Limits...
Sex differences in cardiovascular mortality in diabetics and nondiabetic subjects: a population-based study (Italy).

Ballotari P, Ranieri SC, Luberto F, Caroli S, Greci M, Giorgi Rossi P, Manicardi V - Int J Endocrinol (2015)

Bottom Line: The inhabitants of Reggio Emilia province on December 31, 2009, aged 20-84 were followed up for three years for mortality.The age-adjusted death rates were estimated as well as the incidence rate ratios using Poisson regression model.People with diabetes had an excess of mortality, compared with nondiabetic subjects (all cause: IRR = 1.68; 95%CI 1.60-1.78; CVD: IRR = 1.61; 95%CI 1.47-1.76; AMI: IRR = 1.59; 95%CI 1.27-1.99; renal causes: IRR = 1.71; 95%CI 1.22-2.38).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Servizio Interaziendale di Epidemiologia, Azienda Unità Sanitaria Locale, Via Amendola 2, 42122 Reggio Emilia, Italy ; IRCCS Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Viale Umberto I 50, 42123 Reggio Emilia, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The objective of this study is to assess the impact of diabetes on cardiovascular mortality, focusing on sex differences. The inhabitants of Reggio Emilia province on December 31, 2009, aged 20-84 were followed up for three years for mortality. The exposure was determined using Reggio Emilia diabetes register. The age-adjusted death rates were estimated as well as the incidence rate ratios using Poisson regression model. Interaction terms for diabetes and sex were tested by the Wald test. People with diabetes had an excess of mortality, compared with nondiabetic subjects (all cause: IRR = 1.68; 95%CI 1.60-1.78; CVD: IRR = 1.61; 95%CI 1.47-1.76; AMI: IRR = 1.59; 95%CI 1.27-1.99; renal causes: IRR = 1.71; 95%CI 1.22-2.38). The impact of diabetes is greater in females than males for all causes (P = 0.0321) and for CVD, IMA, and renal causes. Further studies are needed to investigate whether the difference in cardiovascular risk profile or in the quality of care delivered justifies the higher excess of mortality in females with diabetes compared to males.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Age-specific death rates by sex and diabetes status: (a) all cause of death; (b) CVD; (c) AMI; (d) renal causes. The curves with dash indicate diabetic patients and the curve with squares indicate males and the curve with triangles indicate females.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4385659&req=5

fig1: Age-specific death rates by sex and diabetes status: (a) all cause of death; (b) CVD; (c) AMI; (d) renal causes. The curves with dash indicate diabetic patients and the curve with squares indicate males and the curve with triangles indicate females.

Mentions: Comparison among age-specific death rates by sex and diabetes status (Figure 1) indicated that males with diabetes have the highest rates. However, females with diabetes have higher rates than males without diabetes mainly in the younger age groups, while females without diabetes have very low death rates until the age of 64.


Sex differences in cardiovascular mortality in diabetics and nondiabetic subjects: a population-based study (Italy).

Ballotari P, Ranieri SC, Luberto F, Caroli S, Greci M, Giorgi Rossi P, Manicardi V - Int J Endocrinol (2015)

Age-specific death rates by sex and diabetes status: (a) all cause of death; (b) CVD; (c) AMI; (d) renal causes. The curves with dash indicate diabetic patients and the curve with squares indicate males and the curve with triangles indicate females.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4385659&req=5

fig1: Age-specific death rates by sex and diabetes status: (a) all cause of death; (b) CVD; (c) AMI; (d) renal causes. The curves with dash indicate diabetic patients and the curve with squares indicate males and the curve with triangles indicate females.
Mentions: Comparison among age-specific death rates by sex and diabetes status (Figure 1) indicated that males with diabetes have the highest rates. However, females with diabetes have higher rates than males without diabetes mainly in the younger age groups, while females without diabetes have very low death rates until the age of 64.

Bottom Line: The inhabitants of Reggio Emilia province on December 31, 2009, aged 20-84 were followed up for three years for mortality.The age-adjusted death rates were estimated as well as the incidence rate ratios using Poisson regression model.People with diabetes had an excess of mortality, compared with nondiabetic subjects (all cause: IRR = 1.68; 95%CI 1.60-1.78; CVD: IRR = 1.61; 95%CI 1.47-1.76; AMI: IRR = 1.59; 95%CI 1.27-1.99; renal causes: IRR = 1.71; 95%CI 1.22-2.38).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Servizio Interaziendale di Epidemiologia, Azienda Unità Sanitaria Locale, Via Amendola 2, 42122 Reggio Emilia, Italy ; IRCCS Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova, Viale Umberto I 50, 42123 Reggio Emilia, Italy.

ABSTRACT
The objective of this study is to assess the impact of diabetes on cardiovascular mortality, focusing on sex differences. The inhabitants of Reggio Emilia province on December 31, 2009, aged 20-84 were followed up for three years for mortality. The exposure was determined using Reggio Emilia diabetes register. The age-adjusted death rates were estimated as well as the incidence rate ratios using Poisson regression model. Interaction terms for diabetes and sex were tested by the Wald test. People with diabetes had an excess of mortality, compared with nondiabetic subjects (all cause: IRR = 1.68; 95%CI 1.60-1.78; CVD: IRR = 1.61; 95%CI 1.47-1.76; AMI: IRR = 1.59; 95%CI 1.27-1.99; renal causes: IRR = 1.71; 95%CI 1.22-2.38). The impact of diabetes is greater in females than males for all causes (P = 0.0321) and for CVD, IMA, and renal causes. Further studies are needed to investigate whether the difference in cardiovascular risk profile or in the quality of care delivered justifies the higher excess of mortality in females with diabetes compared to males.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus