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Accurate simulation of MPPT methods performance when applied to commercial photovoltaic panels.

Cubas J, Pindado S, Sanz-Andrés Á - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Bottom Line: A new, simple, and quick-calculation methodology to obtain a solar panel model, based on the manufacturers' datasheet, to perform MPPT simulations, is described.The method takes into account variations on the ambient conditions (sun irradiation and solar cells temperature) and allows fast MPPT methods comparison or their performance prediction when applied to a particular solar panel.The feasibility of the described methodology is checked with four different MPPT methods applied to a commercial solar panel, within a day, and under realistic ambient conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ETSI Aeronáuticos, Instituto Universitario de Microgravedad "Ignacio Da Riva" (IDR/UPM), Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Plaza del Cardenal Cisneros 3, 28040 Madrid, Spain.

ABSTRACT
A new, simple, and quick-calculation methodology to obtain a solar panel model, based on the manufacturers' datasheet, to perform MPPT simulations, is described. The method takes into account variations on the ambient conditions (sun irradiation and solar cells temperature) and allows fast MPPT methods comparison or their performance prediction when applied to a particular solar panel. The feasibility of the described methodology is checked with four different MPPT methods applied to a commercial solar panel, within a day, and under realistic ambient conditions.

No MeSH data available.


Power from an 8-panel photovoltaic facility calculated with the proposed methodology and P&O MPPT algorithm (scaled results and results with power losses considered). The results from the testing measurements [50] (considering P&O and INC MPPT algorithms) are also included in the figure (P&O: blue line; INC: red line).
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fig15: Power from an 8-panel photovoltaic facility calculated with the proposed methodology and P&O MPPT algorithm (scaled results and results with power losses considered). The results from the testing measurements [50] (considering P&O and INC MPPT algorithms) are also included in the figure (P&O: blue line; INC: red line).

Mentions: The procedure described in Section 4 was followed in order to model the studied photovoltaic facility. The extracted power was calculated using the perturb and observe (P&O) MPPT algorithm. This power was compared to the measured one from the facility [50], which was programmed following two different MPPT algorithms, perturb and observe (P&O) and incremental conductance (INC). The results from the simulation show a higher extracted power when compared to the behavior measured directly on the facility, this discrepancy between results being explained as no power losses (wiring, connections, dirt over the panels, degradation, losses at the Boost-converter, etc.) were taken into account in the simulation carried out. Bearing in mind that no information regarding these losses was included in [50], the results were scaled down by multiplying by a constant (0.64) and, as a result, a much better correlation was obtained (see Figure 15). Also, an equivalent resistor can be then considered in order to take into account the power losses. The results corresponding to the simulation carried out with a 1.375 Ω resistor connected in series with each pair of solar panels are included in Figure 15. A quite good correlation between the results obtained with the present methodology and the ones measured by Houssamo et al. [50] can be observed in the figure. To obtain a better approximation to the measured results, a combination of the scaled results (losses proportional to the extracted power like the ones produced by dirt in the panels) and the losses resulting from electrical current (taken into account with equivalent resistors) should be considered. This result has been included in Figure 15 combining both kinds of power losses at 50% each one. An excellent correlation with the measured extracted power can be observed, the higher deviation being located where the effect of the MPPT algorithm selection is relevant. The highest differences in extracted power between both MPPT algorithms selected by the authors of [50] were measured in period from 20 s to 25 s, which is precisely the period where the higher deviation of the results obtained by present methodology from the measurement results is observed.


Accurate simulation of MPPT methods performance when applied to commercial photovoltaic panels.

Cubas J, Pindado S, Sanz-Andrés Á - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Power from an 8-panel photovoltaic facility calculated with the proposed methodology and P&O MPPT algorithm (scaled results and results with power losses considered). The results from the testing measurements [50] (considering P&O and INC MPPT algorithms) are also included in the figure (P&O: blue line; INC: red line).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4385678&req=5

fig15: Power from an 8-panel photovoltaic facility calculated with the proposed methodology and P&O MPPT algorithm (scaled results and results with power losses considered). The results from the testing measurements [50] (considering P&O and INC MPPT algorithms) are also included in the figure (P&O: blue line; INC: red line).
Mentions: The procedure described in Section 4 was followed in order to model the studied photovoltaic facility. The extracted power was calculated using the perturb and observe (P&O) MPPT algorithm. This power was compared to the measured one from the facility [50], which was programmed following two different MPPT algorithms, perturb and observe (P&O) and incremental conductance (INC). The results from the simulation show a higher extracted power when compared to the behavior measured directly on the facility, this discrepancy between results being explained as no power losses (wiring, connections, dirt over the panels, degradation, losses at the Boost-converter, etc.) were taken into account in the simulation carried out. Bearing in mind that no information regarding these losses was included in [50], the results were scaled down by multiplying by a constant (0.64) and, as a result, a much better correlation was obtained (see Figure 15). Also, an equivalent resistor can be then considered in order to take into account the power losses. The results corresponding to the simulation carried out with a 1.375 Ω resistor connected in series with each pair of solar panels are included in Figure 15. A quite good correlation between the results obtained with the present methodology and the ones measured by Houssamo et al. [50] can be observed in the figure. To obtain a better approximation to the measured results, a combination of the scaled results (losses proportional to the extracted power like the ones produced by dirt in the panels) and the losses resulting from electrical current (taken into account with equivalent resistors) should be considered. This result has been included in Figure 15 combining both kinds of power losses at 50% each one. An excellent correlation with the measured extracted power can be observed, the higher deviation being located where the effect of the MPPT algorithm selection is relevant. The highest differences in extracted power between both MPPT algorithms selected by the authors of [50] were measured in period from 20 s to 25 s, which is precisely the period where the higher deviation of the results obtained by present methodology from the measurement results is observed.

Bottom Line: A new, simple, and quick-calculation methodology to obtain a solar panel model, based on the manufacturers' datasheet, to perform MPPT simulations, is described.The method takes into account variations on the ambient conditions (sun irradiation and solar cells temperature) and allows fast MPPT methods comparison or their performance prediction when applied to a particular solar panel.The feasibility of the described methodology is checked with four different MPPT methods applied to a commercial solar panel, within a day, and under realistic ambient conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: ETSI Aeronáuticos, Instituto Universitario de Microgravedad "Ignacio Da Riva" (IDR/UPM), Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Plaza del Cardenal Cisneros 3, 28040 Madrid, Spain.

ABSTRACT
A new, simple, and quick-calculation methodology to obtain a solar panel model, based on the manufacturers' datasheet, to perform MPPT simulations, is described. The method takes into account variations on the ambient conditions (sun irradiation and solar cells temperature) and allows fast MPPT methods comparison or their performance prediction when applied to a particular solar panel. The feasibility of the described methodology is checked with four different MPPT methods applied to a commercial solar panel, within a day, and under realistic ambient conditions.

No MeSH data available.