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Seven-day continuous abstinence rate from smoking at 1, 2, or 3 years after the use of varenicline.

Kim JS, Jang JY, Park EH, Lee JY, Gu KM, Jung JW, Choi JC, Shin JW, Park IW, Choi BW, Kim JY - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2015)

Bottom Line: Compared to current smokers, successful quitters were older (55.0 years vs. 49.9 years, p=0.01), had better compliance to the 12-week course (27.7 vs. 9.3%, p=0.01), and had taken varenicline longer (10.1 vs. 5.9 weeks, p=0.01).The preferred ways to cease smoking were will-power (48.1%), varenicline (25.9%), nicotine replacement therapy (11.1%), and others (14.9%).Smokers should be encouraged to stick to the proven way for recommended period of time for successful cessation of smoking.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Varenicline, a selective partial agonist/antagonist of the α4β2 nicotinic receptor, has proven effectiveness for smoking cessation by several randomized, controlled trials. Because few studies have evaluated the long-term efficacy of varenicline, we tried to evaluate the smoking status of varenicline users up to 3 years after the initial prescription of the drug.

Methods: We interviewed varenicline users who were prescribed the drug from June 2007 to May 2010 by telephone, from June 2010 to May 2011.

Results: One-hundred and thirty-three of 250 varenicline users (53.2%) were available for the survey. Seven-day continuous abstinence from smoking was adhered to by 17 of 39 respondents (43.6%) at 1 year, and 11 of 36 (30.6%) and 19 of 58 (32.8%) at 2 and 3 years since the first use of varenicline, respectively. Compared to current smokers, successful quitters were older (55.0 years vs. 49.9 years, p=0.01), had better compliance to the 12-week course (27.7 vs. 9.3%, p=0.01), and had taken varenicline longer (10.1 vs. 5.9 weeks, p=0.01). Fifty-four of 71 current smokers (76.1%) were willing to stop smoking in the near future. The preferred ways to cease smoking were will-power (48.1%), varenicline (25.9%), nicotine replacement therapy (11.1%), and others (14.9%).

Conclusion: Smokers should be encouraged to stick to the proven way for recommended period of time for successful cessation of smoking.

No MeSH data available.


Flow chart of enrollment in the study. Telephone survey was tried from June 2010 to May 2011 around the first, second, or third anniversary dates of these patients' first varenicline prescription.
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Figure 1: Flow chart of enrollment in the study. Telephone survey was tried from June 2010 to May 2011 around the first, second, or third anniversary dates of these patients' first varenicline prescription.

Mentions: Varenicline has been available at our clinic since June 2007. From June 2007 to May 2010, 250 patients have taken varenicline for the purpose of smoking cessation after counseling and education from pulmonologist at the pulmonary clinic of Chung-Ang University Hospital. A telephone survey was conducted from June 2010 through May 2011 around the first, second, or third anniversary dates of these patients' first prescription of varenicline. Smoking cessation status at 3 years since the prescription of the varenicline was collected from the patients who were prescribed the drug from June 2007 to May 2008. In the same way, we evaluated smoking cessation status at 2 years and at 1 year since the use of the drug in patients who took the drug from June 2008 to May 2009 and from June 2009 to May 2010, respectively (Figure 1). This study was approved by Institutional Review Board of Chung-Ang University Hospital.


Seven-day continuous abstinence rate from smoking at 1, 2, or 3 years after the use of varenicline.

Kim JS, Jang JY, Park EH, Lee JY, Gu KM, Jung JW, Choi JC, Shin JW, Park IW, Choi BW, Kim JY - Tuberc Respir Dis (Seoul) (2015)

Flow chart of enrollment in the study. Telephone survey was tried from June 2010 to May 2011 around the first, second, or third anniversary dates of these patients' first varenicline prescription.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4388906&req=5

Figure 1: Flow chart of enrollment in the study. Telephone survey was tried from June 2010 to May 2011 around the first, second, or third anniversary dates of these patients' first varenicline prescription.
Mentions: Varenicline has been available at our clinic since June 2007. From June 2007 to May 2010, 250 patients have taken varenicline for the purpose of smoking cessation after counseling and education from pulmonologist at the pulmonary clinic of Chung-Ang University Hospital. A telephone survey was conducted from June 2010 through May 2011 around the first, second, or third anniversary dates of these patients' first prescription of varenicline. Smoking cessation status at 3 years since the prescription of the varenicline was collected from the patients who were prescribed the drug from June 2007 to May 2008. In the same way, we evaluated smoking cessation status at 2 years and at 1 year since the use of the drug in patients who took the drug from June 2008 to May 2009 and from June 2009 to May 2010, respectively (Figure 1). This study was approved by Institutional Review Board of Chung-Ang University Hospital.

Bottom Line: Compared to current smokers, successful quitters were older (55.0 years vs. 49.9 years, p=0.01), had better compliance to the 12-week course (27.7 vs. 9.3%, p=0.01), and had taken varenicline longer (10.1 vs. 5.9 weeks, p=0.01).The preferred ways to cease smoking were will-power (48.1%), varenicline (25.9%), nicotine replacement therapy (11.1%), and others (14.9%).Smokers should be encouraged to stick to the proven way for recommended period of time for successful cessation of smoking.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Varenicline, a selective partial agonist/antagonist of the α4β2 nicotinic receptor, has proven effectiveness for smoking cessation by several randomized, controlled trials. Because few studies have evaluated the long-term efficacy of varenicline, we tried to evaluate the smoking status of varenicline users up to 3 years after the initial prescription of the drug.

Methods: We interviewed varenicline users who were prescribed the drug from June 2007 to May 2010 by telephone, from June 2010 to May 2011.

Results: One-hundred and thirty-three of 250 varenicline users (53.2%) were available for the survey. Seven-day continuous abstinence from smoking was adhered to by 17 of 39 respondents (43.6%) at 1 year, and 11 of 36 (30.6%) and 19 of 58 (32.8%) at 2 and 3 years since the first use of varenicline, respectively. Compared to current smokers, successful quitters were older (55.0 years vs. 49.9 years, p=0.01), had better compliance to the 12-week course (27.7 vs. 9.3%, p=0.01), and had taken varenicline longer (10.1 vs. 5.9 weeks, p=0.01). Fifty-four of 71 current smokers (76.1%) were willing to stop smoking in the near future. The preferred ways to cease smoking were will-power (48.1%), varenicline (25.9%), nicotine replacement therapy (11.1%), and others (14.9%).

Conclusion: Smokers should be encouraged to stick to the proven way for recommended period of time for successful cessation of smoking.

No MeSH data available.