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Cardiovascular research publications from Latin America between 1999 and 2008. A bibliometric study.

Colantonio LD, Baldridge AS, Huffman MD, Bloomfield GS, Prabhakaran D - Arq. Bras. Cardiol. (2015)

Bottom Line: The analysis was repeated for Latin America as a region, and compared with that for the rest of the countries grouped according to economic development.However, the citation indices of Latin America increased 1.5% (1.3%-1.7%) annually, a lower increase than those of all other country groups analyzed.Although the number of cardiovascular publications of Latin America increased from 1999 to 2008, trends on citation indices suggest they may have had a relatively low impact on the research field, stressing the importance of considering quality and dissemination on local research policies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, University of Alabama, Birmingham School of Public Health, Birmingham, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Cardiovascular research publications seem to be increasing in Latin America overall.

Objective: To analyze trends in cardiovascular publications and their citations from countries in Latin America between 1999 and 2008, and to compare them with those from the rest of the countries.

Methods: We retrieved references of cardiovascular publications between 1999 and 2008 and their five-year post-publication citations from the Web of Knowledge database. For countries in Latin America, we calculated the total number of publications and their citation indices (total citations divided by number of publications) by year. We analyzed trends on publications and citation indices over time using Poisson regression models. The analysis was repeated for Latin America as a region, and compared with that for the rest of the countries grouped according to economic development.

Results: Brazil (n = 6,132) had the highest number of publications in 1999-2008, followed by Argentina (n = 1,686), Mexico (n = 1,368) and Chile (n = 874). Most countries showed an increase in publications over time, leaded by Guatemala (36.5% annually [95%CI: 16.7%-59.7%]), Colombia (22.1% [16.3%-28.2%]), Costa Rica (18.1% [8.1%-28.9%]) and Brazil (17.9% [16.9%-19.1%]). However, trends on citation indices varied widely (from -33.8% to 28.4%). From 1999 to 2008, cardiovascular publications of Latin America increased by 12.9% (12.1%-13.5%) annually. However, the citation indices of Latin America increased 1.5% (1.3%-1.7%) annually, a lower increase than those of all other country groups analyzed.

Conclusions: Although the number of cardiovascular publications of Latin America increased from 1999 to 2008, trends on citation indices suggest they may have had a relatively low impact on the research field, stressing the importance of considering quality and dissemination on local research policies.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Cardiovascular publications (integer counts) versus HDI and GPD per capita foreach country in Latin America in 2008. List of countries: AR: Argentina; BO:Bolivia; BR: Brazil; CL: Chile; CO: Colombia; CR: Costa Rica; CU: Cuba; DO:Dominican Republic; EC: Ecuador; ES: El Salvador; GT: Guatemala; MX: Mexico;PA: Panama; PE: Peru; PY: Paraguay; UY: Uruguay; VE: Venezuela. GDP: grossdomestic product; HDI: human development index. For Cuba, no GDP data wereavailable.
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f03: Cardiovascular publications (integer counts) versus HDI and GPD per capita foreach country in Latin America in 2008. List of countries: AR: Argentina; BO:Bolivia; BR: Brazil; CL: Chile; CO: Colombia; CR: Costa Rica; CU: Cuba; DO:Dominican Republic; EC: Ecuador; ES: El Salvador; GT: Guatemala; MX: Mexico;PA: Panama; PE: Peru; PY: Paraguay; UY: Uruguay; VE: Venezuela. GDP: grossdomestic product; HDI: human development index. For Cuba, no GDP data wereavailable.

Mentions: Figure 3 shows the number of cardiovascularpublications versus HDI and GDP per capita in 2008. Overall, the number ofcardiovascular publications was higher among the countries with higher developmentindicators. In contrast, we found no association between citation indices and HDI orGDP per capita in 2008 (Figure 4). We foundsimilar results when number of cardiovascular publications and citation index wereanalyzed versus development indicators in 2000 (data not shown).


Cardiovascular research publications from Latin America between 1999 and 2008. A bibliometric study.

Colantonio LD, Baldridge AS, Huffman MD, Bloomfield GS, Prabhakaran D - Arq. Bras. Cardiol. (2015)

Cardiovascular publications (integer counts) versus HDI and GPD per capita foreach country in Latin America in 2008. List of countries: AR: Argentina; BO:Bolivia; BR: Brazil; CL: Chile; CO: Colombia; CR: Costa Rica; CU: Cuba; DO:Dominican Republic; EC: Ecuador; ES: El Salvador; GT: Guatemala; MX: Mexico;PA: Panama; PE: Peru; PY: Paraguay; UY: Uruguay; VE: Venezuela. GDP: grossdomestic product; HDI: human development index. For Cuba, no GDP data wereavailable.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4387606&req=5

f03: Cardiovascular publications (integer counts) versus HDI and GPD per capita foreach country in Latin America in 2008. List of countries: AR: Argentina; BO:Bolivia; BR: Brazil; CL: Chile; CO: Colombia; CR: Costa Rica; CU: Cuba; DO:Dominican Republic; EC: Ecuador; ES: El Salvador; GT: Guatemala; MX: Mexico;PA: Panama; PE: Peru; PY: Paraguay; UY: Uruguay; VE: Venezuela. GDP: grossdomestic product; HDI: human development index. For Cuba, no GDP data wereavailable.
Mentions: Figure 3 shows the number of cardiovascularpublications versus HDI and GDP per capita in 2008. Overall, the number ofcardiovascular publications was higher among the countries with higher developmentindicators. In contrast, we found no association between citation indices and HDI orGDP per capita in 2008 (Figure 4). We foundsimilar results when number of cardiovascular publications and citation index wereanalyzed versus development indicators in 2000 (data not shown).

Bottom Line: The analysis was repeated for Latin America as a region, and compared with that for the rest of the countries grouped according to economic development.However, the citation indices of Latin America increased 1.5% (1.3%-1.7%) annually, a lower increase than those of all other country groups analyzed.Although the number of cardiovascular publications of Latin America increased from 1999 to 2008, trends on citation indices suggest they may have had a relatively low impact on the research field, stressing the importance of considering quality and dissemination on local research policies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology, University of Alabama, Birmingham School of Public Health, Birmingham, USA.

ABSTRACT

Background: Cardiovascular research publications seem to be increasing in Latin America overall.

Objective: To analyze trends in cardiovascular publications and their citations from countries in Latin America between 1999 and 2008, and to compare them with those from the rest of the countries.

Methods: We retrieved references of cardiovascular publications between 1999 and 2008 and their five-year post-publication citations from the Web of Knowledge database. For countries in Latin America, we calculated the total number of publications and their citation indices (total citations divided by number of publications) by year. We analyzed trends on publications and citation indices over time using Poisson regression models. The analysis was repeated for Latin America as a region, and compared with that for the rest of the countries grouped according to economic development.

Results: Brazil (n = 6,132) had the highest number of publications in 1999-2008, followed by Argentina (n = 1,686), Mexico (n = 1,368) and Chile (n = 874). Most countries showed an increase in publications over time, leaded by Guatemala (36.5% annually [95%CI: 16.7%-59.7%]), Colombia (22.1% [16.3%-28.2%]), Costa Rica (18.1% [8.1%-28.9%]) and Brazil (17.9% [16.9%-19.1%]). However, trends on citation indices varied widely (from -33.8% to 28.4%). From 1999 to 2008, cardiovascular publications of Latin America increased by 12.9% (12.1%-13.5%) annually. However, the citation indices of Latin America increased 1.5% (1.3%-1.7%) annually, a lower increase than those of all other country groups analyzed.

Conclusions: Although the number of cardiovascular publications of Latin America increased from 1999 to 2008, trends on citation indices suggest they may have had a relatively low impact on the research field, stressing the importance of considering quality and dissemination on local research policies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus