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Hypothetical exposure limits for oil-based metalworking fluids and cardiovascular mortality in a cohort of autoworkers: structural accelerated failure time models in a public health framework.

Picciotto S, Peters A, Eisen EA - Am. J. Epidemiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Banning oil-based fluids would have saved an estimated 4,003 (95% confidence interval: 2,200, 5,807) life-years among those who died of ischemic heart disease.Estimates for cardiovascular disease overall, acute myocardial infarction, and cerebrovascular disease were 3,500 (95% confidence interval: 1,350, 5,651), 2,932 (95% confidence interval: 1,587, 4,277), and 917 (95% confidence interval: -80, 1,913) life-years, respectively.A limit of 0.01 mg/m(3) would have had a similar impact on cerebrovascular disease but one only half as great on ischemic heart disease.

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Number of years of life that could have been saved among workers who died of acute myocardial infarction by enforcing various occupational exposure limits for oil-based metalworking fluids, United AutoWorkers–General Motors cohort, 1941–1995.
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KWU484F3: Number of years of life that could have been saved among workers who died of acute myocardial infarction by enforcing various occupational exposure limits for oil-based metalworking fluids, United AutoWorkers–General Motors cohort, 1941–1995.

Mentions: The associations of AMI mortality with exposure (Figure 3) were similar to those for IHD. IHD excluding AMI also showed positive estimates when analyzed separately, whereas cardiovascular death not due to IHD or cerebrovascular disease appeared unrelated to exposures to straight metalworking fluid (data not shown).Figure 3.


Hypothetical exposure limits for oil-based metalworking fluids and cardiovascular mortality in a cohort of autoworkers: structural accelerated failure time models in a public health framework.

Picciotto S, Peters A, Eisen EA - Am. J. Epidemiol. (2015)

Number of years of life that could have been saved among workers who died of acute myocardial infarction by enforcing various occupational exposure limits for oil-based metalworking fluids, United AutoWorkers–General Motors cohort, 1941–1995.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4388016&req=5

KWU484F3: Number of years of life that could have been saved among workers who died of acute myocardial infarction by enforcing various occupational exposure limits for oil-based metalworking fluids, United AutoWorkers–General Motors cohort, 1941–1995.
Mentions: The associations of AMI mortality with exposure (Figure 3) were similar to those for IHD. IHD excluding AMI also showed positive estimates when analyzed separately, whereas cardiovascular death not due to IHD or cerebrovascular disease appeared unrelated to exposures to straight metalworking fluid (data not shown).Figure 3.

Bottom Line: Banning oil-based fluids would have saved an estimated 4,003 (95% confidence interval: 2,200, 5,807) life-years among those who died of ischemic heart disease.Estimates for cardiovascular disease overall, acute myocardial infarction, and cerebrovascular disease were 3,500 (95% confidence interval: 1,350, 5,651), 2,932 (95% confidence interval: 1,587, 4,277), and 917 (95% confidence interval: -80, 1,913) life-years, respectively.A limit of 0.01 mg/m(3) would have had a similar impact on cerebrovascular disease but one only half as great on ischemic heart disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus