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Men's facial width-to-height ratio predicts aggression: a meta-analysis.

Haselhuhn MP, Ormiston ME, Wong EM - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: Recent research has identified men's facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR) as a reliable predictor of aggressive tendencies and behavior.Other research, however, has failed to replicate the fWHR-aggression relationship and has questioned whether previous findings are robust.Our results indicate a small, but significant, positive relationship between men's fWHR and aggression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Business Administration, University of California Riverside, Riverside, California, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Recent research has identified men's facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR) as a reliable predictor of aggressive tendencies and behavior. Other research, however, has failed to replicate the fWHR-aggression relationship and has questioned whether previous findings are robust. In the current paper, we synthesize existing work by conducting a meta-analysis to estimate whether and how fWHR predicts aggression. Our results indicate a small, but significant, positive relationship between men's fWHR and aggression.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

PRISMA flow chart.PRISMA flowchart detailing selection of studies included in meta-analysis.
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pone.0122637.g001: PRISMA flow chart.PRISMA flowchart detailing selection of studies included in meta-analysis.

Mentions: Finally, we read each paper to determine whether the dependent measure captured aggression. We included both scale measures of aggression, as well as direct behavioral measures (e.g., physical violence). In addition, we included articles in which the authors theorized that the dependent measure represented aggressive behavior (e.g., deception, untrustworthiness). Below, we conduct analyses both including and excluding these additional studies. These selection processes resulted in a final collection of 14 articles, [2, 6–7, 17–26], 19 studies, 32 effect sizes, and a total reported sample of 4327 participants (Figs 1 and S1; Table 1). We adopted correlation coefficients as our common measure of effect sizes.


Men's facial width-to-height ratio predicts aggression: a meta-analysis.

Haselhuhn MP, Ormiston ME, Wong EM - PLoS ONE (2015)

PRISMA flow chart.PRISMA flowchart detailing selection of studies included in meta-analysis.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4388848&req=5

pone.0122637.g001: PRISMA flow chart.PRISMA flowchart detailing selection of studies included in meta-analysis.
Mentions: Finally, we read each paper to determine whether the dependent measure captured aggression. We included both scale measures of aggression, as well as direct behavioral measures (e.g., physical violence). In addition, we included articles in which the authors theorized that the dependent measure represented aggressive behavior (e.g., deception, untrustworthiness). Below, we conduct analyses both including and excluding these additional studies. These selection processes resulted in a final collection of 14 articles, [2, 6–7, 17–26], 19 studies, 32 effect sizes, and a total reported sample of 4327 participants (Figs 1 and S1; Table 1). We adopted correlation coefficients as our common measure of effect sizes.

Bottom Line: Recent research has identified men's facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR) as a reliable predictor of aggressive tendencies and behavior.Other research, however, has failed to replicate the fWHR-aggression relationship and has questioned whether previous findings are robust.Our results indicate a small, but significant, positive relationship between men's fWHR and aggression.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Business Administration, University of California Riverside, Riverside, California, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
Recent research has identified men's facial width-to-height ratio (fWHR) as a reliable predictor of aggressive tendencies and behavior. Other research, however, has failed to replicate the fWHR-aggression relationship and has questioned whether previous findings are robust. In the current paper, we synthesize existing work by conducting a meta-analysis to estimate whether and how fWHR predicts aggression. Our results indicate a small, but significant, positive relationship between men's fWHR and aggression.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus