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Direct patterning of gold nanoparticles using flexographic printing for biosensing applications.

Benson J, Fung CM, Lloyd JS, Deganello D, Smith NA, Teng KS - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Bottom Line: The average size of the printed AuNPs is less than 60 nm.Glucose sensing tests were performed using printed carbon-AuNP electrodes functionalized with glucose oxidase (GOx).We have demonstrated the fabrication of AuNP-based biosensors using flexographic printing, which is ideal for low-cost, high-volume production of the devices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Multidisciplinary Nanotechnology Centre, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, SA2 8PP UK.

ABSTRACT
In this paper, we have presented the use of flexographic printing techniques in the selective patterning of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) onto a substrate. Highly uniform coverage of AuNPs was selectively patterned on the substrate surface, which was subsequently used in the development of a glucose sensor. These AuNPs provide a biocompatible site for the attachment of enzymes and offer high sensitivity in the detection of glucose due to their large surface to volume ratio. The average size of the printed AuNPs is less than 60 nm. Glucose sensing tests were performed using printed carbon-AuNP electrodes functionalized with glucose oxidase (GOx). The results showed a high sensitivity of 5.52 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) with a detection limit of 26 μM. We have demonstrated the fabrication of AuNP-based biosensors using flexographic printing, which is ideal for low-cost, high-volume production of the devices.

No MeSH data available.


Images showing the contact angles of inks and for comparison, water. Images showing contact angles for (a) water, (b) AuNP ink + 0.5 g PVP and (c) AuNP ink, after drop casting onto printed carbon substrates. The images show contact angles of (a) 135°, (b) 42°, and (c) 6°, respectively, showing improved wetting by the AuNP ink.
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Fig3: Images showing the contact angles of inks and for comparison, water. Images showing contact angles for (a) water, (b) AuNP ink + 0.5 g PVP and (c) AuNP ink, after drop casting onto printed carbon substrates. The images show contact angles of (a) 135°, (b) 42°, and (c) 6°, respectively, showing improved wetting by the AuNP ink.

Mentions: Figure 3a shows the contact angle of a water droplet, which is shown as a control, after drop casting onto a printed carbon electrode. The droplet shows a contact angle of 135° indicating poor wetting of the electrode surface. In order to investigate the wetting issues seen by ink formulations with high PVP concentration, an additional 0.5 g of PVP was added to our ink and drop cast onto the printed carbon surface. Figure 3b shows the contact angle at this concentration to be 42° and indicates better wetting than water. However, the surface of the printed carbon was not completely wetted by the ink with this formulation. This resulted in inconsistent coverage where, after drying, some areas contained high densities of AuNPs and others contained low densities. This can occur throughout the printing process and can have a detrimental effect on the quality of the printed electrodes. Figure 3c shows a contact angle image of the optimised AuNP ink developed in this work which was used in the fabrication of the working electrode. The image shows the ink wets the surface well and has a very small contact angle of 6°. This demonstrates that the ink has the required wetting properties to provide consistency and uniformity in the deposition of AuNPs on the substrate.Figure 3


Direct patterning of gold nanoparticles using flexographic printing for biosensing applications.

Benson J, Fung CM, Lloyd JS, Deganello D, Smith NA, Teng KS - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Images showing the contact angles of inks and for comparison, water. Images showing contact angles for (a) water, (b) AuNP ink + 0.5 g PVP and (c) AuNP ink, after drop casting onto printed carbon substrates. The images show contact angles of (a) 135°, (b) 42°, and (c) 6°, respectively, showing improved wetting by the AuNP ink.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4385249&req=5

Fig3: Images showing the contact angles of inks and for comparison, water. Images showing contact angles for (a) water, (b) AuNP ink + 0.5 g PVP and (c) AuNP ink, after drop casting onto printed carbon substrates. The images show contact angles of (a) 135°, (b) 42°, and (c) 6°, respectively, showing improved wetting by the AuNP ink.
Mentions: Figure 3a shows the contact angle of a water droplet, which is shown as a control, after drop casting onto a printed carbon electrode. The droplet shows a contact angle of 135° indicating poor wetting of the electrode surface. In order to investigate the wetting issues seen by ink formulations with high PVP concentration, an additional 0.5 g of PVP was added to our ink and drop cast onto the printed carbon surface. Figure 3b shows the contact angle at this concentration to be 42° and indicates better wetting than water. However, the surface of the printed carbon was not completely wetted by the ink with this formulation. This resulted in inconsistent coverage where, after drying, some areas contained high densities of AuNPs and others contained low densities. This can occur throughout the printing process and can have a detrimental effect on the quality of the printed electrodes. Figure 3c shows a contact angle image of the optimised AuNP ink developed in this work which was used in the fabrication of the working electrode. The image shows the ink wets the surface well and has a very small contact angle of 6°. This demonstrates that the ink has the required wetting properties to provide consistency and uniformity in the deposition of AuNPs on the substrate.Figure 3

Bottom Line: The average size of the printed AuNPs is less than 60 nm.Glucose sensing tests were performed using printed carbon-AuNP electrodes functionalized with glucose oxidase (GOx).We have demonstrated the fabrication of AuNP-based biosensors using flexographic printing, which is ideal for low-cost, high-volume production of the devices.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Multidisciplinary Nanotechnology Centre, College of Engineering, Swansea University, Singleton Park, Swansea, SA2 8PP UK.

ABSTRACT
In this paper, we have presented the use of flexographic printing techniques in the selective patterning of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) onto a substrate. Highly uniform coverage of AuNPs was selectively patterned on the substrate surface, which was subsequently used in the development of a glucose sensor. These AuNPs provide a biocompatible site for the attachment of enzymes and offer high sensitivity in the detection of glucose due to their large surface to volume ratio. The average size of the printed AuNPs is less than 60 nm. Glucose sensing tests were performed using printed carbon-AuNP electrodes functionalized with glucose oxidase (GOx). The results showed a high sensitivity of 5.52 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) with a detection limit of 26 μM. We have demonstrated the fabrication of AuNP-based biosensors using flexographic printing, which is ideal for low-cost, high-volume production of the devices.

No MeSH data available.