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Acanthamoeba species in Swimming Pools of Cairo, Egypt.

Al-Herrawy A, Bahgat M, Mohammed AE, Ashour A, Hikal W - Iran J Parasitol (2014 Apr-Jun)

Bottom Line: The molecularly confirmed Acanthamoeba isolates were morphologically identified to the species level.All the identified species of Acanthamoeba were molecularly confirmed to be related to the genus Acanthamoeba.The culture method is cheaper and easier than PCR techniques that are faster for the detection of free-living amoebae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Parasitology Laboratory, Water Pollution Research Department, NRC, 12622 Dokki, Giza, Egypt.

ABSTRACT

Background: The free-living amoebae Acanthamoeba spp. have been recognized as etiologic agents of amoebic encephalitis, keratitis, otitis, lung lesions and other skin infections mainly in immuno-compromised individuals. The purpose of this study is to detect the presence of Acanthamoeba in swimming pools in Egypt using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method.

Methods: Water samples were collected from 10 different swimming pools in Cairo, Egypt. Samples were cultured on non-nutrient agar for the detection of Acanthamoeba isolates that were confirmed by PCR amplification using genus specific primers. The molecularly confirmed Acanthamoeba isolates were morphologically identified to the species level.

Results: Members of genus Acanthamoeba were detected in 49.2% of the examined swimming-pool water samples. Morphologically, six Acanthamoeba species were isolated from the examined swimming pool water namely A. polyphaga, A.castellanii, A. rhysodes, A. mauritaniensis, A. royreba and A. triangularis. All the identified species of Acanthamoeba were molecularly confirmed to be related to the genus Acanthamoeba.

Conclusion: The isolated species of Acanthamoeba could provoke variable degrees of infections to the swimmers. The culture method is cheaper and easier than PCR techniques that are faster for the detection of free-living amoebae.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Agarose gel electrophoresis showing amplification of 18S rDNA of different Acanthamoeba isolates were subjected to electrophoresis on 1.5% agarose gel parallel containing ethidium bromide to 100bp DNA. C: negative control bacteria; 1: A. polyphaga; 2: A. mauritaniensis;3: A. castellanii;4: A. polyphaga;5: A. royreba;6: A. castellanii;7: A. triangularis; 8: A. rhysodes;9: A. castellanii;10: A. polyphaga. M: 100bp DNA ladder
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Figure 2: Agarose gel electrophoresis showing amplification of 18S rDNA of different Acanthamoeba isolates were subjected to electrophoresis on 1.5% agarose gel parallel containing ethidium bromide to 100bp DNA. C: negative control bacteria; 1: A. polyphaga; 2: A. mauritaniensis;3: A. castellanii;4: A. polyphaga;5: A. royreba;6: A. castellanii;7: A. triangularis; 8: A. rhysodes;9: A. castellanii;10: A. polyphaga. M: 100bp DNA ladder

Mentions: Microscopically Acanthamoeba +ve swimming pool samples collected from site 1 (n=7), 3 (n=6), 5 (n=5), 6 (n=10), 8 (n=8) and 10 (n=10) were all +ve by PCR. 85.7, 66.7 and 66.7% of microscopically Acanthamoeba +ve swimming pool samples collected from sites 9, 2 and 7, respectively, proved to be +ve by PCR. Electrophoresis of amplification products from 18S rDNA of different Acanthamoeba species were subjected to electrophoresis on 1.5% agarose gel parallel containing ethidium bromide to 100 bp DNA ladder and products from control negative bacteria, where 910-1170 bp specific amplification products were visualized in most of environmental samples tested that were not evidenced in the negative control (Fig. 2).


Acanthamoeba species in Swimming Pools of Cairo, Egypt.

Al-Herrawy A, Bahgat M, Mohammed AE, Ashour A, Hikal W - Iran J Parasitol (2014 Apr-Jun)

Agarose gel electrophoresis showing amplification of 18S rDNA of different Acanthamoeba isolates were subjected to electrophoresis on 1.5% agarose gel parallel containing ethidium bromide to 100bp DNA. C: negative control bacteria; 1: A. polyphaga; 2: A. mauritaniensis;3: A. castellanii;4: A. polyphaga;5: A. royreba;6: A. castellanii;7: A. triangularis; 8: A. rhysodes;9: A. castellanii;10: A. polyphaga. M: 100bp DNA ladder
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4386039&req=5

Figure 2: Agarose gel electrophoresis showing amplification of 18S rDNA of different Acanthamoeba isolates were subjected to electrophoresis on 1.5% agarose gel parallel containing ethidium bromide to 100bp DNA. C: negative control bacteria; 1: A. polyphaga; 2: A. mauritaniensis;3: A. castellanii;4: A. polyphaga;5: A. royreba;6: A. castellanii;7: A. triangularis; 8: A. rhysodes;9: A. castellanii;10: A. polyphaga. M: 100bp DNA ladder
Mentions: Microscopically Acanthamoeba +ve swimming pool samples collected from site 1 (n=7), 3 (n=6), 5 (n=5), 6 (n=10), 8 (n=8) and 10 (n=10) were all +ve by PCR. 85.7, 66.7 and 66.7% of microscopically Acanthamoeba +ve swimming pool samples collected from sites 9, 2 and 7, respectively, proved to be +ve by PCR. Electrophoresis of amplification products from 18S rDNA of different Acanthamoeba species were subjected to electrophoresis on 1.5% agarose gel parallel containing ethidium bromide to 100 bp DNA ladder and products from control negative bacteria, where 910-1170 bp specific amplification products were visualized in most of environmental samples tested that were not evidenced in the negative control (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: The molecularly confirmed Acanthamoeba isolates were morphologically identified to the species level.All the identified species of Acanthamoeba were molecularly confirmed to be related to the genus Acanthamoeba.The culture method is cheaper and easier than PCR techniques that are faster for the detection of free-living amoebae.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Parasitology Laboratory, Water Pollution Research Department, NRC, 12622 Dokki, Giza, Egypt.

ABSTRACT

Background: The free-living amoebae Acanthamoeba spp. have been recognized as etiologic agents of amoebic encephalitis, keratitis, otitis, lung lesions and other skin infections mainly in immuno-compromised individuals. The purpose of this study is to detect the presence of Acanthamoeba in swimming pools in Egypt using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method.

Methods: Water samples were collected from 10 different swimming pools in Cairo, Egypt. Samples were cultured on non-nutrient agar for the detection of Acanthamoeba isolates that were confirmed by PCR amplification using genus specific primers. The molecularly confirmed Acanthamoeba isolates were morphologically identified to the species level.

Results: Members of genus Acanthamoeba were detected in 49.2% of the examined swimming-pool water samples. Morphologically, six Acanthamoeba species were isolated from the examined swimming pool water namely A. polyphaga, A.castellanii, A. rhysodes, A. mauritaniensis, A. royreba and A. triangularis. All the identified species of Acanthamoeba were molecularly confirmed to be related to the genus Acanthamoeba.

Conclusion: The isolated species of Acanthamoeba could provoke variable degrees of infections to the swimmers. The culture method is cheaper and easier than PCR techniques that are faster for the detection of free-living amoebae.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus