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Angular shaping of fluorescence from synthetic opal-based photonic crystal.

Boiko V, Dovbeshko G, Dolgov L, Kiisk V, Sildos I, Loot A, Gorelik V - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Bottom Line: Fluorescence intensity increases up to two times at the edges of the spectral dip.Partial photobleaching of fluorescence was observed.Photonic origin of the observed effects is discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics of Biological System, Institute of Physics, NAS of Ukraine, Prospect Nauki 46, Kyiv, 03680 Ukraine.

ABSTRACT
Spectral, angular, and temporal distributions of fluorescence as well as specular reflection were investigated for silica-based artificial opals. Periodic arrangement of nanosized silica globules in the opal causes a specific dip in the defect-related fluorescence spectra and a peak in the reflectance spectrum. The spectral position of the dip coincides with the photonic stop band. The latter is dependent on the size of silica globules and the angle of observation. The spectral shape and intensity of defect-related fluorescence can be controlled by variation of detection angle. Fluorescence intensity increases up to two times at the edges of the spectral dip. Partial photobleaching of fluorescence was observed. Photonic origin of the observed effects is discussed.

No MeSH data available.


Fluorescence spectra of sample 2 measured at different detection angles. (1) 0°; (2) 10°; (3) 20°; (4) 30°; (5) 40°; (6) 70° (λexc = 266 nm).
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Fig9: Fluorescence spectra of sample 2 measured at different detection angles. (1) 0°; (2) 10°; (3) 20°; (4) 30°; (5) 40°; (6) 70° (λexc = 266 nm).

Mentions: Recording fluorescence at different angles reveals a systematic shift of the abovementioned spectral dip. It shifts toward shorter wavelengths with the increase of detection angle (Figure 9). This allows to control the fluorescence intensity in the spectral range covered by the photonic stop zone by changing detection angle. The spectral position of photonic dip in the fluorescence can be described well with Equation 1.Figure 9


Angular shaping of fluorescence from synthetic opal-based photonic crystal.

Boiko V, Dovbeshko G, Dolgov L, Kiisk V, Sildos I, Loot A, Gorelik V - Nanoscale Res Lett (2015)

Fluorescence spectra of sample 2 measured at different detection angles. (1) 0°; (2) 10°; (3) 20°; (4) 30°; (5) 40°; (6) 70° (λexc = 266 nm).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4385143&req=5

Fig9: Fluorescence spectra of sample 2 measured at different detection angles. (1) 0°; (2) 10°; (3) 20°; (4) 30°; (5) 40°; (6) 70° (λexc = 266 nm).
Mentions: Recording fluorescence at different angles reveals a systematic shift of the abovementioned spectral dip. It shifts toward shorter wavelengths with the increase of detection angle (Figure 9). This allows to control the fluorescence intensity in the spectral range covered by the photonic stop zone by changing detection angle. The spectral position of photonic dip in the fluorescence can be described well with Equation 1.Figure 9

Bottom Line: Fluorescence intensity increases up to two times at the edges of the spectral dip.Partial photobleaching of fluorescence was observed.Photonic origin of the observed effects is discussed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics of Biological System, Institute of Physics, NAS of Ukraine, Prospect Nauki 46, Kyiv, 03680 Ukraine.

ABSTRACT
Spectral, angular, and temporal distributions of fluorescence as well as specular reflection were investigated for silica-based artificial opals. Periodic arrangement of nanosized silica globules in the opal causes a specific dip in the defect-related fluorescence spectra and a peak in the reflectance spectrum. The spectral position of the dip coincides with the photonic stop band. The latter is dependent on the size of silica globules and the angle of observation. The spectral shape and intensity of defect-related fluorescence can be controlled by variation of detection angle. Fluorescence intensity increases up to two times at the edges of the spectral dip. Partial photobleaching of fluorescence was observed. Photonic origin of the observed effects is discussed.

No MeSH data available.