Limits...
Improved fracture healing in patients with concomitant traumatic brain injury: proven or not?

Hofman M, Koopmans G, Kobbe P, Poeze M, Andruszkow H, Brink PR, Pape HC - Mediators Inflamm. (2015)

Bottom Line: Over the last 3 decades, scientific evidence advocates an association between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and accelerated fracture healing.Until now, the mechanism behind this relationship is not fully clarified and a consensus on which substance plays the key role could not be attained in the literature.In this review, we will give an overview of current concepts and opinions on this topic published in the last decade and both clinical and pathophysiological theories will be discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Trauma, University of Aachen Medical Center, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Over the last 3 decades, scientific evidence advocates an association between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and accelerated fracture healing. Multiple clinical and preclinical studies have shown an enhanced callus formation and an increased callus volume in patients, respectively, rats with concomitant TBI. Over time, different substances (cytokines, hormones, etc.) were in focus to elucidate the relationship between TBI and fracture healing. Until now, the mechanism behind this relationship is not fully clarified and a consensus on which substance plays the key role could not be attained in the literature. In this review, we will give an overview of current concepts and opinions on this topic published in the last decade and both clinical and pathophysiological theories will be discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Indirect fracture healing.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4385630&req=5

fig1: Indirect fracture healing.

Mentions: Fracture healing occurs either by direct intramembranous healing or by indirect intramembranous and endochondral healing. Indirect fracture healing is the most common form and can be subdivided into multiple stages (Figure 1). The first stage, named the inflammation stage, starts with fracture and can last for about 5 days. In this stage, the fracture haematoma organizes and forms a link between the fracture fragments. This haematoma consists of blood cells, mesenchymal stem cells, fibroblasts, osteoclasts, osteoblasts, cytokines, growth factors, and other hormones.


Improved fracture healing in patients with concomitant traumatic brain injury: proven or not?

Hofman M, Koopmans G, Kobbe P, Poeze M, Andruszkow H, Brink PR, Pape HC - Mediators Inflamm. (2015)

Indirect fracture healing.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4385630&req=5

fig1: Indirect fracture healing.
Mentions: Fracture healing occurs either by direct intramembranous healing or by indirect intramembranous and endochondral healing. Indirect fracture healing is the most common form and can be subdivided into multiple stages (Figure 1). The first stage, named the inflammation stage, starts with fracture and can last for about 5 days. In this stage, the fracture haematoma organizes and forms a link between the fracture fragments. This haematoma consists of blood cells, mesenchymal stem cells, fibroblasts, osteoclasts, osteoblasts, cytokines, growth factors, and other hormones.

Bottom Line: Over the last 3 decades, scientific evidence advocates an association between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and accelerated fracture healing.Until now, the mechanism behind this relationship is not fully clarified and a consensus on which substance plays the key role could not be attained in the literature.In this review, we will give an overview of current concepts and opinions on this topic published in the last decade and both clinical and pathophysiological theories will be discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedic Trauma, University of Aachen Medical Center, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Over the last 3 decades, scientific evidence advocates an association between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and accelerated fracture healing. Multiple clinical and preclinical studies have shown an enhanced callus formation and an increased callus volume in patients, respectively, rats with concomitant TBI. Over time, different substances (cytokines, hormones, etc.) were in focus to elucidate the relationship between TBI and fracture healing. Until now, the mechanism behind this relationship is not fully clarified and a consensus on which substance plays the key role could not be attained in the literature. In this review, we will give an overview of current concepts and opinions on this topic published in the last decade and both clinical and pathophysiological theories will be discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus