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Men's facial width-to-height ratio predicts aggression: a meta-analysis.

Haselhuhn MP, Ormiston ME, Wong EM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Recent research has identified men's facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR) as a reliable predictor of aggressive tendencies and behavior.Other research, however, has failed to replicate the fWHR-aggression relationship and has questioned whether previous findings are robust.Our results indicate a small, but significant, positive relationship between men's fWHR and aggression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Business Administration, University of California Riverside, Riverside, California, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Recent research has identified men's facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR) as a reliable predictor of aggressive tendencies and behavior. Other research, however, has failed to replicate the fWHR-aggression relationship and has questioned whether previous findings are robust. In the current paper, we synthesize existing work by conducting a meta-analysis to estimate whether and how fWHR predicts aggression. Our results indicate a small, but significant, positive relationship between men's fWHR and aggression.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Funnel plot.Funnel plot of Z-transformed effect sizes, plotted against their standard error.
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pone.0122637.g002: Funnel plot.Funnel plot of Z-transformed effect sizes, plotted against their standard error.

Mentions: Finally, to address potential concerns of publication bias affecting these results, we constructed a funnel plot of the Z-transformed effect sizes, plotted against their standard error (Fig 2). Although the general shape of the distribution is as expected, with effect sizes with smaller standard errors clustering close to the mean, a visual inspection suggests that a greater number of small or negative effect sizes should have been observed among studies with smaller samples. To detect the risk of potential publication bias, we followed Orwin’s [29] suggested procedure to determine the number of additional studies showing effects that would need to be included in order for the mean effect size to reduce substantially (in this case, in half). The results of this analysis suggest that an additional 21.6 studies with results would need to be included, indicating that publication bias toward large, significant effects is unlikely to fully drive the observed results. Taken together, these analyses suggest a small, but robust, positive association between fWHR and aggression.


Men's facial width-to-height ratio predicts aggression: a meta-analysis.

Haselhuhn MP, Ormiston ME, Wong EM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Funnel plot.Funnel plot of Z-transformed effect sizes, plotted against their standard error.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4388848&req=5

pone.0122637.g002: Funnel plot.Funnel plot of Z-transformed effect sizes, plotted against their standard error.
Mentions: Finally, to address potential concerns of publication bias affecting these results, we constructed a funnel plot of the Z-transformed effect sizes, plotted against their standard error (Fig 2). Although the general shape of the distribution is as expected, with effect sizes with smaller standard errors clustering close to the mean, a visual inspection suggests that a greater number of small or negative effect sizes should have been observed among studies with smaller samples. To detect the risk of potential publication bias, we followed Orwin’s [29] suggested procedure to determine the number of additional studies showing effects that would need to be included in order for the mean effect size to reduce substantially (in this case, in half). The results of this analysis suggest that an additional 21.6 studies with results would need to be included, indicating that publication bias toward large, significant effects is unlikely to fully drive the observed results. Taken together, these analyses suggest a small, but robust, positive association between fWHR and aggression.

Bottom Line: Recent research has identified men's facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR) as a reliable predictor of aggressive tendencies and behavior.Other research, however, has failed to replicate the fWHR-aggression relationship and has questioned whether previous findings are robust.Our results indicate a small, but significant, positive relationship between men's fWHR and aggression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Business Administration, University of California Riverside, Riverside, California, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Recent research has identified men's facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR) as a reliable predictor of aggressive tendencies and behavior. Other research, however, has failed to replicate the fWHR-aggression relationship and has questioned whether previous findings are robust. In the current paper, we synthesize existing work by conducting a meta-analysis to estimate whether and how fWHR predicts aggression. Our results indicate a small, but significant, positive relationship between men's fWHR and aggression.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus