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The association of metabolic syndrome and urolithiasis.

Wong YV, Cook P, Somani BK - Int J Endocrinol (2015)

Bottom Line: Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the pathophysiology of urolithiasis resulting from metabolic syndrome, amongst which are the insulin resistance and Randall's plaque hypothesis.Studies have found many factors contributing to urolithiasis in patients suffering from metabolic syndrome, out of which obesity, overweight, and sedentary lifestyles have been identified as major etiological factors.Primary and secondary prevention methods therefore tend to revolve mainly around lifestyle improvements, including dietary and other preventive measures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, University Hospital Southampton NHS Trust, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK.

ABSTRACT
There has been an increasing prevalence of kidney stones over the last 2 decades worldwide. Many studies have indicated a possible association between metabolic syndrome and kidney stone disease, particularly in overweight and obese patients. Many different definitions of metabolic syndrome have been suggested by various organizations, although the definition by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) is universally considered as the most acceptable definition. The IDF definition revolves around 4 core components: obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the pathophysiology of urolithiasis resulting from metabolic syndrome, amongst which are the insulin resistance and Randall's plaque hypothesis. Similarly the pathophysiology of calcium and uric acid stone formation has been investigated to determine a connection between the two conditions. Studies have found many factors contributing to urolithiasis in patients suffering from metabolic syndrome, out of which obesity, overweight, and sedentary lifestyles have been identified as major etiological factors. Primary and secondary prevention methods therefore tend to revolve mainly around lifestyle improvements, including dietary and other preventive measures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pathophysiology of insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome [56].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Pathophysiology of insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome [56].

Mentions: Free fatty acids (FFA) are released from adipose tissue due to visceral obesity. FFA increase the production of glucose, triglycerides, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), and low density lipoprotein (LDL) and decrease the production of high density lipoprotein (HDL) in the liver, resulting in type II diabetes and dyslipidemia. Furthermore they reduce insulin sensitivity by inhibiting insulin-mediated glucose uptake. The resulting increase of circulating glucose results in inflammation, altered vascular reactivity, and impaired fibrinolysis in tissues (see Figure 1).


The association of metabolic syndrome and urolithiasis.

Wong YV, Cook P, Somani BK - Int J Endocrinol (2015)

Pathophysiology of insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome [56].
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4385647&req=5

fig1: Pathophysiology of insulin resistance in metabolic syndrome [56].
Mentions: Free fatty acids (FFA) are released from adipose tissue due to visceral obesity. FFA increase the production of glucose, triglycerides, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), and low density lipoprotein (LDL) and decrease the production of high density lipoprotein (HDL) in the liver, resulting in type II diabetes and dyslipidemia. Furthermore they reduce insulin sensitivity by inhibiting insulin-mediated glucose uptake. The resulting increase of circulating glucose results in inflammation, altered vascular reactivity, and impaired fibrinolysis in tissues (see Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the pathophysiology of urolithiasis resulting from metabolic syndrome, amongst which are the insulin resistance and Randall's plaque hypothesis.Studies have found many factors contributing to urolithiasis in patients suffering from metabolic syndrome, out of which obesity, overweight, and sedentary lifestyles have been identified as major etiological factors.Primary and secondary prevention methods therefore tend to revolve mainly around lifestyle improvements, including dietary and other preventive measures.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Urology, University Hospital Southampton NHS Trust, Southampton SO16 6YD, UK.

ABSTRACT
There has been an increasing prevalence of kidney stones over the last 2 decades worldwide. Many studies have indicated a possible association between metabolic syndrome and kidney stone disease, particularly in overweight and obese patients. Many different definitions of metabolic syndrome have been suggested by various organizations, although the definition by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) is universally considered as the most acceptable definition. The IDF definition revolves around 4 core components: obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the pathophysiology of urolithiasis resulting from metabolic syndrome, amongst which are the insulin resistance and Randall's plaque hypothesis. Similarly the pathophysiology of calcium and uric acid stone formation has been investigated to determine a connection between the two conditions. Studies have found many factors contributing to urolithiasis in patients suffering from metabolic syndrome, out of which obesity, overweight, and sedentary lifestyles have been identified as major etiological factors. Primary and secondary prevention methods therefore tend to revolve mainly around lifestyle improvements, including dietary and other preventive measures.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus