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Evaluation of the esthetic properties of developmental defects of enamel: a spectrophotometric clinical study.

Guerra F, Mazur M, Corridore D, Pasqualotto D, Nardi GM, Ottolenghi L - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Bottom Line: Several clinical indices have been developed to categorize enamel defects based on their nature, appearance, microscopic features, or cause.The spectrophotometric approach quantifies L* (luminosity), a* (quantity of green-red), and b* (quantity of blue-yellow) of different DDE.SpectroShade evaluation of the optical properties of the enamel defect enhances clinical understanding of severity and extent of the defect and characterizes the enamel alteration in terms of color discrepancy and surface characterization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillo-Facial Sciences, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Via Caserta 6, 00161 Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Detailed clinical quantification of optical properties of developmental defect of enamel is possible with spectrophotometric evaluation. Developmental defects of enamel (DDE) are daily encountered in clinical practice. DDE are an alteration in quality and quantity of the enamel, caused by disruption and/or damage to the enamel organ during amelogenesis.

Methods: Several clinical indices have been developed to categorize enamel defects based on their nature, appearance, microscopic features, or cause. A sample of 39 permanent teeth presenting DDE on labial surface was examined using the DDE Modified Index and SpectroShade evaluation. The spectrophotometric approach quantifies L* (luminosity), a* (quantity of green-red), and b* (quantity of blue-yellow) of different DDE.

Conclusions: SpectroShade evaluation of the optical properties of the enamel defect enhances clinical understanding of severity and extent of the defect and characterizes the enamel alteration in terms of color discrepancy and surface characterization.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Example of L*a*b* measurements of hypoplastic defects on upper central incisor: (a) polarized image; (b) gloss mode allowing the identification of “pure enamel zones”; (c) contrast image; (d) evaluation of the three equal zones along the median axis: gingival, central, and incisal; (e) colour distribution and detailed mapping of the defect surface; (f) overall detailed mapping; (g) translucency.
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fig4: Example of L*a*b* measurements of hypoplastic defects on upper central incisor: (a) polarized image; (b) gloss mode allowing the identification of “pure enamel zones”; (c) contrast image; (d) evaluation of the three equal zones along the median axis: gingival, central, and incisal; (e) colour distribution and detailed mapping of the defect surface; (f) overall detailed mapping; (g) translucency.

Mentions: The Modified DDE Index [7] is a descriptive index derived from the Developmental Defects of Enamel Index [8]. It is more practical and comparable index for epidemiological studies and it allows efficient recording of prevalence and severity of enamel defects. The criteria for classification are related with histopathological changes [9]. The DDE Modified Index divides defects into three types: demarcated (Figures 1, 2, and 3), diffuse (Figure 5), and hypoplastic (Figure 4). The diffuse opacity category probably contains most of the fluoride-related opacities. However, this group contains some nonfluoride opacities as well, and no attempt is made to differentiate between these types. The extent of the defect should be recorded in thirds of the tooth surface area and a limit in size of greater than 1 mm in diameter should be used to distinguish between normal and abnormal enamel defects (Table 1).


Evaluation of the esthetic properties of developmental defects of enamel: a spectrophotometric clinical study.

Guerra F, Mazur M, Corridore D, Pasqualotto D, Nardi GM, Ottolenghi L - ScientificWorldJournal (2015)

Example of L*a*b* measurements of hypoplastic defects on upper central incisor: (a) polarized image; (b) gloss mode allowing the identification of “pure enamel zones”; (c) contrast image; (d) evaluation of the three equal zones along the median axis: gingival, central, and incisal; (e) colour distribution and detailed mapping of the defect surface; (f) overall detailed mapping; (g) translucency.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4385663&req=5

fig4: Example of L*a*b* measurements of hypoplastic defects on upper central incisor: (a) polarized image; (b) gloss mode allowing the identification of “pure enamel zones”; (c) contrast image; (d) evaluation of the three equal zones along the median axis: gingival, central, and incisal; (e) colour distribution and detailed mapping of the defect surface; (f) overall detailed mapping; (g) translucency.
Mentions: The Modified DDE Index [7] is a descriptive index derived from the Developmental Defects of Enamel Index [8]. It is more practical and comparable index for epidemiological studies and it allows efficient recording of prevalence and severity of enamel defects. The criteria for classification are related with histopathological changes [9]. The DDE Modified Index divides defects into three types: demarcated (Figures 1, 2, and 3), diffuse (Figure 5), and hypoplastic (Figure 4). The diffuse opacity category probably contains most of the fluoride-related opacities. However, this group contains some nonfluoride opacities as well, and no attempt is made to differentiate between these types. The extent of the defect should be recorded in thirds of the tooth surface area and a limit in size of greater than 1 mm in diameter should be used to distinguish between normal and abnormal enamel defects (Table 1).

Bottom Line: Several clinical indices have been developed to categorize enamel defects based on their nature, appearance, microscopic features, or cause.The spectrophotometric approach quantifies L* (luminosity), a* (quantity of green-red), and b* (quantity of blue-yellow) of different DDE.SpectroShade evaluation of the optical properties of the enamel defect enhances clinical understanding of severity and extent of the defect and characterizes the enamel alteration in terms of color discrepancy and surface characterization.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillo-Facial Sciences, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Via Caserta 6, 00161 Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: Detailed clinical quantification of optical properties of developmental defect of enamel is possible with spectrophotometric evaluation. Developmental defects of enamel (DDE) are daily encountered in clinical practice. DDE are an alteration in quality and quantity of the enamel, caused by disruption and/or damage to the enamel organ during amelogenesis.

Methods: Several clinical indices have been developed to categorize enamel defects based on their nature, appearance, microscopic features, or cause. A sample of 39 permanent teeth presenting DDE on labial surface was examined using the DDE Modified Index and SpectroShade evaluation. The spectrophotometric approach quantifies L* (luminosity), a* (quantity of green-red), and b* (quantity of blue-yellow) of different DDE.

Conclusions: SpectroShade evaluation of the optical properties of the enamel defect enhances clinical understanding of severity and extent of the defect and characterizes the enamel alteration in terms of color discrepancy and surface characterization.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus