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Oral manifestations of plummer-vinson syndrome: a classic report with literature review.

Samad A, Mohan N, Balaji RV, Augustine D, Patil SG - J Int Oral Health (2015)

Bottom Line: It is one of the syndromes associated with iron deficiency anemia.PVS carries an increased risk of development of squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus and pharynx.The article carries a message that dental surgeons have to be familiar with the oral manifestations of anemia and be able to suspect PVS to aid in early diagnosis and prompt treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Assistant Professor, Department of Oral Medicine & Radiology, Vivekananda Dental College for Women, Tiruchengode, Namakkal, Tamil Nadu, India.

ABSTRACT
Plummer-Vinson syndrome (PVS) is a triad of microcytic hypochromic anemia, atrophic glossitis, and esophageal webs or strictures. It is one of the syndromes associated with iron deficiency anemia. Symptoms resulting from anemia predominates the clinical picture, apart from the additional features such as glossitis, angular cheilitis, and dysphagia. Dysphagia is main clinical feature of PVS. PVS carries an increased risk of development of squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus and pharynx. A classic case report of PVS with clinical features, oral manifestations, malignant potential, differential diagnosis, investigation, dental implication, and treatment is discussed here with the literature review from the dentist's point of view. The article carries a message that dental surgeons have to be familiar with the oral manifestations of anemia and be able to suspect PVS to aid in early diagnosis and prompt treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Barium swallow – lateral view. (b) Barium swallow showing esophageal web.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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Figure 4: (a) Barium swallow – lateral view. (b) Barium swallow showing esophageal web.

Mentions: Radiograph examination consisted of barium swallow test which revealed the constriction of esophagus (Figure 4a). Endoscopy confirmed the presence of esophageal web (post cricoids web 17-18 cm) and also a ruptured web (Figure 4b). The instrument did not pass through at the level of the web. On correlating the clinical history, examination and investigations performed a final diagnosis of PVS was concluded.


Oral manifestations of plummer-vinson syndrome: a classic report with literature review.

Samad A, Mohan N, Balaji RV, Augustine D, Patil SG - J Int Oral Health (2015)

(a) Barium swallow – lateral view. (b) Barium swallow showing esophageal web.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4385731&req=5

Figure 4: (a) Barium swallow – lateral view. (b) Barium swallow showing esophageal web.
Mentions: Radiograph examination consisted of barium swallow test which revealed the constriction of esophagus (Figure 4a). Endoscopy confirmed the presence of esophageal web (post cricoids web 17-18 cm) and also a ruptured web (Figure 4b). The instrument did not pass through at the level of the web. On correlating the clinical history, examination and investigations performed a final diagnosis of PVS was concluded.

Bottom Line: It is one of the syndromes associated with iron deficiency anemia.PVS carries an increased risk of development of squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus and pharynx.The article carries a message that dental surgeons have to be familiar with the oral manifestations of anemia and be able to suspect PVS to aid in early diagnosis and prompt treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Assistant Professor, Department of Oral Medicine & Radiology, Vivekananda Dental College for Women, Tiruchengode, Namakkal, Tamil Nadu, India.

ABSTRACT
Plummer-Vinson syndrome (PVS) is a triad of microcytic hypochromic anemia, atrophic glossitis, and esophageal webs or strictures. It is one of the syndromes associated with iron deficiency anemia. Symptoms resulting from anemia predominates the clinical picture, apart from the additional features such as glossitis, angular cheilitis, and dysphagia. Dysphagia is main clinical feature of PVS. PVS carries an increased risk of development of squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus and pharynx. A classic case report of PVS with clinical features, oral manifestations, malignant potential, differential diagnosis, investigation, dental implication, and treatment is discussed here with the literature review from the dentist's point of view. The article carries a message that dental surgeons have to be familiar with the oral manifestations of anemia and be able to suspect PVS to aid in early diagnosis and prompt treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus