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Hypothetical exposure limits for oil-based metalworking fluids and cardiovascular mortality in a cohort of autoworkers: structural accelerated failure time models in a public health framework.

Picciotto S, Peters A, Eisen EA - Am. J. Epidemiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: Banning oil-based fluids would have saved an estimated 4,003 (95% confidence interval: 2,200, 5,807) life-years among those who died of ischemic heart disease.Estimates for cardiovascular disease overall, acute myocardial infarction, and cerebrovascular disease were 3,500 (95% confidence interval: 1,350, 5,651), 2,932 (95% confidence interval: 1,587, 4,277), and 917 (95% confidence interval: -80, 1,913) life-years, respectively.A limit of 0.01 mg/m(3) would have had a similar impact on cerebrovascular disease but one only half as great on ischemic heart disease.

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Number of years of life that could have been saved among workers who died of cardiovascular disease by enforcing various occupational exposure limits for oil-based metalworking fluids, United AutoWorkers–General Motors cohort, 1941–1995.
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KWU484F1: Number of years of life that could have been saved among workers who died of cardiovascular disease by enforcing various occupational exposure limits for oil-based metalworking fluids, United AutoWorkers–General Motors cohort, 1941–1995.

Mentions: Figure 1 shows the estimates of the population effects on cardiovascular mortality under the different exposure limits. Although a ban is estimated to have a reasonably strong impact, the magnitude quickly decreases for exposure limits only slightly above 0.Figure 1.


Hypothetical exposure limits for oil-based metalworking fluids and cardiovascular mortality in a cohort of autoworkers: structural accelerated failure time models in a public health framework.

Picciotto S, Peters A, Eisen EA - Am. J. Epidemiol. (2015)

Number of years of life that could have been saved among workers who died of cardiovascular disease by enforcing various occupational exposure limits for oil-based metalworking fluids, United AutoWorkers–General Motors cohort, 1941–1995.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4388016&req=5

KWU484F1: Number of years of life that could have been saved among workers who died of cardiovascular disease by enforcing various occupational exposure limits for oil-based metalworking fluids, United AutoWorkers–General Motors cohort, 1941–1995.
Mentions: Figure 1 shows the estimates of the population effects on cardiovascular mortality under the different exposure limits. Although a ban is estimated to have a reasonably strong impact, the magnitude quickly decreases for exposure limits only slightly above 0.Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Banning oil-based fluids would have saved an estimated 4,003 (95% confidence interval: 2,200, 5,807) life-years among those who died of ischemic heart disease.Estimates for cardiovascular disease overall, acute myocardial infarction, and cerebrovascular disease were 3,500 (95% confidence interval: 1,350, 5,651), 2,932 (95% confidence interval: 1,587, 4,277), and 917 (95% confidence interval: -80, 1,913) life-years, respectively.A limit of 0.01 mg/m(3) would have had a similar impact on cerebrovascular disease but one only half as great on ischemic heart disease.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus