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Understanding the dynamic interactions driving Zambian health centre performance: a case-based health systems analysis.

Topp SM, Chipukuma JM, Hanefeld J - Health Policy Plan (2014)

Bottom Line: Despite being central to achieving improved population health outcomes, primary health centres in low- and middle-income settings continue to underperform.Weak health information systems and lack of performance data undermined providers' answerability to their employer and clients, and a lack of effective sanctions undermined supervisors' ability to hold providers accountable for these transgressions.Health centre performance is influenced by mechanisms of accountability, which are in turn shaped by dynamic interactions between system hardware and system software.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Systems Adviser & Research Associate, Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia (CIDRZ), Schools of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Nossal Institute for Global Health, University of Melbourne, Student, University of Lusaka, Zambia Lecturer in Health Systems Economics, Department of Global Health and Development, Faculty of Public Health and Policy London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine globalstopp@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


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Typical reporting structure in a Zambian primary health centre.
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czu029-F2: Typical reporting structure in a Zambian primary health centre.

Mentions: Primary health centres make up the majority (79%) of Zambia’s health facilities with approximately 29% located in in urban areas. Officially, urban health centres serve a catchment population of 30 000 to 50 000, while rural health centres serve a population of up to 10 000 MOH, GRZ (2007). Depending on location and resourcing, urban and rural health centres may include any combination of an outpatient department (OPD), inpatient department (IPD), maternal and child health department (MCH), labour ward, tuberculosis treatment department (TB corner), HIV care and treatment department (HIV department), laboratory and environmental health team (EHT). The administrative structure of a typical health centre is outlined in Figure 2.Figure 2


Understanding the dynamic interactions driving Zambian health centre performance: a case-based health systems analysis.

Topp SM, Chipukuma JM, Hanefeld J - Health Policy Plan (2014)

Typical reporting structure in a Zambian primary health centre.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4385821&req=5

czu029-F2: Typical reporting structure in a Zambian primary health centre.
Mentions: Primary health centres make up the majority (79%) of Zambia’s health facilities with approximately 29% located in in urban areas. Officially, urban health centres serve a catchment population of 30 000 to 50 000, while rural health centres serve a population of up to 10 000 MOH, GRZ (2007). Depending on location and resourcing, urban and rural health centres may include any combination of an outpatient department (OPD), inpatient department (IPD), maternal and child health department (MCH), labour ward, tuberculosis treatment department (TB corner), HIV care and treatment department (HIV department), laboratory and environmental health team (EHT). The administrative structure of a typical health centre is outlined in Figure 2.Figure 2

Bottom Line: Despite being central to achieving improved population health outcomes, primary health centres in low- and middle-income settings continue to underperform.Weak health information systems and lack of performance data undermined providers' answerability to their employer and clients, and a lack of effective sanctions undermined supervisors' ability to hold providers accountable for these transgressions.Health centre performance is influenced by mechanisms of accountability, which are in turn shaped by dynamic interactions between system hardware and system software.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Health Systems Adviser & Research Associate, Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia (CIDRZ), Schools of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB), Nossal Institute for Global Health, University of Melbourne, Student, University of Lusaka, Zambia Lecturer in Health Systems Economics, Department of Global Health and Development, Faculty of Public Health and Policy London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine globalstopp@gmail.com.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus