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Sjögren's Syndrome: A Case Study.

Jadhav S, Jadhav A, Thopte S, Marathe S, Vhathakar P, Chivte P, Jamkhande A - J Int Oral Health (2015)

Bottom Line: It may occur in two forms - Primary and secondary, which is associated with another autoimmune disease, most commonly rheumatoid arthritis.The classification requires four of the six items, one of which must be positive minor salivary gland biopsy or a positive antibody test.Early diagnosis is important to prevent further complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Assistant Professor, Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed University Dental College & Hospital, Pune, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
Sjögren syndrome is chronic, systemic autoimmune disease characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands. It is an elaborate involvement of the lacrimal and salivary glands, which eventually lead to keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia. It may occur in two forms - Primary and secondary, which is associated with another autoimmune disease, most commonly rheumatoid arthritis. Numerous criteria were proposed for diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome. Most widely accepted are American and European group developed international classification criteria for Sjögrens syndrome. These criteria include ocular symptoms, oral symptoms, ocular signs, histopathology, salivary gland involvement and sialography. The classification requires four of the six items, one of which must be positive minor salivary gland biopsy or a positive antibody test. Early diagnosis is important to prevent further complications. The aim of this paper is to emphasis on oral changes, advanced diagnosis, and management of Sjögren's syndrome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pus discharge through the parotid duct.
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Figure 4: Pus discharge through the parotid duct.

Mentions: Intra-oral examination showed upper and lower well-formed edentulous alveolar ridges. Diffuse black pigmentation present on right and left buccal mucosa and palatal mucosa. Depapilation was present on the anterior 2/3rd and lateral border of the tongue (Figure 3). Buccal mucosa was thin and friable. After milking of the left side of the parotid gland pus discharge was coming through parotid duct (Figure 4).


Sjögren's Syndrome: A Case Study.

Jadhav S, Jadhav A, Thopte S, Marathe S, Vhathakar P, Chivte P, Jamkhande A - J Int Oral Health (2015)

Pus discharge through the parotid duct.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4385732&req=5

Figure 4: Pus discharge through the parotid duct.
Mentions: Intra-oral examination showed upper and lower well-formed edentulous alveolar ridges. Diffuse black pigmentation present on right and left buccal mucosa and palatal mucosa. Depapilation was present on the anterior 2/3rd and lateral border of the tongue (Figure 3). Buccal mucosa was thin and friable. After milking of the left side of the parotid gland pus discharge was coming through parotid duct (Figure 4).

Bottom Line: It may occur in two forms - Primary and secondary, which is associated with another autoimmune disease, most commonly rheumatoid arthritis.The classification requires four of the six items, one of which must be positive minor salivary gland biopsy or a positive antibody test.Early diagnosis is important to prevent further complications.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Assistant Professor, Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Bharati Vidyapeeth Deemed University Dental College & Hospital, Pune, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
Sjögren syndrome is chronic, systemic autoimmune disease characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the exocrine glands. It is an elaborate involvement of the lacrimal and salivary glands, which eventually lead to keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia. It may occur in two forms - Primary and secondary, which is associated with another autoimmune disease, most commonly rheumatoid arthritis. Numerous criteria were proposed for diagnosis of Sjögren syndrome. Most widely accepted are American and European group developed international classification criteria for Sjögrens syndrome. These criteria include ocular symptoms, oral symptoms, ocular signs, histopathology, salivary gland involvement and sialography. The classification requires four of the six items, one of which must be positive minor salivary gland biopsy or a positive antibody test. Early diagnosis is important to prevent further complications. The aim of this paper is to emphasis on oral changes, advanced diagnosis, and management of Sjögren's syndrome.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus