Bottom Line: Compared to current smokers, successful quitters were older (55.0 years vs. 49.9 years, p=0.01), had better compliance to the 12-week course (27.7 vs. 9.3%, p=0.01), and had taken varenicline longer (10.1 vs. 5.9 weeks, p=0.01).The preferred ways to cease smoking were will-power (48.1%), varenicline (25.9%), nicotine replacement therapy (11.1%), and others (14.9%).Smokers should be encouraged to stick to the proven way for recommended period of time for successful cessation of smoking.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Varenicline, a selective partial agonist/antagonist of the α4β2 nicotinic receptor, has proven effectiveness for smoking cessation by several randomized, controlled trials. Because few studies have evaluated the long-term efficacy of varenicline, we tried to evaluate the smoking status of varenicline users up to 3 years after the initial prescription of the drug.

Methods: We interviewed varenicline users who were prescribed the drug from June 2007 to May 2010 by telephone, from June 2010 to May 2011.

Results: One-hundred and thirty-three of 250 varenicline users (53.2%) were available for the survey. Seven-day continuous abstinence from smoking was adhered to by 17 of 39 respondents (43.6%) at 1 year, and 11 of 36 (30.6%) and 19 of 58 (32.8%) at 2 and 3 years since the first use of varenicline, respectively. Compared to current smokers, successful quitters were older (55.0 years vs. 49.9 years, p=0.01), had better compliance to the 12-week course (27.7 vs. 9.3%, p=0.01), and had taken varenicline longer (10.1 vs. 5.9 weeks, p=0.01). Fifty-four of 71 current smokers (76.1%) were willing to stop smoking in the near future. The preferred ways to cease smoking were will-power (48.1%), varenicline (25.9%), nicotine replacement therapy (11.1%), and others (14.9%).

Conclusion: Smokers should be encouraged to stick to the proven way for recommended period of time for successful cessation of smoking.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus