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The impact of eliminating age inequalities in stage at diagnosis on breast cancer survival for older women.

Rutherford MJ, Abel GA, Greenberg DC, Lambert PC, Lyratzopoulos G - Br. J. Cancer (2015)

Bottom Line: We projected findings to the English population using appropriate age and socioeconomic group weights.Under assumptions, we estimate that the respective number for England would be 280 deaths (5.0% of all deaths within 5 years post diagnosis in this population).The findings support ongoing development of targeted campaigns aimed at encouraging prompt presentation in older women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Older women with breast cancer have poorer relative survival outcomes, but whether achieving earlier stage at diagnosis would translate to substantial reductions in mortality is uncertain.

Methods: We analysed data on East of England women with breast cancer (2006-2010) aged 70+ years. We estimated survival for different stage-deprivation-age group strata using both the observed and a hypothetical stage distribution (assuming that all women aged 75+ years acquired the stage distribution of those aged 70-74 years). We subsequently estimated deaths that could be postponed beyond 5 years from diagnosis if women aged 75+ years had the hypothetical stage distribution. We projected findings to the English population using appropriate age and socioeconomic group weights.

Results: For a typically sized annual cohort in the East of England, 27 deaths in women with breast cancer aged 75+ years can be postponed within 5 years from diagnosis if their stage distribution matched that of the women aged 70-74 years (4.8% of all 566 deaths within 5 years post diagnosis in this population). Under assumptions, we estimate that the respective number for England would be 280 deaths (5.0% of all deaths within 5 years post diagnosis in this population).

Conclusions: The findings support ongoing development of targeted campaigns aimed at encouraging prompt presentation in older women.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Stage-specific survival across the age groups 70–74, 75–79, 80–84 and 85+ years.
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fig1: Stage-specific survival across the age groups 70–74, 75–79, 80–84 and 85+ years.

Mentions: Stage-specific survival is markedly different for stage I compared with stages III or IV, across age groups (Figure 1). Therefore, if the distribution of stage at diagnosis for the older women matched that of those aged 70–74 years, there should be measurable improvements in survival, translating to a number of all-cause deaths that could be postponed.


The impact of eliminating age inequalities in stage at diagnosis on breast cancer survival for older women.

Rutherford MJ, Abel GA, Greenberg DC, Lambert PC, Lyratzopoulos G - Br. J. Cancer (2015)

Stage-specific survival across the age groups 70–74, 75–79, 80–84 and 85+ years.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4385985&req=5

fig1: Stage-specific survival across the age groups 70–74, 75–79, 80–84 and 85+ years.
Mentions: Stage-specific survival is markedly different for stage I compared with stages III or IV, across age groups (Figure 1). Therefore, if the distribution of stage at diagnosis for the older women matched that of those aged 70–74 years, there should be measurable improvements in survival, translating to a number of all-cause deaths that could be postponed.

Bottom Line: We projected findings to the English population using appropriate age and socioeconomic group weights.Under assumptions, we estimate that the respective number for England would be 280 deaths (5.0% of all deaths within 5 years post diagnosis in this population).The findings support ongoing development of targeted campaigns aimed at encouraging prompt presentation in older women.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH UK.

ABSTRACT

Background: Older women with breast cancer have poorer relative survival outcomes, but whether achieving earlier stage at diagnosis would translate to substantial reductions in mortality is uncertain.

Methods: We analysed data on East of England women with breast cancer (2006-2010) aged 70+ years. We estimated survival for different stage-deprivation-age group strata using both the observed and a hypothetical stage distribution (assuming that all women aged 75+ years acquired the stage distribution of those aged 70-74 years). We subsequently estimated deaths that could be postponed beyond 5 years from diagnosis if women aged 75+ years had the hypothetical stage distribution. We projected findings to the English population using appropriate age and socioeconomic group weights.

Results: For a typically sized annual cohort in the East of England, 27 deaths in women with breast cancer aged 75+ years can be postponed within 5 years from diagnosis if their stage distribution matched that of the women aged 70-74 years (4.8% of all 566 deaths within 5 years post diagnosis in this population). Under assumptions, we estimate that the respective number for England would be 280 deaths (5.0% of all deaths within 5 years post diagnosis in this population).

Conclusions: The findings support ongoing development of targeted campaigns aimed at encouraging prompt presentation in older women.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus