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Recent advances in molecular magnetic resonance imaging of liver fibrosis.

Li Z, Sun J, Yang X - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Bottom Line: However, these techniques only reflect morphological or perfusion-related alterations in the liver, and thus they are generally only useful for the diagnosis of late-stage liver fibrosis (liver cirrhosis), which is already characterized by "irreversible" anatomic and hemodynamic changes.The development of molecular MR imaging technology has potential in this regard, as it facilitates noninvasive, target-specific imaging of liver fibrosis.We provide an overview of recent advances in molecular MR imaging for the diagnosis and staging of liver fibrosis and we compare novel technologies with conventional MR imaging techniques.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310016, China.

ABSTRACT
Liver fibrosis is a life-threatening disease with high morbidity and mortality owing to its diverse causes. Liver biopsy, as the current gold standard for diagnosing and staging liver fibrosis, has a number of limitations, including sample variability, relatively high cost, an invasive nature, and the potential of complications. Most importantly, in clinical practice, patients often reject additional liver biopsies after initiating treatment despite their being necessary for long-term follow-up. To resolve these problems, a number of different noninvasive imaging-based methods have been developed for accurate diagnosis of liver fibrosis. However, these techniques only reflect morphological or perfusion-related alterations in the liver, and thus they are generally only useful for the diagnosis of late-stage liver fibrosis (liver cirrhosis), which is already characterized by "irreversible" anatomic and hemodynamic changes. Thus, it is essential that new approaches are developed for accurately diagnosing early-stage liver fibrosis as at this stage the disease may be "reversed" by active treatment. The development of molecular MR imaging technology has potential in this regard, as it facilitates noninvasive, target-specific imaging of liver fibrosis. We provide an overview of recent advances in molecular MR imaging for the diagnosis and staging of liver fibrosis and we compare novel technologies with conventional MR imaging techniques.

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Key agents involved in the activation of hepatic stellate cells during the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. (Reprinted with permission from [13].)
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fig1: Key agents involved in the activation of hepatic stellate cells during the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. (Reprinted with permission from [13].)

Mentions: Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are mesenchymal cells that are resident in the liver, and they play a crucial role in fibrogenesis (Figure 1) [13]. Activation of HSCs occurs via a complex process that includes signal transmission, gene expression, and receptor expression. Numerous cytokines are involved in fibrogenesis, including platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin [2, 14].


Recent advances in molecular magnetic resonance imaging of liver fibrosis.

Li Z, Sun J, Yang X - Biomed Res Int (2015)

Key agents involved in the activation of hepatic stellate cells during the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. (Reprinted with permission from [13].)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4385649&req=5

fig1: Key agents involved in the activation of hepatic stellate cells during the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis. (Reprinted with permission from [13].)
Mentions: Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are mesenchymal cells that are resident in the liver, and they play a crucial role in fibrogenesis (Figure 1) [13]. Activation of HSCs occurs via a complex process that includes signal transmission, gene expression, and receptor expression. Numerous cytokines are involved in fibrogenesis, including platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin [2, 14].

Bottom Line: However, these techniques only reflect morphological or perfusion-related alterations in the liver, and thus they are generally only useful for the diagnosis of late-stage liver fibrosis (liver cirrhosis), which is already characterized by "irreversible" anatomic and hemodynamic changes.The development of molecular MR imaging technology has potential in this regard, as it facilitates noninvasive, target-specific imaging of liver fibrosis.We provide an overview of recent advances in molecular MR imaging for the diagnosis and staging of liver fibrosis and we compare novel technologies with conventional MR imaging techniques.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Sir Run Run Shaw Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310016, China.

ABSTRACT
Liver fibrosis is a life-threatening disease with high morbidity and mortality owing to its diverse causes. Liver biopsy, as the current gold standard for diagnosing and staging liver fibrosis, has a number of limitations, including sample variability, relatively high cost, an invasive nature, and the potential of complications. Most importantly, in clinical practice, patients often reject additional liver biopsies after initiating treatment despite their being necessary for long-term follow-up. To resolve these problems, a number of different noninvasive imaging-based methods have been developed for accurate diagnosis of liver fibrosis. However, these techniques only reflect morphological or perfusion-related alterations in the liver, and thus they are generally only useful for the diagnosis of late-stage liver fibrosis (liver cirrhosis), which is already characterized by "irreversible" anatomic and hemodynamic changes. Thus, it is essential that new approaches are developed for accurately diagnosing early-stage liver fibrosis as at this stage the disease may be "reversed" by active treatment. The development of molecular MR imaging technology has potential in this regard, as it facilitates noninvasive, target-specific imaging of liver fibrosis. We provide an overview of recent advances in molecular MR imaging for the diagnosis and staging of liver fibrosis and we compare novel technologies with conventional MR imaging techniques.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus