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Monitor height ergonomics: A comparison of operating room video display terminals.

Kelts GI, McMains KC, Chen PG, Weitzel EK - Allergy Rhinol (Providence) (2015)

Bottom Line: These ranges were then compared to vertical displacement ranges for monitors measured from floor to top of the screen.Analysis of variance with least significant difference post hoc testing identified all minimum distances and vertical ranges to be statistically different (p < 0.001).TcB, TsB and PM systems cannot adequately accommodate all standing, perched or seated surgeons.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Department of Otolaryngology, San Antonio, Texas, USA.

ABSTRACT
A surgeon's eyes should be positioned 1 meter (m) distant and no more than 15° below the top of an operating monitor (0.27 m). We sought to determine which operating room video display terminal can best accommodate ergonomically optimized gaze during surgery. Floor to eye height was measured for surgeons in seated, perched, and standing positions. These ranges were then compared to vertical displacement ranges for monitors measured from floor to top of the screen. Eye height was measured for standing (1.56-1.80 m), perched (1.40-1.65 m), and seated (1.10-1.32 m) positions. The minimum distance (min) between the floor and the top of the monitor and the vertical mobility range (VR) of the monitor were measured throughout a tertiary medical center including towers with boom arms (TcB) (min: 1.58 m, VR: 0.37 m), towers without booms (TsB) (min: 1.82 m, VR: 0.025 m), ceiling mounted booms (CMB) (min: 1.34 m:, VR: 1.04 m), and portable monitors (PM) (min: 1.73 m, VR: 0.04 m). The tangent of 15° declination was used to calculate a correction factor to determine the minimum optimal ergonomic display height. The correction factor was subtracted from the eye height at each position to determine the lowest target height and the highest target floor to eye distance for each position. Analysis of variance with least significant difference post hoc testing identified all minimum distances and vertical ranges to be statistically different (p < 0.001). Monitor vertical displacement varied between styles of carts. CMB video display terminal systems can accommodate standing, perched and the tallest seated surgeons. TcB, TsB and PM systems cannot adequately accommodate all standing, perched or seated surgeons.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Seated position.
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Figure 3: Seated position.

Mentions: The study investigators obtained three measurements that were representative of common surgical positions from eight different members of the otolaryngology residency program. The first measurement was floor-to-eye distance while standing (FTED). The second was FTED while “perched” comfortably on the edge of the chair. The “perched” position was a near standing position with the feet flat on the floor but with the majority of the surgeon's weight supported by the chair (Fig. 2). The third position was the FTED with the surgeon seated comfortably in a surgical chair (Fig. 3). In addition, each surgeon's height was measured.


Monitor height ergonomics: A comparison of operating room video display terminals.

Kelts GI, McMains KC, Chen PG, Weitzel EK - Allergy Rhinol (Providence) (2015)

Seated position.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4388873&req=5

Figure 3: Seated position.
Mentions: The study investigators obtained three measurements that were representative of common surgical positions from eight different members of the otolaryngology residency program. The first measurement was floor-to-eye distance while standing (FTED). The second was FTED while “perched” comfortably on the edge of the chair. The “perched” position was a near standing position with the feet flat on the floor but with the majority of the surgeon's weight supported by the chair (Fig. 2). The third position was the FTED with the surgeon seated comfortably in a surgical chair (Fig. 3). In addition, each surgeon's height was measured.

Bottom Line: These ranges were then compared to vertical displacement ranges for monitors measured from floor to top of the screen.Analysis of variance with least significant difference post hoc testing identified all minimum distances and vertical ranges to be statistically different (p < 0.001).TcB, TsB and PM systems cannot adequately accommodate all standing, perched or seated surgeons.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: San Antonio Uniformed Services Health Education Consortium, Department of Otolaryngology, San Antonio, Texas, USA.

ABSTRACT
A surgeon's eyes should be positioned 1 meter (m) distant and no more than 15° below the top of an operating monitor (0.27 m). We sought to determine which operating room video display terminal can best accommodate ergonomically optimized gaze during surgery. Floor to eye height was measured for surgeons in seated, perched, and standing positions. These ranges were then compared to vertical displacement ranges for monitors measured from floor to top of the screen. Eye height was measured for standing (1.56-1.80 m), perched (1.40-1.65 m), and seated (1.10-1.32 m) positions. The minimum distance (min) between the floor and the top of the monitor and the vertical mobility range (VR) of the monitor were measured throughout a tertiary medical center including towers with boom arms (TcB) (min: 1.58 m, VR: 0.37 m), towers without booms (TsB) (min: 1.82 m, VR: 0.025 m), ceiling mounted booms (CMB) (min: 1.34 m:, VR: 1.04 m), and portable monitors (PM) (min: 1.73 m, VR: 0.04 m). The tangent of 15° declination was used to calculate a correction factor to determine the minimum optimal ergonomic display height. The correction factor was subtracted from the eye height at each position to determine the lowest target height and the highest target floor to eye distance for each position. Analysis of variance with least significant difference post hoc testing identified all minimum distances and vertical ranges to be statistically different (p < 0.001). Monitor vertical displacement varied between styles of carts. CMB video display terminal systems can accommodate standing, perched and the tallest seated surgeons. TcB, TsB and PM systems cannot adequately accommodate all standing, perched or seated surgeons.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus