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Crystallographic orientation-dependent pattern replication in direct imprint of aluminum nanostructures.

Yuan Y, Zhang J, Sun T, Liu C, Geng Y, Yan Y, Jin P - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Bottom Line: We investigate the influence of crystallographic orientation on the microscopic deformation behavior of the substrate materials and its correlation with the macroscopic pattern replications.Furthermore, the surface mechanical properties of the patterned structures are qualitatively characterized by nanoindentation tests.It is found that the (010) orientation leads to a better quality of pattern replication of single-crystalline aluminum than the (111) orientation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
In the present work, we perform molecular dynamics simulations corroborated by experimental validations to elucidate the underlying deformation mechanisms of single-crystalline aluminum under direct imprint using a rigid silicon master. We investigate the influence of crystallographic orientation on the microscopic deformation behavior of the substrate materials and its correlation with the macroscopic pattern replications. Furthermore, the surface mechanical properties of the patterned structures are qualitatively characterized by nanoindentation tests. Our results reveal that dislocation slip and deformation twinning are two primary plastic deformation modes of single-crystalline aluminum under the direct imprint. However, both the competition between the individual deformation mechanisms and the geometry between activated dislocation slip systems and imprinted surface vary with surface orientation, which in turn leads to a strong crystallographic orientation dependence of the pattern replications. It is found that the (010) orientation leads to a better quality of pattern replication of single-crystalline aluminum than the (111) orientation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Force-moving distance curve during the direct imprint simulation of Al(010).
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Fig3: Force-moving distance curve during the direct imprint simulation of Al(010).

Mentions: MD simulations are first conducted to obtain atomistic insights into the direct imprint of single-crystalline aluminum. FigureĀ 3 plots the variation of imprint force with moving distance during the direct imprint of Al(010). In the imprint stage, the force is zero when the master approaches the substrate surface until a moving distance of 1.1 nm is reached, at which the force goes down to a negative value due to the adhesion effect between the master and the substrate. When the master starts to penetrate into the substrate surface, the material first undergoes elastic deformation, accompanied with a rapid increase of the force. However, force-drop phenomenon occurs when the force reaches a local maximum value of 510 nN at a critical moving distance of 1.5 nm, indicating the initiation of plastic deformation in the substrate. Upon further imprint, the force increases continuously with fluctuation phenomena. After completion of the imprint stage, in the following withdrawing stage, the force first decreases precipitously, followed by a minor increase. Then, the force decreases rapidly and becomes zero at a moving distance of 3.2 nm, i.e., the residual imprint depth is 2.0 nm.Figure 3


Crystallographic orientation-dependent pattern replication in direct imprint of aluminum nanostructures.

Yuan Y, Zhang J, Sun T, Liu C, Geng Y, Yan Y, Jin P - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Force-moving distance curve during the direct imprint simulation of Al(010).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4385152&req=5

Fig3: Force-moving distance curve during the direct imprint simulation of Al(010).
Mentions: MD simulations are first conducted to obtain atomistic insights into the direct imprint of single-crystalline aluminum. FigureĀ 3 plots the variation of imprint force with moving distance during the direct imprint of Al(010). In the imprint stage, the force is zero when the master approaches the substrate surface until a moving distance of 1.1 nm is reached, at which the force goes down to a negative value due to the adhesion effect between the master and the substrate. When the master starts to penetrate into the substrate surface, the material first undergoes elastic deformation, accompanied with a rapid increase of the force. However, force-drop phenomenon occurs when the force reaches a local maximum value of 510 nN at a critical moving distance of 1.5 nm, indicating the initiation of plastic deformation in the substrate. Upon further imprint, the force increases continuously with fluctuation phenomena. After completion of the imprint stage, in the following withdrawing stage, the force first decreases precipitously, followed by a minor increase. Then, the force decreases rapidly and becomes zero at a moving distance of 3.2 nm, i.e., the residual imprint depth is 2.0 nm.Figure 3

Bottom Line: We investigate the influence of crystallographic orientation on the microscopic deformation behavior of the substrate materials and its correlation with the macroscopic pattern replications.Furthermore, the surface mechanical properties of the patterned structures are qualitatively characterized by nanoindentation tests.It is found that the (010) orientation leads to a better quality of pattern replication of single-crystalline aluminum than the (111) orientation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Precision Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, 150001 People's Republic of China.

ABSTRACT
In the present work, we perform molecular dynamics simulations corroborated by experimental validations to elucidate the underlying deformation mechanisms of single-crystalline aluminum under direct imprint using a rigid silicon master. We investigate the influence of crystallographic orientation on the microscopic deformation behavior of the substrate materials and its correlation with the macroscopic pattern replications. Furthermore, the surface mechanical properties of the patterned structures are qualitatively characterized by nanoindentation tests. Our results reveal that dislocation slip and deformation twinning are two primary plastic deformation modes of single-crystalline aluminum under the direct imprint. However, both the competition between the individual deformation mechanisms and the geometry between activated dislocation slip systems and imprinted surface vary with surface orientation, which in turn leads to a strong crystallographic orientation dependence of the pattern replications. It is found that the (010) orientation leads to a better quality of pattern replication of single-crystalline aluminum than the (111) orientation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus