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Excessive daytime sleepiness is associated with changes in salivary inflammatory genes transcripts.

Thimgan MS, Toedebusch C, McLeland J, Duntley SP, Shaw PJ - Mediators Inflamm. (2015)

Bottom Line: In this study, salivary samples from individuals with sleep apnea were evaluated using the Taqman low density inflammation array.Transcript levels for 3 genes, including prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), were elevated in patients with sleep apnea.Interestingly, PTGS2 was also elevated in patients with EDS but who did not have sleep apnea.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomy and Physiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA ; Department of Biological Sciences, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 400 W. 11th Street, Rolla, MO 65401, USA.

ABSTRACT
Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is a ubiquitous problem that affects public health and safety. A test that can reliably identify individuals that suffer from EDS is needed. In contrast to other methods, salivary biomarkers are an objective, inexpensive, and noninvasive method to identify individuals with inadequate sleep. Although we have previously shown that inflammatory genes are elevated in saliva samples taken from sleep deprived individuals, it is unclear if inflammatory genes will be elevated in clinical populations with EDS. In this study, salivary samples from individuals with sleep apnea were evaluated using the Taqman low density inflammation array. Transcript levels for 3 genes, including prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), were elevated in patients with sleep apnea. Interestingly, PTGS2 was also elevated in patients with EDS but who did not have sleep apnea. These data demonstrate the feasibility of using salivary transcript levels to identify individuals that self-report excessive daytime sleepiness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Correlation of transcript levels with BMI. The transcript levels were plotted against the log values of the transcript levels for each of the transcripts that were significant in the sleep apnea or “sleepy” groups. In addition the transcripts with the lowest P value were plotted to determine if there was a significant correlation with increased weight. For each transcript, there was no significant correlation with increased BMI.
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fig1: Correlation of transcript levels with BMI. The transcript levels were plotted against the log values of the transcript levels for each of the transcripts that were significant in the sleep apnea or “sleepy” groups. In addition the transcripts with the lowest P value were plotted to determine if there was a significant correlation with increased weight. For each transcript, there was no significant correlation with increased BMI.

Mentions: One possible explanation for elevated inflammatory transcripts is that both the sleep apnea and “sleepy” patients have a significantly higher BMI compared to controls. If the observed relationship is due solely to BMI, then patients with high BMI should have increased levels of inflammatory transcripts compared to patients with lower BMI. Similarly, we should detect a significant positive correlation between BMI and the level of salivary transcripts. To test this hypothesis we discretized the data by placing the subjects with a low BMI (≤30; n = 24) into a single group and comparing them to subjects with a high BMI (>38; n = 16). As seen in Table 5, transcripts were not significantly different between subjects in the lower BMI group compared to their counterparts with a higher BMI. In addition, we evaluated the relationship between BMI and transcript levels using a Pearson correlation and found no significant correlations. Examples of transcript expression levels for the genes with the lowest P values are plotted in Figure 1 as a function of BMI. These data indicate that, in this dataset, BMI does not account for increases in transcript levels in these patients.


Excessive daytime sleepiness is associated with changes in salivary inflammatory genes transcripts.

Thimgan MS, Toedebusch C, McLeland J, Duntley SP, Shaw PJ - Mediators Inflamm. (2015)

Correlation of transcript levels with BMI. The transcript levels were plotted against the log values of the transcript levels for each of the transcripts that were significant in the sleep apnea or “sleepy” groups. In addition the transcripts with the lowest P value were plotted to determine if there was a significant correlation with increased weight. For each transcript, there was no significant correlation with increased BMI.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4385694&req=5

fig1: Correlation of transcript levels with BMI. The transcript levels were plotted against the log values of the transcript levels for each of the transcripts that were significant in the sleep apnea or “sleepy” groups. In addition the transcripts with the lowest P value were plotted to determine if there was a significant correlation with increased weight. For each transcript, there was no significant correlation with increased BMI.
Mentions: One possible explanation for elevated inflammatory transcripts is that both the sleep apnea and “sleepy” patients have a significantly higher BMI compared to controls. If the observed relationship is due solely to BMI, then patients with high BMI should have increased levels of inflammatory transcripts compared to patients with lower BMI. Similarly, we should detect a significant positive correlation between BMI and the level of salivary transcripts. To test this hypothesis we discretized the data by placing the subjects with a low BMI (≤30; n = 24) into a single group and comparing them to subjects with a high BMI (>38; n = 16). As seen in Table 5, transcripts were not significantly different between subjects in the lower BMI group compared to their counterparts with a higher BMI. In addition, we evaluated the relationship between BMI and transcript levels using a Pearson correlation and found no significant correlations. Examples of transcript expression levels for the genes with the lowest P values are plotted in Figure 1 as a function of BMI. These data indicate that, in this dataset, BMI does not account for increases in transcript levels in these patients.

Bottom Line: In this study, salivary samples from individuals with sleep apnea were evaluated using the Taqman low density inflammation array.Transcript levels for 3 genes, including prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), were elevated in patients with sleep apnea.Interestingly, PTGS2 was also elevated in patients with EDS but who did not have sleep apnea.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anatomy and Physiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110, USA ; Department of Biological Sciences, Missouri University of Science and Technology, 400 W. 11th Street, Rolla, MO 65401, USA.

ABSTRACT
Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) is a ubiquitous problem that affects public health and safety. A test that can reliably identify individuals that suffer from EDS is needed. In contrast to other methods, salivary biomarkers are an objective, inexpensive, and noninvasive method to identify individuals with inadequate sleep. Although we have previously shown that inflammatory genes are elevated in saliva samples taken from sleep deprived individuals, it is unclear if inflammatory genes will be elevated in clinical populations with EDS. In this study, salivary samples from individuals with sleep apnea were evaluated using the Taqman low density inflammation array. Transcript levels for 3 genes, including prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2), were elevated in patients with sleep apnea. Interestingly, PTGS2 was also elevated in patients with EDS but who did not have sleep apnea. These data demonstrate the feasibility of using salivary transcript levels to identify individuals that self-report excessive daytime sleepiness.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus