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Theragnostic imaging using radiolabeled antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

Yoshimoto M, Kurihara H, Fujii H - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Bottom Line: However, clinical use of these new drugs presents unexpected adverse effects or poor therapeutic effects.Although immunohistochemical, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses of biopsy samples are conventional and popular for this diagnostic purpose, molecular imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are also useful for noninvasive estimation of gene and protein expression and drug pharmacokinetics.In this review, we introduce new radiolabeled TKIs, antibodies, and their clinical application in molecular targeted therapy and discuss the issues of these imaging probes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Functional Imaging, National Cancer Center Hospital East, 6-5-1, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8577, Japan.

ABSTRACT
During the past decade, the efficacy of new molecular targeted drugs such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and monoclonal antibodies has been proven worldwide, and molecular targeted therapies have become the mainstream in cancer therapy. However, clinical use of these new drugs presents unexpected adverse effects or poor therapeutic effects. Therefore, we require diagnostic tools to estimate the target molecule status in cancer tissues and predict therapeutic efficacy and adverse effects. Although immunohistochemical, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses of biopsy samples are conventional and popular for this diagnostic purpose, molecular imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are also useful for noninvasive estimation of gene and protein expression and drug pharmacokinetics. In this review, we introduce new radiolabeled TKIs, antibodies, and their clinical application in molecular targeted therapy and discuss the issues of these imaging probes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Chemical structures of the EGFR-TK imaging probes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Chemical structures of the EGFR-TK imaging probes.

Mentions: Theragnostic imaging by using radiolabeled molecular targeted drugs provides new important insights into drug development and cancer treatment. For instance, theragnostic imaging reveals pharmacokinetics of drugs in individual patients. This allows stratification of the patients who would benefit from the drugs and identification of modified status of target molecules (expression levels and mutation status). Moreover, understanding of the pharmacokinetics is helpful to select candidate drugs in the process of drug development, resulting in reduction of development cost.


Theragnostic imaging using radiolabeled antibodies and tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

Yoshimoto M, Kurihara H, Fujii H - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Chemical structures of the EGFR-TK imaging probes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4385703&req=5

fig1: Chemical structures of the EGFR-TK imaging probes.
Mentions: Theragnostic imaging by using radiolabeled molecular targeted drugs provides new important insights into drug development and cancer treatment. For instance, theragnostic imaging reveals pharmacokinetics of drugs in individual patients. This allows stratification of the patients who would benefit from the drugs and identification of modified status of target molecules (expression levels and mutation status). Moreover, understanding of the pharmacokinetics is helpful to select candidate drugs in the process of drug development, resulting in reduction of development cost.

Bottom Line: However, clinical use of these new drugs presents unexpected adverse effects or poor therapeutic effects.Although immunohistochemical, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses of biopsy samples are conventional and popular for this diagnostic purpose, molecular imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are also useful for noninvasive estimation of gene and protein expression and drug pharmacokinetics.In this review, we introduce new radiolabeled TKIs, antibodies, and their clinical application in molecular targeted therapy and discuss the issues of these imaging probes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Functional Imaging, National Cancer Center Hospital East, 6-5-1, Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8577, Japan.

ABSTRACT
During the past decade, the efficacy of new molecular targeted drugs such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and monoclonal antibodies has been proven worldwide, and molecular targeted therapies have become the mainstream in cancer therapy. However, clinical use of these new drugs presents unexpected adverse effects or poor therapeutic effects. Therefore, we require diagnostic tools to estimate the target molecule status in cancer tissues and predict therapeutic efficacy and adverse effects. Although immunohistochemical, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses of biopsy samples are conventional and popular for this diagnostic purpose, molecular imaging modalities such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are also useful for noninvasive estimation of gene and protein expression and drug pharmacokinetics. In this review, we introduce new radiolabeled TKIs, antibodies, and their clinical application in molecular targeted therapy and discuss the issues of these imaging probes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus