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Fusarium oxysporum triggers tissue-specific transcriptional reprogramming in Arabidopsis thaliana.

Lyons R, Stiller J, Powell J, Rusu A, Manners JM, Kazan K - PLoS ONE (2015)

Bottom Line: At least half of the genes induced or repressed by F. oxysporum showed tissue-specific regulation.Regulators of auxin and ABA signalling, mannose binding lectins and peroxidases showed strong differential expression in root tissue.We demonstrate that ARF2 and PRX33, two genes regulated in the roots, promote susceptibility to F. oxysporum.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CSIRO Agriculture Flagship, Queensland Bioscience Precinct, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Some of the most devastating agricultural diseases are caused by root-infecting pathogens, yet the majority of studies on these interactions to date have focused on the host responses of aerial tissues rather than those belowground. Fusarium oxysporum is a root-infecting pathogen that causes wilt disease on several plant species including Arabidopsis thaliana. To investigate and compare transcriptional changes triggered by F. oxysporum in different Arabidopsis tissues, we infected soil-grown plants with F. oxysporum and subjected root and leaf tissue harvested at early and late timepoints to RNA-seq analyses. At least half of the genes induced or repressed by F. oxysporum showed tissue-specific regulation. Regulators of auxin and ABA signalling, mannose binding lectins and peroxidases showed strong differential expression in root tissue. We demonstrate that ARF2 and PRX33, two genes regulated in the roots, promote susceptibility to F. oxysporum. In the leaves, defensins and genes associated with the response to auxin, cold and senescence were strongly regulated while jasmonate biosynthesis and signalling genes were induced throughout the plant.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Key processes that undergo transcriptional reprogramming in response to F. oxysporum infection.Arrows indicate trend of transcriptional regulation in each of the functional categories, which were chosen based on the strength of the transcriptional response strength and the number of genes regulated. An example of a gene in each functional category is given. Upon perception of F. oxysporum in the roots, the basal defence response is elicited. F. oxysporum effectors, toxins and hormone mimics such as bioactive JAs trigger transcriptional changes and production of host-derived signalling compounds. Systemic movement of both fungal and host derived signalling molecules elicit transcriptional changes in the leaves ahead of the fungus. Transcriptional changes in both tissues are a consequence of active defence responses (i.e. production of antifungal compounds, defence signalling) F. oxysporum- driven manipulation (i.e. increased senescence in the leaves to facilitate necrotrophic infection), and the response of the plant to stress incurred by infection (i.e. changes in photosynthesis and flowering time minimise the fitness cost to the plant).
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pone.0121902.g003: Key processes that undergo transcriptional reprogramming in response to F. oxysporum infection.Arrows indicate trend of transcriptional regulation in each of the functional categories, which were chosen based on the strength of the transcriptional response strength and the number of genes regulated. An example of a gene in each functional category is given. Upon perception of F. oxysporum in the roots, the basal defence response is elicited. F. oxysporum effectors, toxins and hormone mimics such as bioactive JAs trigger transcriptional changes and production of host-derived signalling compounds. Systemic movement of both fungal and host derived signalling molecules elicit transcriptional changes in the leaves ahead of the fungus. Transcriptional changes in both tissues are a consequence of active defence responses (i.e. production of antifungal compounds, defence signalling) F. oxysporum- driven manipulation (i.e. increased senescence in the leaves to facilitate necrotrophic infection), and the response of the plant to stress incurred by infection (i.e. changes in photosynthesis and flowering time minimise the fitness cost to the plant).

Mentions: Gene ontology (GO) term singular enrichment analysis was used to identify differences in functionality between genes regulated in roots and shoots (Table C in S1 File). In general, the most significantly overrepresented functional categories were defense-related. Fig 3 summarises key processes that are transcriptionally responsive to F. oxysporum in A. thaliana. The observed induction of JA-associated genes and auxin biosynthesis genes and repression of photosynthetic genes in the leaves is consistent with trends found in previous transcriptomic studies [11, 20]. F. oxysporum-regulation of mannose binding lectins and cold-responsive genes has not been described in detail elsewhere.


Fusarium oxysporum triggers tissue-specific transcriptional reprogramming in Arabidopsis thaliana.

Lyons R, Stiller J, Powell J, Rusu A, Manners JM, Kazan K - PLoS ONE (2015)

Key processes that undergo transcriptional reprogramming in response to F. oxysporum infection.Arrows indicate trend of transcriptional regulation in each of the functional categories, which were chosen based on the strength of the transcriptional response strength and the number of genes regulated. An example of a gene in each functional category is given. Upon perception of F. oxysporum in the roots, the basal defence response is elicited. F. oxysporum effectors, toxins and hormone mimics such as bioactive JAs trigger transcriptional changes and production of host-derived signalling compounds. Systemic movement of both fungal and host derived signalling molecules elicit transcriptional changes in the leaves ahead of the fungus. Transcriptional changes in both tissues are a consequence of active defence responses (i.e. production of antifungal compounds, defence signalling) F. oxysporum- driven manipulation (i.e. increased senescence in the leaves to facilitate necrotrophic infection), and the response of the plant to stress incurred by infection (i.e. changes in photosynthesis and flowering time minimise the fitness cost to the plant).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4388846&req=5

pone.0121902.g003: Key processes that undergo transcriptional reprogramming in response to F. oxysporum infection.Arrows indicate trend of transcriptional regulation in each of the functional categories, which were chosen based on the strength of the transcriptional response strength and the number of genes regulated. An example of a gene in each functional category is given. Upon perception of F. oxysporum in the roots, the basal defence response is elicited. F. oxysporum effectors, toxins and hormone mimics such as bioactive JAs trigger transcriptional changes and production of host-derived signalling compounds. Systemic movement of both fungal and host derived signalling molecules elicit transcriptional changes in the leaves ahead of the fungus. Transcriptional changes in both tissues are a consequence of active defence responses (i.e. production of antifungal compounds, defence signalling) F. oxysporum- driven manipulation (i.e. increased senescence in the leaves to facilitate necrotrophic infection), and the response of the plant to stress incurred by infection (i.e. changes in photosynthesis and flowering time minimise the fitness cost to the plant).
Mentions: Gene ontology (GO) term singular enrichment analysis was used to identify differences in functionality between genes regulated in roots and shoots (Table C in S1 File). In general, the most significantly overrepresented functional categories were defense-related. Fig 3 summarises key processes that are transcriptionally responsive to F. oxysporum in A. thaliana. The observed induction of JA-associated genes and auxin biosynthesis genes and repression of photosynthetic genes in the leaves is consistent with trends found in previous transcriptomic studies [11, 20]. F. oxysporum-regulation of mannose binding lectins and cold-responsive genes has not been described in detail elsewhere.

Bottom Line: At least half of the genes induced or repressed by F. oxysporum showed tissue-specific regulation.Regulators of auxin and ABA signalling, mannose binding lectins and peroxidases showed strong differential expression in root tissue.We demonstrate that ARF2 and PRX33, two genes regulated in the roots, promote susceptibility to F. oxysporum.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: CSIRO Agriculture Flagship, Queensland Bioscience Precinct, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Some of the most devastating agricultural diseases are caused by root-infecting pathogens, yet the majority of studies on these interactions to date have focused on the host responses of aerial tissues rather than those belowground. Fusarium oxysporum is a root-infecting pathogen that causes wilt disease on several plant species including Arabidopsis thaliana. To investigate and compare transcriptional changes triggered by F. oxysporum in different Arabidopsis tissues, we infected soil-grown plants with F. oxysporum and subjected root and leaf tissue harvested at early and late timepoints to RNA-seq analyses. At least half of the genes induced or repressed by F. oxysporum showed tissue-specific regulation. Regulators of auxin and ABA signalling, mannose binding lectins and peroxidases showed strong differential expression in root tissue. We demonstrate that ARF2 and PRX33, two genes regulated in the roots, promote susceptibility to F. oxysporum. In the leaves, defensins and genes associated with the response to auxin, cold and senescence were strongly regulated while jasmonate biosynthesis and signalling genes were induced throughout the plant.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus